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Full text of "Antioch News 10/07/1994"

Hf Lakeland Newspapers Welcomes 1 81 NEW Subscribers This Week H 




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AN0757 12/28/94 
ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 
757 MAIN STREET 
Antioch -.„. 



**C-7 



IL 600K 





NTIO^fUS|iapcifflRARY DISTRICT 
757 N. Main Street 
. Antioch, IL 60002 ^t 

V' 01994-ASchroodorPubBcallon ^w^j ' 



VOL. 108 NO. 40 



ANTIOCH OCi^» 



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...RSECTIONS-96 PAGES 



50 CENTS 









COMMUNITY 



Antioch Schwirih 
to renovate 
PAGtti 



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ative 



Mother turning auto 
tragedy into legislative 





PACE Bl 



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LAKELIFE 



activities 

lyrist Preserve plans 
variety of fall events 
PAGEB9 



BUSINESS 




Gurnee welcomes 
manufacturer 
RAGE CI 

INDEX 

Antique; &Gi»fts;;.;g : .C2 5 ) 
BricJaI ..,.....:...;.......;:;;.B19 i 

Business .......,...,....;..;.. CI 

ClASsifld... ;....;....... .. C 1 2 

GouNTy News.,;.......,..... Bl ; 

GRa5SW0Rd.,......„.„,,„..:Bl 7 

EdiTORiAl/OpiNioN >...:....; B4 

FaII FoliAqE;. ....... v.. ....... B6 ; 

Good BEqitsNiNqs. ...... . : . B28 

HcAlThwATdi...,..^..;..;....G5 

Horoscope.; .'..,■ ....... B 1 5 

LegaI NbiicES:; ?. ..A 14 & G 1.0-1 
LipsERyice:;;'.'-. ■.;.'..' .;...^B26 - 
ObiTUARiES.. v ......,...;.;;...G^ 

Wiiiffi?fo : '&t duT;..;.v.:;B)6 



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Pinfc Hills 
work near 



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At long last, the drainage 
system and shoreline cleaning at 
Pine Hills subdivision has been 
completed. According to Robert 
Silhan, director of planning, 
zoning, and- building, "The 
walking paths are two-thirds 
complete. Weather permitting, 
they could be done this week." 

The owner of the Pine Hills 
Lakes development, NBD Bank, 
had received numerous 
extensions to get drainage 
problems under control as well as 
to enter into a contract for the 
construction of walking paths. 
The Antioch Village Board has 
granted another extension to 
complete the walking paths. 

Mayor Marilyn -Shineflug, 
Silhan, and other village staff 
members met ' with 

representatives of NBD Bank of 
Mount Prospect several times to 
discuss some of the needed 
improvements. 







Moving in 

Construction vehicles prepare another Lake County site for new home construction. Citizens 
groups, school officials and villages have been raising concerns about the Impact of growth 
and development on Infrastructures, wetlands arid roadways. This bulldozer Is making room 
for a Cambridge development on Lotus Avenue In Round Lake Heights. — Photo by Todd F. 
Holster 



Voting areas not certain for unit district 



MARY FOLEY 
Staff Reporter 

As a result of a highly 
confusing and complicated 
statute, it is not yet known 
exactly which voters or areas will 
be allowed to cast ballots on the 
various issues related the Lake 



Villa Unit School District: 
(LVUSD). The essential question 
will be whether or not, for the 
first time in Illinois, existing 
school districts will be detached 
to form a new unit district in 
.Lake Villa. 

The statute regulating which 



areas will be allowed to vote on 
the issue has two- separate 
formulas. The first part would 
include those residents in the 
proposed territory to be 
detached if 25 percent or more of 
the total land area of the district 
is to become part of the new 



district. However, other areas 
may also be able to vote if they' 
meet the second formula. 

Unfortunately, trie second 
formula is nearly incomprehen- 
sible: ".'. .or if the difference 
between the per cent of student 
Sec ISSUE page A10 



Officer nabs suspect with drugs, currency 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

As a result of some excellent 
police work by Antioch Police 
Officer Craig Somcrville, Richard 
J. Malone, of Mallard Street in 



Antioch was arrested Oct. 1., 
Maolonc was charged for 
possession of more. than 400 
grams of cannabis, possession of 
cannabis with the intent to 
distribute,, possession of a 



controlled substance, possession 
of a controlled substance with 
the intent to distribute, two 
counts of domestic battery, and 
disorderly conduct. 

"Somcrville did a really 




Spinnin' in the Schoolyard 

Emmons School fourth-graders take. a spinning ride on their playground merry-go-round during 
recess. This fall's moderate, temperatures have made- for plenty of outside fun.— Photo by 
Todd F. Holslor 



outstanding job," said 
Lieutenant Charles Watkins. "As 
a patrolman, he has taken it to 
the next level." 

Somcrville responded to a 
report of a domestic battery at 
Ipscn's Cleaners on 520 Lake 
Street Apparently Malone and a 
former girlfriend met 
unexpectedly and resumed an 
earlier argument. Malone 
reportedly punched and kicked 
the woman, who fled to her car 
for safety. Malone had been 
arrested by the Lake County 
Sheriff's Department only 12 
hours earlier on an another 
charge of domestic battery. 

Malone was arrested again for 
domestic battery and brought to 
the Antioch Police Department 
where Somcrville found 80 
tablets of Valium, a muscle 
refaxcr-tranquilizcr, in a plastic 
container. After searching 
Malonc's shirt, coat and pockets, 
it was discovered he was also 
carrying $9,998 in cash along 
with a telephone beeper. 

"Somcrville went back to 
Malonc's vehicle .to get the VI N 
(vehicle identification number)," 
explained Watkins. At the 
automobile, Somcrville spotted a 
clear plastic bag believed to 
contain cannabis in plain view. 
After obtaining permission to 
See NABS page A10 



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OctodmJ, 1994 LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY! 





Scout-o-Rama 

Left, Andrew Snyder of Cub Scout Pack 78 In Waukegan takes a moment alone to reflect on 
the day's events. Center area scouts participate In a cast off contest In the lake at the Lake 
County Forest Preserve. Right, Walt Keith of Troop 9 In Wllmont glides over the water on a 
slide for life demonstration.— Photos by Todd F. Holster 




Village taking leaf blowing survey 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

Village of Antioch employees 
will , be visiting resident on' 
Saturday to obtain opinions 
regarding a leaf blowing program 
offered by Waste Management. 
Waste Management is the con- 
tract hauler for the village 
garbage. 

The leaf blowing program 
would allow village residents 1 to 
simply rake leaves to the curb 
instead of separately bagging 
leaves. Currently, leaves and yard 
waste must be bagged separately 
from other home waste products. 

However, one trustee, Don 
Amundsen, did voice some con- 
cerns regarding the dates on 
which Waste Management would 
remove the leaves from the 'curb. 
Village Administrator Tim Wells 
told the . board Waste 



Management would remove the 
leaves on Oct.' 31, Nov. 5, then 
skipping a week and returning 
the week after. 

"It's too late," said 
Amundsen. "My concern is the 
timing of the pick-up (blowing." 

Board members and staff 
launched into a lengthy discus- 
sion of when leaves fall. The 
board was told by Downtown 
Development Director Claude 
LcMcre that the timing of falling 
leaves depends on the type of 
tree. "Ash tree leaves are falling 
now," said LeMerc. 

Mayor Marilyn Shineflug 
opined the timing of falling leaves 
was the result of the vagaries of 
wind, rain and temperature and 
said, "That is why we are going to 
the trouble of getting the survey," 
she said. "It could be that the 



majority of residents don't want 
this." 

Amundsen clarified his position 
saying that he had no problem with 
the survey, or the program itself, 
but still had concerns with the 
dates Waste Management has 
offered "They (leaves) go the last 
two weeks in October," Amundsen 
said. "The last pick up in 
November would be useless." 

Nevertheless, despite timing 
misgivings, the survey will be 
conducted on Saturday. The pro- 
gram will cost residents an addi- 
tional $6 a year and will not pre- 
clude the continued used of bags. 
Residents who arc not home on 
Saturday will be given a specific 
time to call the village to provide 
their opinions. No mailings or 
drop-offs of the survey will be 
accepted. , 



BrieFs 



Club reception 



Lakeland ( usps ; 

j£t*£pL 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Otllce ol Publication: 30 South Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 00030. Phono (706)223 8161. 

Published weekly, second class postage paid at 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rates: $19.50 Per Year by Mail 
paid in advance in Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 
McHeniy Counties; elsewhere $27.00 Per Year 
by Mail paid In advance. 

Postmaster Send address changes to Antioch 
News- Reporter, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. 
Box 268, Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 

(708) 223-8161 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 

Lake Villa Record 
Mundeisin News 
Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press 



Gurrtee Press 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

Lbertyvilte News 

Lindenhurst News 

Warren-Newport Press 



Vernon Hills News 
M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder- 1904 -1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher/President 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

SHARON ZASADIL 

Operations Manager 
JILL DePASQUALE BOB SCHROEDER 

JO DAVIS ANN M. ROBERTS 

. RHONDA HETRrCK BURKE 

Edtafo-Owl 



Schwinn getting facelift 

MARY FOLEY -_z 

Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Village Board has authorized the Village Attorney, Ken 
Clark, to draw up an ordinance to okay a buy down loan for Antioch 
Schwinn. The buy down loan was recommended by the redevelop- 
ment commission. 

Once the ordinance has been approved, Schwinn will begin reno- 
vations on their store front. The store is seeking $7,134 to do facade 
work. 

Some of the improvements will include pressure washing and tuck- 
pointing on the older building. Schwinn will also use the money for 
painting. 

The buy down loan program offers village businesses an opportu- 
nity to seek low interest loans from local banks for facade improve- 
ments in line with the downtown development plan. Several other 
area businesses have taken advantage of the program including the 
new Williams Brothers building and the Four Squires. 

The ordinance received approval from all the trustees, with Trustee 
Marvin Qldcnburgcr passing on the vote because of his affiliation with 
a local bank. The Schwinn building is located on 090 Main Street. 

Antioch receives more funds 



As a result of the availability 
of additional funds, villages 
along the proposed new Mctra 
line on the Wisconsin-Central 
tracks will receive more money 
from Operation Green Light. 

The money is specifically 
targeted for the parking facili- 



ties at the soon to be built sta- 
tions. 

Antioch, which will be the 
northern most station, is in line 
to receive an additional $44,000. 
This brings the funding amount 
for the station and parking facili- 
ties to $150,000. 



The Antioch Republican Club is holding a reception to meet 
a Willard Helandcr, Republican candidate for Lake County 
Clerk. The reception will be on Sunday, Oct 16 from 6 to 8 p.m. 
at Mentone's Restaurant Other invited guests include State 
Representative Robert Churchill, Lake County Sheriff Clint 
Grinnell, Lake County Treasurer "Red" Anderson, and Judy 
Martini, the Lake County Board candidate for Dist 1. 

Craft demonstration 

Tobi Star Abrams will present a hands-on demonstration in 
making corn husk dolls from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 
the Antioch Public Library. Abrams is a qualified, experienced 
teacher of folk arts including corn husk dolls and basket mak- 
ing. Space is limited to 25 people, so sign up at the library as 
soon as possible or call 395-0874. 

Attention ACHS alumni 

Join your fellow Antioch Community High School graduates 
for an alumni mixer to be held Saturday, Oct. 15 at 8 p.m. at the 
Regency Inn in Antioch. Graduates of all classes are invited to 
attend and get re-acquainted with former classmates and 
friends. 

College night at ACHS 

Antioch Community High School's guidance department 
will conduct its annual College Night Program on Monday, Oct 
31. Fifty-four colleges and universities have been scheduled to 
have representatives in attendance. The representatives will be 
available in the school commons area to meet with students 
and parents between 7 and 9 p.m. 

Fall luncheon 

The Antioch Christian Women's Club will be holding their 
"Hats Off to Fall" luncheon on Oct 20 from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at 
the Waterfalls Restaurant. Hats for all occasions will be present- 
ed by Jo Rcid. Nursery services arc available for children 10 and 
under. For reservations call 223-6085 or 587-7908 by Oct 13. 

CPR classes 

The Antioch Rescue Squad is offering free CPR classes to the 
public on the second Wednesday of every month at .6:30 p.m. 
Classes arc held at the Rescue Squad building. Call 395-0302 for 
reservations. 



Footlights 



St. Peter Parish is once again gearing up for their annual 
"Footlights" entertainment event on Nov. 5, 6, 13, and 14. This 
year there will be ten rooms of music, dancing, comedy, and 
other great entertainment and refreshments along with a casi- 
no. Tickets can be obtained in advance by calling 395-0274. 

Alcohol awareness 

The Antioch Fire Department Fire Prevention Bureau will be 
presenting a video addressing the dangers of drinking and dri- 
ving at Antioch Community High School. The presentation will 
be held Oct, 26 at 3 p.m.. 




COMMUNITY UkEUd Newspapers OcTobea 7, T994 



-■ 



\ 



. 



> 



i 



AUGS closer to information highway r BmEfs 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

As a result of the dedication of 
District 34 Board of Education to 
increased technology, Antioch 
Upper Grade School is moving 
closer every day to the "informa- 
tion superhighway." Parents of 
students at the school were noti- 
fied in the school newsletter that 
28 computers are networked. 

"We are running the wires," 
said Bob Brown, a computer 
teacher at AUGS. "Hopefully, 
we'll be able to get wires run to 
each classroom." 

Over the summer, the school 
purchased a Lantastic, 50 user 
network. The network hooks up 
to their 28 MS DOS computers 
and has the ability to connect to 



many more. 

"Teachers will he able to share 
files," said Brown. "They will be 
able to put certain programs on 
the server." 

But, the networking has more 
far reaching capabilities than just 
sharing files, Brown is looking 
towards the day when grades and 
attendance can be executed on 
the computer, directly from the 
classroom. 

"Hopefully, soon the grades 
will done on the computer," 
said Brown. "It will greatly 
reduce the time It takes to send 
them all in." 

Also in the not-too-distant 
future, the school is planning to 
establish a bulletin board service. 
At this time, the school already is 



using a modem to download 
weather photos and information 
for science classes. The possibili- 
ties arc endless. 

The school Is hoping to 
acquire more computers next 
year. At this time the school has a 
mix of both Apple and IBM com- 
patibles. 

Imagine a time when students 
needing help with homework 
would only need to connect to the 
school's bulletin board for help. 
And, the old excuse of "my dog ate 
my homework" will never be 
heard of again when it becomes 
possible for students to upload 
their homework from home. 

You don't need to stretch your 
imagination too far, the day is 
coming soon. 



Free preschool screening for children 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Community 

Consolidated School District 34 is 
offering a free preschool screen- 
ing to all 3 and 4-year-old chil- 
dren in the district. The screen- 
ings will be held on Oct 25, 26, 
and 27. 

The purpose of the screenings 
is to identify those children in the . 
district with speech and language 
difficulties, motor coordination 
difficulties, or developmental 
delays. The screenings will be 
held at Antioch Grade School and 
Oakland Grade School. 



Appointments arc necessary and 
must be made by Oct, 25. 

Those children identified with 
difficulties or delays may be 
helped through the Pre-kindcr- 
garten Program for Children at 
Risk of Academic Failure. The pro- 
gram is for children between the 
ages of 3 and 5 who are in need of 
enhanced learning to prepare 
them for a successful educational 
experience. In addition, the At 
Risk Program improves parenting 
skills for the children's parents. 

The program has two teach- 
ers, two teacher assistants, and a 
family resource counselor. The 



children cither attend a half-day 
session four days a week, or 
become part of the home-start 
program. The home start program 
is for younger learners or those 
children whose parents arc 
unable to get them to school. 

To make an appointment, 
those living in the Oakland Grade 
School area should call 395-1730 
while those in the Antioch Grade 
School area should call 395-0845. 
Each building principal, Jim 
Licnhardt at Oakland and Mary 
Kay McNeill at Antioch will 
answer questions about the 
screenings. 



Nominate a high school teacher for a Golden Apple 



Nominations are open for the 
10th Annual Golden Apple 
Awards, honoring 10 Chicago- 
area teachers each year for ex- 
cellence in classroom teaching. 

Winners receive $2,500, a paid 



sabbatical to study tuition-free at 
Northwestern University, a per- 
sonal computer from IBM and 
induction into the Golden Apple 
Academy of educators, an organi- 
zation that initiates programs to 



improve education. 

• To obtain a nomination form, call 
(312)407-0006 or write the Golden 
Apple Foundation, 8 S. Michigan 
Ave., Suite 700, Chicago, IL 60603- 
3318. Nominations dose Dec 2. 



We'll be there for you 

When you have an auto accident, you want 
your claim settled fast and fair, so you can 
get on with the things that matter to you. We 
settle many claims the same day, and most 
others within a week. See us for great 
service, before and after a claim. 

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Calligraphy classes 



Calligraphy classes, at both the beginning and Intermediate 
skill levels, arc being offered at the Antioch Upper Grade 
School. The class will meet for eight weeks and the fee Is $50. 
It is open to all ages and anyone interested should call the ,',';. 
school at 395-1905. 



Up the creek 



The seventh-grade science Classes at Antioch Upper Grade . 
School will be investigating the water of Antioch and Scquolt 
Creek. Students will be modeling rivers in a stream table, water 
testing of takes and streams, and water supplies. At the end of 
October, students will spend a week at Scquoit Creek measur- 
ing the creek profile, the speed of the water, testing the soil 
around the creek and the quality of water. 

Peddlers Alley 

The Antioch Community High School Student Assistance 
Program (SAP) presents the Third Annual Peddler's Alley Craft 
Show on Saturday, Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. With over 40 
crafters on hand, there should be something for everyone. 
Food will be served along with a bake sale and raffle to benefit 
various programs within the SAP. 

Sports schedule for AUGS 

The Antioch Upper Grade School Softball team has one more 
game to go this season. The team will be playing Gavin on Oct. 
1 1 at 4 p.m. at home. There are two more games for the soccer 
team. The team will play Gavin at home at 4 p.m. on Oct 1 1 and 
the Vikings on Oct. 12, away. Good luck to both teams! 



PTSA Meeting 



The Antioch Upper Grade School PTSA will meet on Oct. 24 
at 7 p.m. The group usually meets the fourth Monday of each 
month. Individual membership in the group is $3 and $5 for 
two members from the same family. 



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OcrobfR 7, 1 994 LaIceIancJ Newspapers COMMUNITY 





Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven 
guilty In a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Shots Cured 

Dennis Stuit, age 43, of Antioch was arrested on Sept 30, 
when Antioch Police Department received a report of shots 
fired. When police arrived, they observed a wooden target in . 
Stult's backyard. Stuit admitting to discharging his gun and was 
charged after he was unable to provide officers with a firearm 
owners identification card. Police confiscated Stult's shotgun 
and a rifle. * 

Possession of cannabis 

Steven P. Estep, age 17, of Antioch, was charged on Sept. 30 
with possession of cannabis. Police had picked up Estep at his 
home regarding the follow-up of a traffic complaint When 
police observed a large bulge in the front pocket of Estep, police 
conducted a pat-down and found a metal pipe containing, what 
is believed to be cannabis. Estep was released on bond.. . 



License suspended 



Thomas P. Hcdrich, age 29, of Fox Lake was arrested and 
charged with driving while his license was suspended on Oct. 2. 
Hcdrich, was stopped after he was observed traveling at a high 
rate of speed. Hcdrich was also charged with speeding. He was 
released on bond. 

DUI 

Rick A. Kccfer, age 28, of Antioch, was arrested on Sept 28 
for driving under the influence of alcohol. Kcefer was stopped 
after being observed traveling 56 mph in a 45 mph zone. 

LINDENHURST 

Battery traced to gang issue 

Shane Muchka, 19, 2011 Old Elm, Lindcnhurst, on Sept. 28, 
was arrested for battery. The complainant claims Muchka 
approached him while he was leaving the Lindcnhurst Men's 
Club and asked him why he had given the "kings" his address. 
The complainant alleges Muchka hit him with a closed fist and 
slapped him with an open hand. 

Caught drinking and driving 

Eric Stcphan, 44, Cherokee, Round Lake Beach, on Sept. 26, 
was charged with felony driving under the influence and driving 
with license revoked. He was stopped by the officer for erratic 
driving and for having an obscured license plate. Stcphan failed 
field sobriety tests and refused a breath test It was found he 
had five previous driving under the influence convictions. 

Frank Ptak, 26, Clifton, Round Lake Park, on Sept 30, was 
arrested for driving under the influence and speeding. The offi- 
cer clocked Ptak driving 61 mph in a 45 mph zone of Rte. 132 
and was stopped. Ptak failed field sobriety tests and refused a 
breath test 



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County officials confiscate 
$3.5 million worth of 




• • 



SPENCER SCHEIN 
Staff Reporter 

More than $3.5 million worth 
of marijuana was seized and 
burned within a four-day-span in 
Lake County, ranking as the 
largest seizures by the Lake 
County Metropolitan Enforce- 
ment Agency this season, an offi- 
cial said. 

MEG officials burned 410 plants 
of high quality marijuana with an 
estimated street value of more than 
$1.8 million in Mundclein Oct 3, 
according to Mark Rasmusscn, 
MEG deputy director. 

They also burned 380 plants 
found in a field southwest of the 
intersection of Route 12 and Case 
Road in Wauconda Township 
Sept. 30, with an estimated street 
value of $1.7 million. 



Both fields were fertilized, 
watered and wcU taken care of, 
and were about 100 yards by 40 
yards in size, Rasmusscn said. 

He said he could not disclose 
how the fields were discovered or 
who owned the properties as 
both cases were pending further 
investigation. 

There arc some suspects, 
although none arc in custody, he 
said. 

. Samples from both marijuana 
fields were sent to a crime lab for 
potency testing, among others. 

"Both fields looked to be very 
high quality marijuana plants," 
Rasmusscn said. 

Each plant could have yielded 
between three and five pounds of 
smoke-able marijuana, Rasmus- 
sen said. 



marijuana 

The growing season for mari- 
juana is the same for other put-' 
.door crops, with seeds planted in 
late March or early April and the" 
plants harvested around- this 
time, he said. 

MEG officials believe they 
found the field just before It 
would have been harvested 1 and 
distributed for sale. 

Mundclein police and fire' 
officials assisted MEG in 
Mundclein. Wauconda police 
and fire officials participated in 
the Sept. 30 event, even though it 
was just outside the police 
department's jurisdiction. 

Wauconda Police Chief 
Andrew, W. Mayer said it was the 
biggest field of marijuana he has 
seen in the Wauconda area since 
becoming chief four years ago. 



Police charge three in giant spider theft 



STEVE PETERSON 



Staff Reporter 

An anonymous tip led police 
to recover the symbol of fall in 
Lake County. 

'Tiny the Spider," of Six Flags 
Great America was stolen from the 
theme park in the* early morning 
hours of Oct 1. Police found the 
spider at a Gurnce garage Oct 4. 

Charged with retail theft over 
$300, criminal trespass to prop- 
erty and criminal damage, arc: 
Mike Battels of 32948 Meadow 
Rd., Wild wood; Lawrence Elltts, 
35350 Country Club Road, 



Gurnec and William Walthcr, 
71574 MaCree, Waukcgan. All are 
20 years old. 

"The spider was found at 
Country Club Road in plain 
view," Sgt. Irving Sheldon, 
Gurnce Police Department, said. 

Sheldon said the three were 
thinking about the theft for the last 
two Frightfcst seasons. "It was 
more of a scavenger hunt They did 
not intend to steal it," Sheldon said. 
The three confessed. 

The spider was returned to Six 
Rags Great America where it will be 
repaired and put back in place. 



The spider measures 40 by 40 
by 10 feet and cost $15,000. Police 
estimate the theft occurred be- 
tween 3:30 and 7 a.m. 

"This is very disappointing to 
us. The spider had been a land- 
mark along the toll way. We do 
not know what could have hap- 
pened," Connie Costcllo, Six 
Flags spokesperson, said in an 
earlier interview. 

She said there is a security 
presence, but no one else should 
have been in the park. "We had 
just had a contest to name it and 
it was named 'Tiny'," she added. 



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COMMUNITY UkelANd Newspapers Octodcr 7, 1 994 












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Halloween just not the same without little Moose 



Special day 

On Oct. 22, Dorothy and 
Steven Bies of Antioch will be cel- 
ebrating their eleventh wedding 
anniversary. Congratulations arc 
extended to you both from Lizard 
and readers, and wishes for many 
more happy years together. 

Hello 

Will the real "Mrs. Whoever" 
please stand up! I would like to 
say hello to "Mrs. Mitchell." You 
know who you are. It was great 
talking to you, and someday, I 
will get your family name right. 
Till then, stay happy and in- 
volved with those youngsters and 
keep calling in those special fam- 
ily memory tidbits. 

Clean nest 

I recently had occasion to talk 
with a visitor from California. ' 
When Mary Ellen Thompson was 
introduced to me, she said, "I 
understand you write a commu- 
nity column and are also an ani- 
mal lover." I indicated agree- 
ment She then asked if I would 
like a couple of cute animal sto- 
ries for the column. I quickly 
pulled outmy paper and pen*. 

Mary Ellen has a pool located 
on the property of her California 
home and near the pool Is a tree 
housing a family of crows. Mary 
Ellen' swears they keep a spotless 
nest, as they have yet to fly over 
her pool without dropping in a 
special gift. 1 suggested a pool 
cover. She is thinking about 
chopping down the tree. 

Read on... 

Trick or treat 

Mary Ellen told me about a 
very special little dog named 
Moose. Moose was a little 
daschund owned by her friend, 

Flu shots offered 
at grocery stores 

Dominick's Finer Foods, Inc. 
will offer low cost flu shots at 45 
Dominick's stores and 16 of its 
OMNI Superstores during 
September, October and 
November. 

The inoculations will be done 
by the Visiting Nurse Assn. (VNA) 
of Chicago, a not-for-profit home 
health care agency providing 
hospice, pharmacy and medical 
equipment services. One of the 
oldest and most established 
home heal tli agencies in the city, 
the VNA provided over 100,000 
home health visits to clients last 
year. 

This is the second year that 
Dominick's and the VNA have 
offered the flue shot program to 
Chicagoland area residents. The 
administration of flu inocula- 
tions helps prevent the onset of 
the flu virus in susceptible indi- 
viduals. 

Dominick's Finer Foods, Inc. 
is a privately held company; 
OMNI Superstores is a separate 
division of Dominick's, and there 
are 84 Dominick's and 17 OMNI 
units operating in the 
Chicagoland area, 

The dates and store locations 
in Lake County are: Saturday, 
Oct. 8, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at 
OMNI, 750 E. Rollins Rd., 
Round Lake Beach; Thursday, 
Nov. 10, from 4 to 7 p.m. at 1 160 
Lake Cook Rd., Buffalo Grove; 
and Friday, Nov. 11, from 4 to 7 
p.m. at 345 S. Rand Rd., Lake 
Zurich. 



Linda Roberts. When Linda's 
daughters received Moose as a 
gift around Halloween, they 
dressed him up and took him 
trick or treating with them. The 
neighbors thought It was cute 
and many of them gave him a 
small doggie treat. 

The next Halloween, they 
decided to take him along again. 
They put on his clown hat and 
collar and off they went, Linda 
and the girls believed he remem- 
bered going the year before as he 
strutted up to each home with 
them and sat with anticipation. 
Once again, many people gave 
him a small treat. 

When the next Halloween 
rolled around, they added his 
own treat pumpkin. He was quite 
intelligent and he quickly under- 
stood he was to carry it in his 
mouth. Once again he strutted 
proudly along, practically leading 
the way. This time he would wait 
at each door and as soon as he 
heard the treat land in the buck- 
et, he went on his way. 

As the girls got older, Linda 
began to walk Moose around the 
block each Halloween. It became 
a fun tradition. She would wait by 
the road, tell him to walk up to 
the houses and knock. Moose 
would strut up to the door, 
scratch with his paw, receive his 
treat and go merrily on his way. 

For 16 years, this was the tra- 
dition of the quiet neighborhood. 
He not only received doggie 
treats, but many of the neighbors 
began giving him special doggie 
toys. When Moose died this past 
April, linda buried him on her 
property with his treasured box 
of doggie toys. Many of the 
neighbors came to bid him 
farewell and join in Linda's tears. 

The neighbors arc now in the 
process of begging Linda to get 
Moose No. 2 and train him to 



trick or treat as Halloween in the 
neighborhood just won't be the 
same without him. Dumb ani- 
mals indeed! 

Compulsion 

In the near future, I may find it 
necessary to organize a new sup- 
port group called "PFA" (Picture 
Frames Anonymous). Thanks to 
my dear friend, "Sylvia from the 
City," I got involved In a new 



HOMETOWN GOODIES 



LIZ 
SCHMEHL 




595-5580 



hobby of collecting and display- 
ing a variety of family photos in 
picture frames of all sizes and 
styles throughout the house. 
Heck, I have 18 different frames 
displayed oh my piano alone, not 



to mention all of the other dis- 
play places in my family room, 
such as fireplace mantel, corner 
shelves, furniture tops and the 
walls themselves— and I'm just 
getting started. 

Sylvia and I analyzed the rea- 
sons behind our removing trea- 
sured pictures from our tucked- 
away albums to picture frames 
totally visible to us on a daily 
basis and also to visitors to our 
home. We decided, since our 
children arc grown .and not 
around on a constant basis, it Is 
like keeping our homes filled 
with their presence, our own 
childhood memories, memories 
of our parents and grandparents. 
I personally feel that our family 
room has become a warmer and 
happier place to be. 

As I go about my chores and 
glance at the pictures, it reaf- 
firms, in a very special way, the 
Importance of family and what 
life is really all about. It instantly 



brings to mind happy memories 
and has a way of setting a posi- 
tive pace for the day ahead. All I 
can say Is, try It, you'll like It 

Happy birthday 

It can't be, but It is, October 
already. Happy October birthday 
to — Leslie Bennett, Don Bcrgl, 
Dorothy Bies, Jamie Brausam, 
Christy Charvat, Cathy Chlnn, 
Brian Dcmbinski, Larry Edelman, 
Jr., Russ Falrchild, Marc 
Fechtncr, Dan Filips, Angie Grob, 
Surah Groh, Ryan Hansen, Justin 
Kasprzak, Eddie Lindstrom, Cari 
Maloof, Mary Marsich, Steve 
Marsich, Ursula Martens, 
Charissa Mlsch, David Mozal, 
Bobby Murrin, Joey Nava, 
Tommy O'Brien, Amanda 
O'Connor, Lois Pctykowski, 
Nicole Schallcr, Mcaghan 
Shannahan, Kirstcn Smith, Paige 
Tybor, Christine Vos, Patti Vos, 
JoAnnc Weber and Tommy 
Wcbcl. 




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Oc™b« 7, 1994 UIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 




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NiNqs— 

Fall classes starting at park 



Boys basketball 

Boys basketball is a seven 
week cllnic-stylc program for 
boys 9 to 12 years old which 
meets on Monday nights. After 
registration, the coach will divide 
the players into two groups. One 
group will play in the Petty Gym 
from 5:45 to 7 p.m., the other at 
the Antioch Upper Grade School 
from 7 to 8:15 p.m. Parents will 
be notified prior to the first meet- 
ing which' group their son has 
been assigned. Clinic dates are 
Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12 and 
Jan. 2 and 9. Fee is $30. 

line dancing 

The park district, wants to 
hold a line dancing class, but 
cannot until there is a minimum 
of 20 people signed up. Call 395- 
2160 If interested. 

Tumbling and things 

Tumbling class includes 
warm up, flexibility exercises, 
forward and backward rolls and 
much more. The class will be 
divided into four week sessions. 



It is for ages 4 years and up and 
meets at the Antioch Senior 
Center on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 
7:30p'm.'Costis$22. 

Young Rembrandts 

Young Rembrandts is a draw- 
ing program for children. Basic 
drawing and observation skills 
arc incorporated into this pro- 
gram, as well as learning and 
practicing different shapes, lines, 
textures and techniques. All 
materials arc supplied. Each ses- 
sion is four weeks,. The next ses- 
sion Is Oct. 21. 

Ages 3 to 5 years will meet on 
Fridays from 2:30 to 3:15 p.m. at 
' Scout House. Ages 6 to 8 and 9 to 
12 meet on Fridays from 4 to 4:45 
p.m. (for 6 to 8 year olds) or 5 to 
5:45 p.m. .(for 9 to 12 year olds) at 
Antioch Lower Grade School. Fee 
for each session is $25 for resi- 
dents, $30 for township residents 
and $35 for others, s 

For more information con- 
cerning programs or registration, 
call the Antioch Parks and 
Recreation office at 395-2160. 



■'■ i- ''~'*S;:-T ■>■' T*- v >-> "*>*>'' *. 





\ 'j f &r$>'!h 






Reptile friend 

Jeff Gross, a part owner of "Tanks to You* In Antioch, lets children of the Llndenhurst Early 
Childhood Center pet an Iguana named "Qulncy" at the center. Gross brought a variety of 
exotic pets from the store to educate the children about animals. — Photo by Todd F. Holster 



Auto-ber Feast comes to Antioch PADS to open shelters for the homeless 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

If you are hoping to purchase 
a new car this year and like a 
good October Pest, you are going 
to love Antioch's newest event, 
the Auto-ber Feast. Sponsored 
by the Village of Antioch, 
Community Action Now, the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce/, 
and the Antioch Alliance of Auto 
Dealers (AAAD), this combina- 
tion 1995 auto show and October 
Fest is scheduled for Oct. 7 and 8. 

The sale will feature vehicles 
made by Lincoln, Chevy, GMC, 
Oldsmobilc, Chrysler, podge, 
Buick, Jeep, Mercury, Plymouth, 
Pbntiac, Ford, Eagle, and 
Suburban. Over 200 cars arc 

Homeowners to meet 

The members of United 
Homeowners Associations of 
Unincorporated Antioch 

(UHAUA) have decided to hold a 
general membership meeting on 
Oct 19 at 7:30 p.m. The group, 
which meets on the third 
Wednesday of each month, dis- 
cusses common problems and 
solutions to those problems fac- 
ing subdivisions and homeowner 
associations in the area. 



expected to be on display, all of 
them new. 

The two-day event will take 
place in the village on Toft Avenue 
as well as in the municipal lots 
behind the Moose CTub and the 
watertbwer. Besides the cars, area 
banks will be setting up comput- 
ers and fax machines to facilitate 
easy financing for buyers. 

Along with the cars, there will 
be food and nonalcoholic bever- 
ages. Prizes will be given to lucky 
raffle winners, and musical 
entertainment will be ongoing. 

The Feast begins Oct. 7 from 9 
a.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday, 
from 9 am. to 6 plm. 



The CONNECTION/PADS 
(Public Action to Deliver Shelter) 
program is ready on October 1 to 
begin it's seventh season serving 
the homeless people of Lake 
County. Over 2,400 trained volun- 
teers from local congregations, 
organizations and groups will be 
providing shelter, food and hospi- 
tality during the cold weather 
months to individuals and families 
who have no place to call home. 

There arc PADS shelters locat- 
ed in Antioch, Grayslake, Gurnec, 
Libertyvillc, Lindenhust, 

Mundclcin, Wauconda, 

Waukcgan and Wildwood. They 
open at 7 p.m. and close at 7 am. 



from October 1 through April 30. 
There are at least two and some- 
times three shelters open each 
night They arc located in 14 
churches and one park district 
facility. Dinner and breakfast arc 
provided.. Guests are also given a 
sack lunch before leaving in the 
morning. Individuals and fami- 
lies needing a place to spend the 
night are welcome on a first- 
come basis. Limited shuttle bus 
service is provided from the 
Township Office in downtown 
Waukcgan to the outlying shel- 
ters that guests would otherwise 
not be able to reach. 

PADSf daytime resource cen- 



ter at 214 S. Genesee in down- 
town Waukcgan is open all year 
long to provide outreach help for 
PADS guests seeking guidance 
for employment, housing, health 
care, etc. to help themselves out 
of homclessncss. PADS+ is open 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 

Special orientation classes are 
available to prepare anyone over 
IS who is interested in becoming 
a PADS volunteer. Orientations 
are scheduled at the College of 
Lake County on October 11 from 
7 to 9 p.m. For more information, 
call the CONNECTION/PADS 
office at 362-3381. 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Friday 



For insurance 
call 

Dick Witt 
395-1089 



IState Fam lisuraoce Compute 
Hose Offices Blooatogtoa, llliiob 



ll.ii Mia 



10 a.m.- 
10 p.m. 



8 p.m. 



Auto-ber Feast, *94 
'95 auto sate on 
Toft and Orchard 
Streets 

PM&L presents 
'Annie.' 395-3055 

Ballroom dance 
classes begin. 
Sponsored by the 
Antioch Parks 
Department. 395- 
2160 



Saturday 



8 




BARK 'N* TOWN 
KENNELS 

| Jy 'Booiding |_ 
•Grooming -Pet Supplies 

"Your PrlS Nv'ik' 4iv.iy Fiom Horn.-' 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd. 
Inqleside *.*»• m.i 

* ft I Mi *- \i 

(815)385-0632 ,.;;;;::. 



Tuesday 



11 



7:30 p.m. Antioch Junior 
Women's Club 
meets at St. 
Stephens. 

Last day to register 
to vote In Nov. 8 
general election. 
395-1000 



10 a.m.- Auto-ber Feast "94- 
6 p.m. '95 auto sale on 

Toft and Orchard 

Streets 

. 11 a.m.- Park Avenue 
4 p.m. Antiques and Shop 
hosts artisan Bonnte 
Uterhardt, a Jewelry 
repair and 
appraisal specialist. 

8 p.m. PM&L presents 

"Annie." 395-3055 



Sunday 



2:30 p.m. PM&L presents 

■Annie.' 395-3055 



12 



Wednesday 

9 a.m.- Une dancing at 

10 a.m. Antioch Senior 

Center 



10:30 a.m. Slng-a-Iong at 
Antioch Senior 
Center 

Antioch Rescue 
Squad sponsors 
public CPR class. 
Call 395-0302 for 
reservations 



Thursday 



13 



Monday 



10 



12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center. 
Everyone over 60 
welcome 

7 p.m. Rational Recov- 
ery Self Help Net- 
work meets at 
Antioch Manor 
Apartments 

No school In 
observance of 
Columbus Day 



6 p.m. Lake County Busi- 
ness and Profes- 
sional Women hold 
monthly meeting at 
Lambs Farm. 587- 
4242 

7:30 p.m.- Country dancing at 
10:30 p.m. VFW hall. $4 per 
person 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Planning 
and Zoning Com- 
mission meets 






Coming Up: 

Oct. 15 Homecoming 

1 a.m. parade on Main 

Street 

Oct. 15 VFW Post 4551 

9 a.m.- Antioch holds 

4 p.m. holiday craft 

and show— Hallo- 

Oct. 1*6 ween, Thanks- 

1 1 a.m.- giving and Christ- 
4 p.m. mans— Door 

prizes, refresh- 
ments. Dorothee, 
395-6934 



GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL US! Tina Reulbach 223-8161. 




t| COMMUNITY UIceIancI Newspapers Octobtn 7, 1994 






V 

r ' 

i 












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■..-& 



From tIhe Cap-taL 



US Cong. Philip M. Crane (R) 



People should decide health care 




Some of the 
best news the 
American 
people heard 
this year was 
the announ- 
cement that 
the Demo- 
crats in the 
Senate had 
given up on 
efforts to pass 
the health 
care package proposed by President 
and Mrs. Clinton. Mouse Democrats 
had thrown in the towel earlier. 

After months of reports from 
across the country that the peo- 
ple did not want the Clinton 
health care package passed into 
law, the Democratic congression- 
al leadership finally gave in to the 
wishes sounded from outside of 
the Washington Beltway. 

The victory for the American 
people now gives them the 
opportunity to decide at the polls 
in November what type of health 
care package they prefer. 

Under the Clinton plan, indi- 
viduals would no longer have 
been able to decide what type of 
insurance policy was best for 
them. The government would 
have defined a standard benefit 
plan that it believed was "best" 
for every American. Nor would 
they have been allowed to have 
the doctor of their choice. 



three-tiered health care structure 
which, at the very least, would 
have established 75 new govern- 
ment agencies and commissions 
at the state and federal level. 

Coverage for abortion was 
mandated. 

And at what cost were we to 
accept Mr. and Mrs. Clinton's 
health care proposals? 

It would have cost over $700 
billion in five years, and would 
have given government control to 
over one-seventh of our econo- 
my. 

There were over $150 billion in 
new taxes, $200 billion in 
Medicare and Medicaid spending 
cuts, and a payroll tax of 7.9 per- 
cent on employers and 3.9 per- 
cent on workers. 

It would have cost from 
049,000 to almost four million 
Americans their jobs. Illinois 
would have tost 48.900 jobs, with 
a cost of $4.8 billion in lost wages 
and benefits. 

In the next Congress, 
Republicans will try again to put 
forward their health care pack- 
age. 

Among items Republicans 
want are medical savings 
accounts and the permitting of 
tax-free IRA withdrawals for the 
purchase of long-term care insur- 
ance policies. 

We believe there should be 
coverage of pre-existing condi- 



The Clinton plan proposed a tions and coverage when a work- 

Allendale annexation 
short of needed votes 



ALEC JUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

The ordinance approving the 
Allendale Annexation didn't have 
enough votes to stand. 

The village board voted 4-2 in 
favor of it but the vote required a 
super majority of at least five votes 
for the measure to be adopted. 
Trustees Bill Efnnger and James 
McDonald voted against the ordi- 
nance which would have annexed 
40 acres into the village, approved 
an annexation agreement and 
rezoncd the property. 

"I don't want the police to be 
called every third day," Effinger 
said. "They almost have more staff 
than students." 

Voting for the issue was Mayor 
Frank Loffrcdo and Trustees 
Robert Raukohl, Bill Smolarchuck 
and Ken Lipski. Trustee David 
Dykstra was absent 

McDonald said he wanted 
more time to review changes made 
after last week's committee meet- 
ing so he voted 'no.' 

The board had considered the 



issue for about two months. 
Allendale was seeking permission 
to annex 40 acres west of the village 
to allow the school a new campus 
structure. 

Allendale is a school for youth 
with special emotional needs. The 
day school students come from all 
over Lake and McHcnry Counties. 

Allendale is planning to take an 
existing building and move it to the 
40-acre site and also provide addi- 
tional parking. It would renovate 
the existing area, provide addition- 
al parking and make a large struc- 
ture on the existing site. 

The school was seeking a 
change in zoning from Residential- 
2 to Agricultural/ Institutional. The 
change would allow the school 
flexibility in allowing such things as 
a thrift shop or a greenhouse. 

The agricultural zoning would 
also prohibit someone from buying 
the property and begin building 
homes. 

The board approved a motion 
to reconsider the issue at a special 
meeting scheduled for Oct 5. 



Women's Club takes 'Hats off to fall' 

The Antioch Christian Women's Club is holding a "Hats Off to Pall: 
luncheon on Oct. 20 from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Waterfalls, 24436 
Rte. 173, Antioch. 

Hats for All Occasions will be presented by Jo Rcid, along with a 
Musical Chapcau by vocalist Theresa Klugicwicz. 

Nursery services provided for children ages 10 and under. For 
reservations, call Pam at 223-6085 or Mary at 587-7908 by Oct. 13. 



What's Happening? 

Lakeland Newspapers Is looking for items to be listed each week In 
our Community Calendar feature. Items such asclub and organization 
announcements, meetings, church socials, special events, etc. Send 
Items to Tina Reutbach, Lakeland Newspapers. 30 S. Whitney St.. 
Grayslake, IL 60030, 



or is moving from one job to 
another. 

And we want to allow small 
businesses to pool their employ- 
ees to lower the cost of purchas- 
ing health insurance. 

Mrs. Clinton played a major 
role in making the American peo- 
ple suspicious of what she and 
her husband had in mind when 
she balked at publicly disclosing 
the names of her task force mem- 
bers and at releasing documents. 

And who wouldn't be suspi- 
cious of a plan which needed 
1,342 pages to spell out how 
health care would be provided to 
Americans? 

The folly of the Clinton plan 
may well be best summed up by 
the fact that there was not so 
much as one test vote on the floor 
of either the House or the Senate 
on this huge bureaucratic mess, 
even though Clinton's political 
party had solid control of the 
Senate and an 80-votc majority in 
the House. 




Riding into Indian summer 

Phil Jackson of Antioch enjoys a Indian summer ride at Lewis 
Park.— Photo by Andy Konralh 



ElGWwle**^ 




Dealers Want You To 





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OcTobtn 7, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 





Arsuioch 
October brings 



and excitement to Antioch 



October is a month of growth 
in downtown Antioch. Along 
with the cool weather you'll 
experience new shops and inter- 
esting events happening in 
Antioch, If you haven't done so 




yet, make sure you stop by to 
welcome Antioch's newest 
shop— Tribes. You'll find it on 
Lake St. between The Tulip Patch 
and the Antioch Theatre. Tribes 
brings to Antioch the folktales of 



Golf league names award winners 



Antioch's Tuesday Ladies Golf 
League, sponsored by the State 
Bank of the Lakes, ended its sea- 
son on Sept. 20 with an awards 
day tournament at Bonnie Brook 
Golf Course in Waukegan. 

Special awards were given to 
the first and second place win- 
ners in each flight The first place 
winners were Pauline Bullock-— A 
flight; Diane Lawrence— B flight; 
Carol Pavclski— C flight; Doris 
Mlttclheuser— D flight; and Chris 
Berles— E flight 

The second place winners 
were Lorraine Blackman— A 



flight; Trudy Anderson— B flight; 
Kris Murphy— C flight, Nancy 
Preston— D flight; and Kathy 
Shaughncssy — E flight 

Carol Pavclski was honored 
with the award for most 
improved player. Special recogni- 
tion was 'given to their lowest 
handicapped player, Joan Casey, 
who is moving and will be leaving 
the league.. She will be greatly 
missed. 

Anyone wishing to join next 
year's league should contact 
Marge Warner, the league presi- 
dent, at 395-0091. 




First place winners: from toft, Chris Berles, "E" flight; Doris 
Mlttelheuser, "D" flight, Carol Pavelskl, "C" flight; Diane Lawrence, 
"B" flight, Pauline Bullock, "A" flight, Florence Babachek, sponsor. 




Second place flight winners Include from left, Florence Babachek, 
sponsor; Lorraine Blackman. "A" flight; Trudy Anderson, "B" flight; 
Kris Murphy, "C" flight; Nancy Preston, "D" flight; Kathy 
Shaugrmossy, "E" flight. 



ti 



mmik 
C7hr 




Lake Marie ESSSE^ 

Antioch FACTORY AUTHORIZED 



EAST 
MARINA 



SALES & SERVICE 



I YAMAHA i 



OUTBOAFOS 

1994 CLOSE-OUTS 

Pontoon Boats & Trailers 
Bass Boats - Yamaha Outboards 

All Remaining Inventory to be 

sold at dealer cost 

Prices have never been this low 

and will not be again 

Nice selection still available 

lfird down .will hold your boat 

for Spring delivery 




with this coupon i 

Boat Storage with Shrink-Wrap | 

Complete Winterizing 
Bottom Wash (no lift charge) 

I Call now for our special ratesj 



the Native American. Indian. 
Specializing in true artifacts of 
native Indians, it gives you. a 
sense of history and knowledge 
of the original Indian culture that 
once so freely roamed our area. 

Mid-October brings the arrival 
of Creative Glass in Its hew loca- 
tion on Main St between Leaves of 
Garth and Las Vegas Restaurant 
The Extncr family brings the art of 
glass etching to downtown 
Antioch. They offer a vast selection 
of gifts for both corporate and 
individual occasions. 

In late October the doors to 
the new Williams Brothers 
Emporium should be open. 
Williams Brothers Emporium is 
located on Main St. in the old 
True Value building. Extensive 
renovations arc underway, which 
brings back to Antioch some of 
the old-world charm that we 
miss, This promises to be a haven 
of delight for antique lovers and 
dealers. Featuring antiques, col- 
lectibles and crafts allows an 



interesting array or merchandise 
for practically everybody. There 
is still a bit more space available 
for dealers, so be sure to contact 
them right away. You can send 
inquires to Williams Brothers 
Emporium at P.O. Box 732, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 

October marks the grand 
opening of another new business 
in Antioch — Elite Embroidery, 
located on Main St between 
Choosey Child and the Village 
Pub. Elite Embroidery was for- 
merly known as Antioch Sports. 
Although they are operating 
under a new name, they certainly 
aren't newcomers to Antioch. 
Providing personalized apparel 
and gift items through embroi- 
dery allows you to choose a gift 
that is completely personalized 
for any occasion. Weddings, 
birthdays, anniversaries and 
births arc just a few opportunities 
for giving a truly personalized gift. 

You've probably already 
noticed the transformation 



October has made on J. J. 
Blinkers, located, on Main St. 
Although they arc still a great 
place for "clownln" around," this 
is the month they fill up with 
creepy spooks, ghouls and mon- 
sters. Just walking in brings shiv- 
ers of terror as you glance around 
at their costume and accessory 
displays. You'll find costume 
rentals and sales for the ; latest 
"hip" costume or the old "tried 
and true" costumes of yesteryear. 
Reserve your rentals early to 
guarantee availability. Don't wait 
till the witching hour or else your 
favorite spook might have 
already gone "a-haunting." 

There's still more. In October, 
something very special happens . 
on Orchard Street — the arrival of 
Transylvania Twist at Baskin 
Robbins. 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is a 
weekly newsletter showcasing 
Antioch's merchants and retail- 
ers. Prepared and written by 
Barbara Porch of Choosey Child. 



NOW'S THE TIME 
TO GET AWAY FROM PRIME 

WITH 

STATE BANK OF THE LAKES 

FIXED RATE HOME EQUITY INSTALLMENT LOANS 




RATES FROM 

•8.40% APR TO 9.40% APR* 

•TERMS FROM 1 TO 10 YEARS* 

•NEXT DAY APPROVAL* 

•SEVEN DAYS TO CLOSE* 

START UP COSTS AS LOW AS »50.00* 



YOU CAN REST EASY KNOWING 
YOUR INTEREST RATE WILL NEVER CHANGE! 



SIMPLY CONTACT A MORTGAGE OR CONSUMER LENDING OFFICER IN 
ANTIOCH, LINDENHURST OR OUR NEW GRAYSLAKE OFFICE 
NEW ADVANCES OF ■S.OOO OR MORE. 

'HUM APPRAISAL TITLE AND RECORDING FEES FOR AMOUNTS UNDER CM400 

1100.00 APPRAISAL TITLE AND RECORDING FEES FOR AMOUNTS 

BETWEEN HO.VM AND 1100,000 

(Otttr Ettetlltr Tk»«f I Orfatrr J I, I9!U) 




?«■ Lakes Region community banking far over 100 years 
Antioch - Qrayslake - Undenhurst 





LINDENHURST 

2031 t Grand Avenue 
UndenhuriiJL 60046 
(708) 356 5700 



GRAYSLAKE ANTIOCH 

50 Commerce Driw 440 Lake Street 

Grayilde, II 60030 Antioch, IL 60002 

(708) 5482700 (708) 395-2700 



m 



VI 4 




3 COMMUNITY UkclANd Newspapers OcTobea. 7, 1994 






■ 

\ 
I 



F { 

\i'r 



Y ' 
'-■ t 



* i 









i 
i 

•I! 



Tribes owner lauds 
LeMere, village 



Staff Reporter 

The owner of Tribes, a new Native American shop in Antioch, 
heaped praise on Antioch's Downtown Development Director Claude 
LeMere at the village board meeting. Ray Gordon, the owner of the 
store, said he had visited other villages before settling in Antioch, 

Gordon was impressed with Antioch's commitment to local mer- 
chants. "He (LeMere) presented a package of what Antioch will do for 
me," said Gordon. 

Gordon's store, Tribes, features Native American products and arti- 
facts "straight from my nation," Gordon is a Cherokee Indian who for- 
merly had his store In Lake Villa. 

"Lake Villa basically told me "you arc on your own"," explained 
Gordon of his move to Antioch. Gordon told the board he also visited 
other villages such as Libcrtyville, who only offered a sign. 

A grand opening of the new store Is scheduled for Oct 15 although the 
store has been open late in the week and on weekends. "Sixty-five people 
came through my store on the day I opened," said Gordon proudly. 

Besides offering Native American items, Gordon also hopes to edu- 
cate residents about his people. 

"My main purpose is to educate people," said Gordon. "To make peo- 
ple aware of the truth about the Native American people." Gordon is plan- 
ning various seminars, workshops, and to also speak at area schools. 




Issue 



From page Al 

enrollment In the detached area 
to the total student enrollment in 
the district- from which it is 
detached and the .percent of 
equalized assessed valuation in 
the detached area to total equal- 
ized assessed valuation of the dis- 
trict from which it is detached is 
greater than 8 percent . . ." 

When asked who will be able to' 
vote on the issues, Regional 
Superintendent Ed Gonwa said he 
did not have the figures verified yet 
There is a statue regulating affect- 
ed areas," said Gonwa. "The Lake 
County Clerk's office has to apply 
the statute." 

However, a representative 
from the Clerk's office Instead 
believes it will be the job of the 
State's Attorney's office. "I'm still 
waiting to get a definite answer," 
said the representative. "It is 
being researched through the 
State's Attorney's office." 

Lake County Clerk Linda Hess 
said she can't determine who is 
voting at this time because she 



doesn't have all the information. 

Among the questions Is exact- 
ly what percentage of students 
who live in each affected district 
would be in the unit district 

Hess stated her office is 
focused on the November elec- 
tion and won't have an answer on 
who votes until after the 
November election and the issue 
has been reviewed by the Gonwa 
and the State's Attorneys office. 

Hess said she has no experi- 
ence with a unit district vote but 
has worked on a municipal con- 
solidation vote. 

When the calculations are final- 
ly completed there will be three 
issues voters will need to address, 
although, not all voters in the 
affected districts will vote on all 
three. A certainty is those residents 
that will be in the new district, 
assuming passage, will vote on the 
school district proposition, the 
bond issue, and the election of 
school board members. 

Other residents will only vote 
on the proposition itself. 



'Annie's* last weekend 

This Is the last weekend of play for PM & L's "Annie." Among the show's highlights are the 
performances of the orphans. Back row: Alexis Hachmelster, Amanda Sllker, Amber Duzak, 
Coumtey Winding, Courtney Brady, Jessica, Smouse, Front left: Colleen Badtke, Michelle Mann 
and Stephanie Hamel. The For ticket Infomratlon call 395-3055. 



Park Avenue sponsors china expert 



Park Avenue Antique Shops 
will be featuring John Eusticc 
Oct. 8 from 11 am, to 4 p.m. to 
provide advice about- china 
repair. Eustice is an expert in 
china and was a designer for 
Pickard China. 

Eustice was born in 1925 in 
Rewcy, Wis. He obtained a 
degree in Art Education from 
the University of Wisconsin. He 
went on to complete his 
advanced studies at the New 



York State College of Ceramics 
In Alfred, New York. After his 
education, Eusticc taught 
ceramics and began his career 
in china design. 

After working for both 
Castlcton China and Lenox, 
Eustice began his association 
with Pickard China on a free- 
lance basis in 1958. Eustice 
became a permanent employee 
for Pickard in 1961. 

Because he was equally adept 



at sculpting new shapes or 
designing new patterns, Eusticc 
made a number of important 
contributions to Pickard. Most 
notably, Eusticc developed one of 
Pickard's best selling patterns, 
Brocade. 

Eustice is also an accom- 
plished musician and has played 
the organ professionally for most 
of his life. Though retired today, 
he is known and admired by 
many collectors. 



Scouts to serve 34th spaghetti dinner 



Nabs 



From page Al 

search the entire vehicle from the 

State's Attorney's Office, 

Somcrville went on to discover a 

pound of marijuana in Malone's 

trunk. 

According to Watkins, 
Malone's beeper is still going off 
in the police station. "The 
Antioch Police Department has 
petitioned the court for a seizure 
order for the pager and the 
$10,000," said Watkins. 

John Dixon of the State's 
Attorney's Office said his office is 
working on the petition. Dixon 
said Antioch would get a portion 
of that money if it is proven it was 



used or obtained in connection 
with drug dealing. 

Malone's girlfriend had two 
blackened eyes and a rib injury. 
However, she refused medical 
attention and told police she 
would be attended by her person- 
al physician. 

Bond for Malonc was initially 
set at $200,000 but was reduced 
to $50,000. Malonc was released 
after posting the necessary 10 
percent. His preliminary hearing 
is Oct. 14. Malonc is facing a 
maximum of 14 to 15 years of 
incarceration. "It could be more 
depending on his priors," said 
Dixon. 



Antioch's Boy Scouts of America 
Troop 92 34th Annual Spaghetti 
Dinner will be held on Sunday, 
October 16. The "all you can eat 
dinner" will be at the Loyal Order of 
Moose Lodge 525 located at 884 
North Main Street in Antioch. 

The meal includes spaghetti 
with meatballs, coleslaw, bread 
and butter, cake and beverage. 
Dinners will be served between 
noon and 7 p.m. but the best 
seating time is between noon and 
4:30 p.m. The donation is $4.50 
per person with children under 



six eating free. Tickets may be 
purchased at the door or in 
advance from any scout. Carry- 
out service will be provided but 
patrons arc asked to bring their 
own containers. , 

Guests arc eligible to win 
attractive door prizes with their 
dinner ticket, stubs but need not 
be present at the 7 p.m. drawing 
to win. Also, raffle tickets will be 
sold for other prizes awarded at 
drawings held throughout the 
day. Dave Edwards and Brian 
Paschke are Co-Chairpersons of 



the event. Chief chefs Hemic Dost 
and Harold Clark will he assisted 
in the kitchen by their merry 
band of sauce and noodle 
slingcrs. "Chief Bill Gcycr and 
"Squaw" Barb Brongcl will sell 
raffle tickets and Linda bind rum 
and Debbie Burgess will sell din- 
ner tickets. Proceeds from the 
dinner arc used to finance troop 
activities including campouts 
and field trips. 

Troop 92. is sponsored by 
Antioch's Loyal Order of Moose 
Lodge 525. 









, Taylor's Three begins folk music series 

Taylor's Three will be presented by Just Folks Music Company and . 
the Lake County Forest Preserves on October 15, at 7:30 p.m. as a part 
of the inaugural season of the Lake County Museum. Folk Concert 
Scries. Taylor's Three will sing and play original contemporary folk 
-'songs for one, two, and three voices with guitar, harp, and hammered 
dulcimer. Members include: Highland Park's Marcia Kricgcr, 

singer/songwritcr/guitarist; Dcbby Sanford, singer/folk harper of 
Mundclcin, and Bonnie Perry, singcr/ham-mered dulcimer also of 
Mundclein. Opening the concert will be Jeff Orrcll, songwriter/guitarist 
in his debut performance. 

Taylor's Three bring to the Lake County Museum stage a unique 
- combination of instruments, three part songs, and vocal harmonics 
which allow them to create the rich and unusual blend of voice and 
music for which they have become known. 

The Lake County Museum is located in the Lakewood Forest 
Preserve on Route 176, west of Fairfield Road near Wauconda. Ticket 
prices arc $5 adults, $2 students — Scries Pass available. For more infor- 
" mation, please phone (708)526-7878. 




Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graceland Baptist Church. 258 [da St., Antioch, It. 
Sunday School 1 1 am.,Momlng Worship 1 1 a.m.. 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

First Church of Ctiriat, Sciential * Heading Rm. RIa. 
173 and Harden, Anlloch. Phone (708) 395-1 196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 am. Wednesday, 
8 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 554 Parkway. Phone (708) 
395-3393. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday Worship 
1 1 a.m. and 7 p.m. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main St., Phone (708) 395- 
0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m., High Mass 9:30 a.m. Sunday 
School & Nursery 9:30 am. 

Antioch Evangelic*! Free Church. 42429 N. Tiflany Rd. 
Phone (708) 395-41 17. Sunday School 9:45 am., 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 1 1:00, 6:00, Children's Church 
11 am. Nursery both services. A wan a Club. 

SL Staph*! Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rta. 59. Phone 
(70S) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:15 & 10:30. 
Church School 9 a.m., Sunday The Rev. Charles E. 
Miller. Pastor. 

Christian Ufa Fellowship Assemblies of Qod Church. 
41625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (708) 395-8572. 
Sunday School (all ages) 9 a.m., Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m. .Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship. & 



Children's Program 7 a.m., Tuas. Women's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-1 1:30 a.m. Jell Brussafy, Pastor. 

Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SL Phone (708) 
395-1600. Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 a.m., Sunday 
School 9:25 am., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darafd Gruon, Rev. 
Gregory Herman son'. Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 
395-1664, 

Ml lib urn Congregational United Church of Christ 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rto. 45 Phone (70B) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 am. Children's program 10 am. Rev. 
Paul R, Meltter, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church ol Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phone (708) 395-1259. Worship al 8:30 a.m. & 10:45 
am. Church School - classes lor all ages. 9:30 a.m. The 
Rev, Kurt A. Gamlln, Pastor. 

SL Patera Church. 557 W. Lake St.. Antioch. Phone 
(708) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 8 am., 
Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor Rev. Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lakea Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd„ Anlloch, Phone (708) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youlh, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev, Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rts. 59 & 132), Lako Villa. (708) . 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 am.; Sunday 
School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Rev. John 
Zollmer, Paslor, Christian Preschool. 




Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 







Ociobtn 7, 1994 LaIceIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 




THIS WEEK 

Bovs 







Sequoits take 2nd at con-- 
ferehcemeet PAGE12A 



■ 



soccer 

Travel teams continue win- 
ningefibrts; PAGE 1 5A 

Vikings action 

Heavys, lights pound 
away. PAGE 1 5 A 

For More 

SpORTs/LEisURE 

See PAqEG27 



F doibAll SrANdiNqs 


/North Suburban 


... ' -." '■■ ' 


Conference 


'■■■-,■■ - < 




-, 


Conf. 


.Overall 


Ubertyville 


4-1 


5-1 


Stevenson 


4-1 


:'4-2^Y 


North Chicago- 


4-2 


4-2 


Warren 


13-2 


4-2 ; 


Antioch 


3-2 


3-3 


Zion-Benton 


'3-2 


3-3 


Mundeletn 


2-4 


2-4 


Lake Forest 


1-4 


1-5 


)Fcnton v / 


0-6 


. 0-6 



Northwest Suburban 
Conference 

..]■;?,;■: Conf. Overall 

Marian Central . 2-0 6-0 

Graytlakc ■ ;^l-te •;■ 2-4- '■< 

Wauconda 1-1 1-5. ... 

Round Lake 1-1 1-5 

Grant l-I ;I-5 

lohnsburg 0-2 0-6 

East Suburban Catholic 

Conference 

iConf. Overall 

SL Patrick 4-0 6-0 

Joliet Catholic 4-0 '5-1 

Marian Catholic 4-0 4-2- 

St Viator 3-1 4-2 - 

Marist 3-1 4-2 ; 

Carmel 1-3 -2v4 

Holy Cross" - 0-4 2-4 

NbtreDarne ^-3 1-5 

Benet Academy : 0-4 0-6 

SL Joseph , 0-4 0-6 

Boys, girls 
runners 




3rd y 4th 



Sequoit boys and girls 
cross country runners , fin- 
ished third and fourth respec- 
tivcly at their. own Invitational 
held at Fox River Park in Silver 
Lake^Wis. 

The boys finished third 
behind Crystal Lake Central 
and Benet Academy. Leading 
Antioch was Steve Spronlc 
whose 1 6:54 was good enough 
for fifth place. 

Other Antioch winners 

•placing in the top 25 included; 

Brian DeRue, 17th, 17:30; Ken 

>§Bratton;i 19th, 17:39;- Torn 

Murphy,\>22nd, 1 7:45; and 

Matt Fasana, 23rd, 17:48. 

Antiochgiris cross country 

runners \ finished \ fourth 

v, behind Benet Academy, 

Crystal Lake Central and 

Palatine Fremd.;;' 

Megan Durney led the 
Antiochgiris with a 12:41vand 
a fourth place. Beth Lcnnon 
took 13th with a 13:26, Lauren 
Burke finished 28th witti? a 
13:54, and Mandi Dale round- 
ed but me top 30 with a 1359. 

Both the boys and girls; 
cross country teams will be \ 
;; competing .at the Benet 
Academy Invitational Oct 8. 



Grant looks to build on W, Rams set for leaders 



Grant High's football team 
picked the right time to accom- 
plish something the Bulldogs had 
not done all game or seldom this 
year Saturday at Grayslakc. 

The Bulldogs put together a 
16-play, time-consuming touch- 
down drive that ended when 
Dave Stone plunged in from one- 
yard out with the game-winning 
touchdown. ; 

"I have to give credit to my 
assistants, Brian Kibitlewskl on 
defense and Fred Loffredo on of- 
fense. Fred had some excellent 
play-calling and took some time 
off the clock. The only touch- 
down they scored came after our 
fumble," Grant Coach Mark Bar- 
czak said. ■ 



"Stone slngle-handlcdly beat . 
us/' Rams Coach Dan Dillon said. 

Stone, the senior back, is a 
marked man for the Bulldogs 
offense, but still managed 119 
yards in 23 carries, the most 
Important yard coming in the 
final quarter of the 12-7 Grant 
win. 

"It is a tribute to him. He is 
our offense. He is even a weapon 
when he does not have the ball," 
Barczak said. 

The Bulldogs scored their first 
quarter touchdown when David 
Jakstas scored on a 43-yard quar- 
terback keeper. "The run-support 
defense all went to Stone's side," 
Barczak said. 

Of course, for every strong 



running back, there is a solid ' 
offensive line. 

"Our offensive line really got 
off the ball," Barczak said. . 

Mark Whitt, Jim Koch, Joe 
Smith, Brad Twarowski and tight 
end Phil Egicston all did an excel- 
lent job, the coach said. 

Defensively, Erick Rasch 
picked off a Rams pass early on 
and Joe Hill stopped the third 
down Rams play which set up the 
game winning 54-yard march. 

The Bulldogs, now 1-5, 1-1 
NVVSC, host Johnsburg at 1 p.m. • 
Oct. 8. 

The Rams slipped to 2-4, 1-1 
but still have high hopes. "We can 
still win the conference if we beat 
Marian Central and go 4-1 and 



someone knocks off Grant," 
Dillon said. 

But first, the Rams must find a 
way to solve problems during the 
Homecoming game spoiled by 
Stone and Co. 

"We cannot ask the defense to 
save us time and time again. We 
have to be able to get first 
downs," Dillon said. 

The Rams running game 
bogged down and the team had 
slightly less than 150 yards in 
total offense. 

"Br ian Witt and Joe Kerns 
keyed the defense. Kerns had two 
fumble recoveries. "He is unbe- 
lievable. He Is the most consis- 
tent defensive player we have," 
Dillon said. 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Hintz nails 35-yd. field goal in Antioch 



• After missing two previous 
chip shots for extra points, Antioch 
kicker Kurt Hintz came through as 
he nailed a 35-yd. field goal to give 
Antioch a 22-20 victory over Lake 
Forest 

"We squeaked it out," said 
Antioch Coach Del Pcchauer. 

With 40 seconds left in the con- 
test and Antioch down by a point 
20-19, Hintz's 35-yd. attempt 
cleared the goal posts for the 22-20 
lead and the eventual win. 

But the Lake Forest Scouts had 
some heroics of their own as Lake 
Forest quarterback Ryan Douglass 
lofted a desperate Hail Mary with 
time running out Douglass hit 
Derek Nelson at the Sequoit eight 
yardline. As Nelson broke for the 
end zone, Antioch defenders Jeff 
Mcdiema, Jason Brecn and Jim 
Stevens put the stop on Nelson 
before he reached the end zone. 

"We were playing a supef-prc- 
\ vent defense," said Pechauer, who 
noted the Hail Mary was reminis- 
cent of the Colorado-Michigan 
game the week before when 
Colorado's Hail Mary succeeded. 

Lake Forest's last-ditch effort 
was three yards short as lime 
expired, and the Scquoits celebrat- 
ed a tiirilling victory. 

"We were lucky enough to 
tackle the receiver at the goal line," 
Pcchauer said. 

It was a give-and-take game ail 
day, making it a thriller for specta- 
tors. 

Antioch began the scoring on a 
special teams effort Antioch's Rick 
Cork blocked a I.ake Forest punt, 
scooped up the loose ball and ran 
eight yards for the first score. 

Sequoit running back and 
part-time quarterback Dave Smith 
rushed for the second touchdown 
to give Antioch a 13-0 lead. Smith 
totaled 86 yards on die ground, 
while fellow running back Brad 
Rubash rushed for another 109 
yards. 

"Our off-tackle plays were 
working," Pechauer said. "We felt 

we could run as the game went 

«... •» 
on. 

After a first-half ending score, 
Lake Forest tied the game when 
Douglass kept the ball himself, ran 
to the outside and carried the ball 
into the end zone for a 30-yd TD. 

"They were able to get on the 
outside of us," Pechauer noted. 

Antioch regained the lead in 
the third quarter when Smith fin- 
ished a 67-yd scoring drive with a 
three-yard run. 

With the score 19-13 in 



Antioch's favor, Lake Forest scored 
its last touchdown on another 
Douglass keeper to give Lake 
Forest a 20-19 lead. But Hintz 
spoiled a homecoming victory for 
Lake Forest when he converted his 
35-yd field goal. 

Antioch travels to Lincolnshire 



Friday for its first night game 
against the Stevenson Patriots. 
Stevenson downed league-leading' 
North Chicago Saturday 35-18. 
Stevenson (4-2 overall, 4-1 NSC) 
has trampled over its opponents 
' since losing its first two games. 
"They're big and they're fast," 



Pcchauer said. Stevenson running 
backs Rob Lizska and Shea; 
Newcomb racked up 223 yards on 
the ground against North Chicago. 
"The only thing that beats 
them is their own mistakes. We 
hope they make some mistakes," 
Pcchauer said of Stevenson. 




Antioch's Dave Smith carries the ball across the goal line for one of his two touchdowns against Lake 
Forest. The Sequolts won In a 22-20 thriller.— Photo by Steve Young 

Sequoits soccer team peaking at right time 



Six different Scquoits found 
the net as Antioch shut out 
Mundclcin 6-0 in conference 
action. 

The Antioch soccer team 
strung together three wins in a 
row before facing Fenton on 
Thursday. By defeating 
Mundclcin, the Scquoits 
improved their North Suburban 
Conference record to 3-1 and 
their overall record to 13-3-1. 

Finding the net for Antioch 
were Mike Miclea, Cat 
Cruickshank, Mike Tschanz, Bill 
Johnson, Brian Weeks and Kevin 
Erickson. 

"People were just making 
good runs and stringing together 
some nice passes," said Soccer 
Coach Brad Wilson. 



Jon Zora also contributed to 
the offensive attack with 3 assists. 

"In many cases that impresses 
me more than the goals do by 
seeing the field and dishing the 
ball off," Wilson said of Zora's 
assists. 

Goalie Keith Jackson also 
recorded his second shutout in a 
row. Although Mundclcin only 
had four shots on goal, Wilson 
said Jackson's saves came at the 
right time. 

After posting a 1-0 shutout 
over Lake Forest and a 2-1 win 
over Stevenson, Jackson has only 
allowed one goal in three games. 
Weeks scored the lone goal 
against Lake Forest 

"We're being very positive 
about things," Wilson said. 



"We're not being critical of each 
other." 

After facing Fenton Thursday, 
Antioch hosts Zion-Benton Oct. 
11 and Warren Oct 12 at Policy ' 
Field. 

"We've got a tough game 
against Warren. They beat us last 
year," said Wilson, who added the 
Sequoits will move the hall 
around more and tighten up the 
defense against rival Warren. 

With three conference games 
left, Wilson said, "We're coming 
around and peaking at the right 
time." 

Antioch shares top NSC hon- 
ors with Stevenson and 
Ubertyville, the same three teams 
who shared the conference title 
last year. 




COMMUNITY UkElANcI Newspapers OcTobcR 7, 1994 



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Sequoit golfers make surprise 
bid at conference meet 



Antioch boys golfers fared well 
In the North Suburban Conference 
meet but missed the team cut at the 
regional meet held at Bonnie Brook 
inWaukcgan. 

Sequoit golfers scored a 345, 
nine strokes more than the 336 
qualifying score to advance on to 
the sectional. Stevenson (319) 
nipped Ubcrtyvillc (320) by a stroke 
for the regional title, while Lake 
Forest (321) and Warren (336) will 



also be heading to the sectional. 

"We didn't do as well as wc 
hoped," said golf Coach Roger Aim. 
Leading the Scquoits was Chris 
Passnrclln, who stroked a 7(1, which 
was good enough for him to com- 
pete at die sectional in individual 
play. The top 15 golfers at the 
regional advanced to the sectional 
Oct 11 Other leading golfers for 
Antioch were Charlie Miles (07), Art 
Wicklcin (88) and Bill Brattcn (92). 



Antioch spikers welcome 
cheering fans at away games 



^ * 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Going into the volleyball match 
at Mundclcin, the Scquoits brought 
along some extra friends. Antioch 
fans outnumbered Mundclcin fans 
at the away game. 

Unfortunately for the Scquoits, 
the Antioch cheering section was 
not enough against the powerful 
Mundclcin spikers who downed 
Antioch 15-5, 5-15, 15-0. 
• "Wc were ready. We've been 
ready since last year. It just didn't 
work out for us," said Katy Hamcy, 
who connected on 20 of 21 hits 
and was credited with kills. 

In the two matches Antioch 
lost, Mundclcin was able to jump 
out in front with early leads, 
which simmered down Antioch 
fans. In the crucial deciding 
game, the Mustangs scored the 
first 7 points. 

"One of the keys in the third 

. game was that we let them get in 

front. You can't do that against 

Mundclcin, so that hurt us," said 

Volleyball Coach Gwen Varney, 

Mundclcin Coach Dan 
Szymkowiak agreed that the key 
to Mundclcin's success was con- 
trolling the tempo. 

"We have to force the tempo," 
Szymkowiak said. "Wc did it in 
the first game. Wc did it in the 

third game. We didn't do it in the Scquoits, Varney said, "Thcr 
second game." good spirit here at Antioch." 



Aim said Miles hurt his back 
the night before the regional, 
making difficult for him to golf. 

"He was in a lot of pain. It was 
hard for him to golf," Aim said. 

Despite a subpar showing at 
the regional, Aim said he was 
happy with the team's perfor- 
mance at the conference meet 
held the week before. Antioch 
took second at conference with a 
315, four strokes behind Lake 
Forest (31 1) and one stroke ahead 
of Ubcrtyvillc (316). 

"We had a great conference 
meet. That. was exciting," Aim 
said, Antioch Finished the year 
fourth in the NSC with a 3-4 con- 
ference record and fl-5 overall. 

Aim said he looks forward to 



Girls Iceless Hockey 

Results of October 2 

Hull Div. Grade sl-2 



He also added that Antioch 
defenders were digging out all 

shots from Mundclcin's big three' next year. This year's relatively 
of Kandacc Kcsscl, Lynn T'Niemi young team racked up varsity 
and Cary Scholz which forced experience. "I think we'll do prct- 
them out of their power game. ty good next year," Aim said. "I've 

"They were expecting us to got a real young team." 
pound the ball, so wc did some 
more tipping," said Kesscl. 

Putting up the numbers for 
Antioch were Tricia Kccfc (10 
points, 16/16 serving) and 
Stephanie Montgomery (6 points, 
11/12 serving). Kccfc also had 7 
kills, while Carrie Curtis had 6 
kills and was good on 26 of her 20 
hits. In the setting department, 
Mary Ipscn was perfect with 41. 

"Wc played our hearts out," 
said Harney. "Now, we just have 
to get ready for Stevenson." 

Antioch shares second place 
in the conference (4-1, 13-8) with 
Mundclcin, while Stevenson is 
alone at the top of the North 
Suburban Conference. Antioch 
will play Stevenson on their last 
game of the year. 

The Scquoits faced Warren 
Tuesday and travel to Harlem 
Friday. 

"We're just looking to get back 
on track and get our intensity 
back up," Varney said. 

As far as those dedicated vol- 
leyball fans cheering on the 




Antioch golfer Chris Possarolla stroked his way to the Antioch 
Community High School "Athlete of the Week" award, co-sponsored 
by First Chicago Bank and Thelen Sand A Gravel. Passarella later 
shot a 76 at the conference meet and a 76 at the regional, qualify- 
ing for sectional play. Pictured with Passarella are Jeff Mulder, 
President of the First Chicago bank, and golf Coach Roger Aim. 



IceIess HockEy Scores 



Rangers 

Maple Leafs 

Blues 

Sabers 

Cougars 

Kings 



W 

1 
1 







T 


1 
I 





Pis. 

2 

2 

1 

1 " 





Blues 
Rangers 
Kings 
Sabers ■'■ 
Maple Leafs 



1 
1 



a 



o 
o 

l 
l 
l 











Patrick Dlv. Grades 5-6 



Savard Dlv. Grades 3-4 



Bruins 

Flyers 

Flames 

Nnrthstars 

Penguins 

Blackhawks 



1 

1 


6 

o 











1 
1 






1 
I 






Makita Dlv. Gradesl-2 



Flames 

Flyers. 

Blackhawks 

Bruins 

Penguins 

Norihsiars 



1 
1 













1 
1 






1- 

1 







Flyers 
Norths tars 
Blackhawks 
Ft ruins 
Flames 
Penguins 



1 
1 












1 
1 







1 
1 






2 
2 
1 
1 





Adams Div. Grades 5-6 



Gretzky Dlv. Grades 3-4 

Cougars 10 2 



Blues 

Maple Leafs 
Rangers 
Kings 
• Cougars 
Sabers 



1 
1 
1 










1 

1 
1 













2 
2 
2 






Campbell Div. Grades 7-8 

Sharks 3 6 

Bruins 2 1 4 

Blues 2 10 4 

Blackhawks 2 10 4 
Rangers 1 113 

Kings 2 11. 

Flames 2 11 

Flyers 2 11 

Results 

Blackhawks 5, Kings 2 
Bruins 4, Blues 
Rangers 1, Flyers 1 
Sharks 6, Flames 



VSB^tS' 



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Anf loch's Katy Harney stretches for the ball In match play. Antioch 
lost to Mundeteln. After facing Warren Wednesday, Antioch trav- 
eled to Harlem Friday.— Photo by Steve Young 



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AlltiOCh YikillSS Lmdeiihurst travel teams keep on kicking 

^^5 Lindenhurst Youth Soccer Glcnview Fillies this Sunday at Other Lindenhurst standout 

pound opponents 



lightweights 

Kenny Adcllizzi scored two 
TD's on 30-yard and 15-yard runs 
in a 26-0 game victory over 
Highland Park, 

Qulnn Gooch had a one-yard 
run for a TD. Adam Nilcs had a 
10-yard run. Nilcs and Chris 
Gundcrson had the extra point 

Nilcs turned the second half 
around with 50 yards rushing 
behind linemen Jarrad Ponce and 
Nick KoclnskL 

The defense was led by Joe 
Kennedy's fumble recovery and 
touch play by Brad Groth, 
Gundcrson and . Blake 

McClanahan, 

Both teams were 4-0 going 
into the game. 

Heavyweights 

The Heavyweights beat 
Highland Park 4-0 to stay unde- 
feated. 

Scores were by Chris Gawi in, 
Dan Shaughncssy, Matt Engram 
and Brian Birk. 

Outstanding line play by John 
Gollon, lose Perez and Jerry 
Hagan. 

The defense was led with 
interceptions by Gary Spillcr, 
Chris Browch and Brian Hagy. 

Middleweight 

Bears shut out Lake Zurich. 
Quarterback Ryan Smart led the 
offense to four TD's, two by Will 
Underbill on the ground and one 
by Kim Fleming. 

The defense held the opposi- 
tion to only one first down. Brian 
Pinkowski, Eugene Esser, Rich 
Brown, Rich Ward and Andy 
Wells led the defense. 



Featherweights 

The Raiders beat the 
Mundelein Broncos 32-7. 

Scoring was shared by quar- 
terback Mark Pumcll, who was 4- 
5 and 85 yards, with one TD to 
Jeff Johnannsen. 

Bobby Grasscr scored and had 
a fumble recovery. Pat Swanson, 
Mike Smith and Ryan Wiegcl also 
scored on defense. 

Justin McBride had three fum- 
ble recoveries, and Jeff Norwich 
hit everything in sight and had 
nine tackles. 

Pee Wee 

The Pee Wee White beat 
McHcnry 19-6 to move their 
record to 2-1-1. 

Mike Hayncs tallied three 

-times and quarterback James 

Kohlnieycr played well in the win. 

Chris Orozco and Doug 
Morgan had sacks, and the defen- 
sive line play of Jason Weigcl and 
Brett Cullen helped seal the win. 
Black 
'The Round Lake Spartans 
went clown to defeat to the 
Vikings 14-6. 

Justin Anderson tallied twice 
on runs of 39 years and six yards 
on handoffs from Eric Scsko. 
Extra points were scored by Trent 
Domel, who also had an intercep- 
tion. 

On defense, Kevin Mathcuson 
had three sacks, and Justin 
Anderson had two intercepts.' 
The Round Lake passing game 
scored once but was stopped in 
the second half. 

Taylor Hosick, Jesse Silva and 
Jcrrod Young played, tough 
defensively. 



Sequoit golfers finish eighth in conference 



The Antioch High School Lady 
Scquoits traveled to the U.S. 
Naval Air Base Golf Course in 
Glcnview for the Inter-Suburban 
Conference Tournament. 

The ACHS team score of 432 
was good enough for eighth place 
in the 11-tcam golf conference. 

Team scores in the meet 
included New Tricr-357, 
Waukcgan-364, Glenbrook 
North-390, Glenbrook South- 
403, Lihcrtyvillc-404, Rcgina 
Dominican-418, Lake Forest- 
421, Antioch-432, St. Viator-43fl, 
Evanston-546 and Decrfield- 
571. 

Looking at the final standings, 
Antioch coach Steve Wapon felt 
that, "We are making progress. 
This is the highest finish ever for 
an Antioch girls* golf team. Wcck- 
in and week -out our girls arc 
competing against outstanding 
high school golf programs in the 
toughest conference in the State 
of Illinois." Wapon added, "With 
four sophomores and two juniors 



in the varsity lineup, I am looking 
forward to an exciting 1995. sea- 
son." 

Scoring honors for the Sequoit 
Varsity were shared between 
Sarah Murphy 52/54-106 and 
Sarah Rockow 55/51-106. 

Other team scores for Antioch 
included Lisa Murphy 54/53-107, 
Kelly Pcriman 54/59-113J Angie 
Pcdcrson 53/64-117 and Marissa 
Blasko 77/64-141. 

The Antioch High School girls' 
golf team completed the regular 
season with tough losses to 
Waukcgan (233-173), Prospect 
(233-218), Libcrtyvilie (238-220) 
and Lake Forest (224-195). 

The losses left the Sequoits 
with a season record of six wins 
and 13 losses. 

Varsity scores in the 
Waukegan/ Prospect meet 

included Antioch Medalist Lisa 
Murphy-56, Sarah Rockbw-57, 
Jessica Shorc-58, Marissa Blasko- 
63, Angie Pcdcrson-68 and Kelly 
Periman-72. 






•X3 



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Lindenhurst Youth Soccer 
Girl's Traveling Teams 
Enigma (11-19) 

The Enigma worked their 
record to 2-0-2, with a 1 -1 tic with 
Trevian Green. 

The Enigma led on a goal by 
Jaime Porter that she headed in 
off a pass by Tanya Wiewcl. 

Trevian came back to tie and 
held off the Enigma until the final 
whistle. 

Blitz (U- 16) 

On a windy day In Napcrvillc, 
the Blitz won their fourth straight 
game remaining undefeated. The 
NSA Lightning fell to the Blitz by 
a score of 5-2. 

Becca Blcyer led the scoring 
with four goals on the day, two in 
the first half on pinpoint passes 
from Carrie Gpfron. 

Later in the first half, Erin 
Sparkman scored on a pass from 
Blcyer to stake the Blitz to a 3-0 
lead at halftime. 

After completely dominating 
the first 40 minutes, Lindenhurst 
spent the opening of the second 
half backed up in their own 
defensive zone. The Lightning 
managed to score twice, sending 
a wake up call to the Blitz. 

Lindenhurst proceeded to 
take control with several quality 
scoring chances. Blcyer then 
scored twice on assists from 
Allison Earl and Jill Denoma to 
put the game out of reach. 

Once again it was a Blitz team 
effort with excellent play by Tami 
Wright, Nicki Krai, Stacey Alberts, 
Katie Hoskins, Sondra Lorang, 
Melissa Helbig and Elly Elfering. 

The Blitz (4-0) face the 



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Glcnview Fillies this Sunday at 
Policy Field. 

Power (11-14) 

The Alithsa Blazers came to 
windy Policy Field to face the 
Power, with the game ending in a 
0-0 tic. The Power kept on the 
-attack through most of the game, 
but just missed finding the net. 

The Power had excellent mid- 
field play from Cara Robinson 
and Kristen Hungarlahd, while 
defensive standouts Kristen 
Gamlin and Esther Schuercr shut 
down the Alithsa attack. The 
Power is now 1-1-1. 

Stars (U- 14) 

The Stars met Team Elmhurst _ 
at Policy Field, beating them 2-1. ' 

Lindenhurst came back to win 
after allowing Elmhurst to tie the 
game 1-1 early in the second half, 

Amle Carlberg scored unas- 
sisted, and Mandy Fasano put in 
the winner with an assist from 
Sarnie Korbal. 

Susan Gosciniak was tough in 
goal with help from Angela 
Tournis, Amie Smit, Mcgen 
Rinkcnbcrger, Cheri Case and 
Amanada Calvert. 

Traveling to Naperville, the 
Stars manhandled the Rangers by 
a score of 3-0, The first 10 min- 
utes found both defenses taking 
control, but the first Lindenhurst 
goal opened the door for the 
three unanswered scores. 

Scoring for the Stars were Amie 
Carlberg, Sarnie Korbal and Megs 
Kotlarz. Assisting were Emily 
Ayre, Amanda Calvert and Mandy 
Fasano. Once again, Susan 
Gosciniak was strong in goal. 



Other Lindenhurst standouts 
were Natalie Richter, Amie Smit, 
Sarah Rimkus, Cheri Case and 
Maureen Moran. The Stars 
improve their record to 3-1-1; 

lightning (U-12) 

The girls' U-12 Lightning came 
from behind twice to tie the Fox 
Valley Strikers 2-2 In Geneva. 

Fox Valley had beaten the 
Lightning in their previous two 
meetings by a combined score of 
7-2. Making the tie even more 
notable was that the Lightning 
were without two key players. 
One of those was Kelly Gofron, 
who went to the hospital with a 
severe knee injury suffered early 
in the first half. 

The Lightning will put their 2- 
1-1 record on the line when Mt. 
Prospect comes to town on 
Sunday. 

Royal Eagles (Ul 1) 

The Lindenhurst U-ll Eagles 
travel soccer team flew like eagles 
with a 7-2 win over the Hinsdale 
Strikers. The team got it all 
together, keeping the ball in the 
offensive end. Adam Placko had 
(5) goals, Tommy Woodruff and 
Brian Walsh each had one. 

Brian Walsh had (3) assists, 
Kaleb Barrett and Tommy 
Woodruff each had one each. 
Everyone contributed in this game. 

Rockets (U- 10) 

The Rockets motored to 
Northbrook and came away with 
a 1-1 tie. Lindenhurst was trailing 
1-0 when Stephanie Will ding tied 
the score on a pass from Kristina 
Gopp. 




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COMMUNITY LaI<eIancJ Newspapers OcTobt* 7, 1 994 






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Grant Bulldogs celebrating 
homecoming this weekend 



TINA L SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

This weekend students at 
Grant Community High School 
will be celebrating the annual 
homecoming event. 

All week long students have 
been p;anticipating in Spirit 
Week, wearing various theme 
outfits and of course the school 
colors — red and white. 

On Friday, a pep rally will be 
held in the gymnasium at 1:35 
p.m. and there the homecoming 
king and queen will be crowned. 
Afterwards the usual window 
painting and decoration through- 
out town will take place. 

Some changes have been 
made this year including holding 
the pep rally in the afternoon 
instead of at night. Also fireworks 
which were displayed in the past 

Fresh produce 
needed to feed 
the hungry 

Families and county farmers 
who find themselves with excess 
produce such as onions, carrots, 
potatoes, apples, pears and other 
not readily perishable food prod- 
ucts arc urged to share their sur- 
plus with the less fortunate of 
Lake County. 

The Lake County Food 
Resource Council, an umbrella 
organization of county food 
pantries and soup kitchens, will 
serve as a clearing-house to dis- 
tribute food items to agencies 
requesting help. 

In 1993, over 450,000 meals 
were provided to the hungry by 
Lake County food pantries, soup 
kitchens and the PADS program. 

Currently, pantries and soup 
kitchens are in great need of food 
and volunteers to help feed the 
ever increasing numbers of fami- 
lies seeking help. 

As the Food Resource Council 
is a not-for-profit organization, 
all those donating food will 
receive a letter of thanks to docu- 
ment their donation. 

Por more information, or if 
you wish to contribute to the 
cause, please call 441-2930 and 
leave a message. 



Need a New 

Set of Wheels? 

Motor on to the 

. Transportation 

Section of this 

Week's Classifieds 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The VILLAGE OF ANT1 
OCH will be flushing 
hydrants between October 
9, 1994 and October 31, 
1994. Flushing will occur 
between the hours of 8:00 
A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday 
thru Friday. Signs will be 
posted in each area before 
flushing begins. It is advised 
that no laundry be done 
between these hours when 
flushing occurs. 

Also, it is advised that 
water be visually tested fo 
rust before doing laundry, 
FOR MORE INFORMA 
HON, CALL (708) 395-1881 
1094A-209-AR 
October 7, 1994 



have been eliminated this year. 

Friday evening, an informal 
dance with a western theme is 
scheduled In the commons area; 
and on Saturday Oct. 8 at 9 a.m. a 
parade will take place starting at 
the high school parking lot and 
working its way to the Lakeland 
Plaza. 

The theme for this year's 
homecoming is the "Year of the 
Bulldog." 

The football game is sched- 
uled at II a.m. Saturday begin- 
ning with- the sophomores 
against Johnsburg High School, 
.and then the varsity will take on 
the Skyhawks. 

Students will celebrate after 
the games Oct. 8 with a formal 
homecoming dance in the audi- 
torium from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 
p.m. Decorations will represent 
the '20s; '50s; 70s and the future. 




Up in smoke 

Lake County officials confiscated and burned an estimated S3.5 million worth of marijuana 
which was seized In a four-day span In Lake County. Metropolitan Enforcement Group officials 
burned 410 plants In Mundelein Oct. 3 and 380 plants found In a field southwest of Ihe Intersec- 
tion of Rfe. 12 and Case Road In Wauconda Township, Sept. 30.— Photo courtosy of MEG. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

The following parcels of property/ acquired through the Tax Sale 
Certificate Program, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 
Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax 
Extension Department, Room 601, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois 
60085. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 days after the initial bid. After 
completion of the 30 day period, the County has the right to accept the 
highest bid or to reject it if the amount is insufficient or if the sale would 
not be in the best interest of Lake County Taxpayers. 

Linda lanuzi Hess 
Lake County Clerk 
UNINCORPORATED LAKE VILLA 60046 

37153 N.Granada Blvd. 06-02-323-010 

35248 N. Grant Ave. 07-18-300-012 

1094A-213-LV 
October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The Libertyville Site Master Plan will be the subject of a public meet- 
ing to be held on October 18 from 7-9 p.m. at the Libertyville Civic 
Center, 135 West Church Street, Libertyville, Illinois. The public is invit- 
ed to view the proposed Master Plan for the 1,106-acre preserve which 
features a 113-acre lake created from the restoration of a gravel pit. 
Forest Preserve staff will be on hand to answer questions. 

Proposed improvements include a visitors center with food service, 
special events area, swimming beach, volleyball, family picnic area, 
boat and bicycle rentals, canoe launch, scuba, fishing, skating, trails 
and shelter available by reservation. Reforestation, as well as restora- 
tion of prairie and wetland areas on the site are also pari of the pro- 
posed Master Plan. 

For additional information concerning the public meeting or the pro- 
ject, please contact the Planning, Conservation and Development 
office of the Lake County Forest Preserve District at (708) 680-6301. 

1094A-203-LV/MN 
October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the Estate of 

SOPHIE MASILUNAS No. 94 P 791 

Deceased ■ 

CLAIM NOTICE 
Notice is given of the death of SOPHIE MASILUNAS of Antioch, 
Illinois. Letters of office were issued on August 29th, 1994, to Kenneth 
M. Clark, 425 Lake St., Antioch, Illinois 60002 whose attorney is himself. 
Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085 Room 
C-104 or with representative, or both, on or before March 30, 1995 
which date is not less than six months from the date of the first publi- 
cation of this notice and any claim not filed within that period is barred. 
„ Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to 
the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it is filed. 
FILED: Aug. 29, 1994 0994E-179-AR 

Sally D. Coffelt, Circuit Clerk September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 
October 14, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the Estate of 

ALTA MAE TURNER No. 94 P 792 

Deceased 

CLAIM NOTICE 
Notice is given of the death of ALTA MAE TURNER of Antioch, 
Illinois. Letters of office were issued on August 29th, 1994, to THOMAS 
F. TURNER, 11514 4th Ave., Kenosha, Wl 53143 whose attorney is 
KENNETH M. CLARK, 425B Lake Street, Antioch, Illinois 60002. 

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the 
Circuit Court at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085 Room 
C-104 or with representative, or both, on or before March 30, 1995 
which date is not less than six months from the date of the first publi- 
cation of this notice and any claim not filed within that period is barred. 
Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to 
the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it is filed. 

0994E-180-AR 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 

The following parcels of property, acquired through the Tax Sale- 
Certificate Program, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 
Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax 
Extension Department, Room 601 , 18 N. County St, Waukegan, Illinois 
60085. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 days after the initial bid. After 
completion of the 30 day period, the County has the right to accept the 
highest bid or to reject it if the amount is insufficient or if the sale would 
not be in the best interest of Lake County Taxpayers. 

Linda lanuzi Hess 
Lake. County Clerk 
UNINCORPORATED ANTIOCH 60002 

22085 W. Calvin Dr. 02-21-405-011 

25492 W. Clinton Ave. 01 -24-41 1-001 

22264 W. Lee Dr. 02-21-409-033 

1094A-217-AR 
October 7, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION 
OF Bonnie Kathleen McLain, 
minor, by parent Kim Cathie Chapin 
FOR 
CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBUCATION 
Notice is hereby given that on November 15, 1994, being one of the 
return days' in the Circuit Court of the County of Lake, I will file my 
Petition in said Court praying for the change of my name from Bonnie 
Kathleen McLain to that of Bonnie Lynn Chapin, pursuant to the Statute 
in such case made and Provide. 

Dated at Grayslake, Illinois, Sept. 22, 1994 - 

Kim Cathie Chapin 

0994E-184-AR 

September 30, 1994 

" October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

TO: Olive Sandberg, last assessee; The First National Bank of Lake 
Forest N/K/A Northern Trust Bank of Lake Forest, as Trustee of a Trust 
Agreement dated the 7th" of January, 1946, and known as Trust 
Number 559, record owner; Linda Hess, County Clerk; parties in pos- 
session; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants. 
COUNTY OF LAKE STATE OF ILLINOIS ' 
Date premises sold: December 7, 1992 
Index Number: #06-10-212-007 
Sold for General Taxes for the year of: 1991 

THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 
Property located at: 36751 N. Wildwood Dr., Lake Villa, IL. 
Legal Description- 
Lot 27 in Block 58 in Venetian Village Unit 4, Being a Subdivision of 
Part of the North East Quarter of the North East Quarter of Section 10, 
Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, 
According to the Plat Thereof Recorded 8-19-46, In Book 30 of Plats, 
Pages 74-75, In Lake County, Illinois. 

This notice Is to advise you that the above property has been sold for 
delinquent taxes and that the period of redemption, as extended from 
the sale will expire on February 7, 1994. 

This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been filed for a 
tax deed which will transfer title and the right to possession of this prop- 
erty if redemption is not made on or before February 7, 1994. 

This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of this County In 
Waukegan, Illinois, on February 15, 1995, 1:30 p.m. in Case No. 92 TX 
6. 

You may be present at this hearing, but your right to redeem will 
already have expired at that time. 

. YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO PREVENT 
LOSS OF PROPERTY . 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before February 7, 1995 
by applying to the County Cleric of Lake County, Illinois at the County 
courthouse in Waukegan, Illinois, 

Richard Zagorsk! 
by Richard M. Behr, 
their Attorney 

1094A-210-LV 

Octobers 1994 

October 14, 1994 

• '- ' • ' " October 21, 1994 



OCTobt«7, 1994 Ukd/wcl NcwspA[>£RS COMMUNITY jjljj 



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CHAIN-O-LAKES 

WATERFRONTS 

LOTS 

3 improved lots ori Stanton point 
on Fox Lake. Steel sea-walls, gas, 
electric, & sewer on-site. Nows, the 
time to build your waterfront dream 
house. 

CALL MIKE CULAT AT 

838-MIKE FOR 

DETAILS 



FOX LAKE 



BOAT 
SLIP 



MIKE CULAT, 

GRADUATE'REALTORS INSTITUTE 
ACCREDITED BUYERS REPRESENTJTIVE 

LICENSED IN ILLINOIS & WISCONSIN 
RE/MAX AWARD WINNER 1991, 1992, 1993 

CALL 838-MIKE 
OR PAGER 626-2121 



ti» 



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SUPER STARTER... 

This 1 bedroom beauly has been totally updated. New ji 
furnace, siding, kllchen, well h septic & more. Nice fenced 
yard with water rights lo Chain. . ■ |^ q^ 

CsUMikeCHUtfl838MlKE 




NEW LISTING... INGLESIDE 

5 bedroom 2-story home on 2 acres of hillside property. 
Features new carpeting, windows A vinyl siding. 3 & 1/2 
baths, large living room, kitchen, dining room, tower level 
family room walking out to a large deck. 2 & 1/2 car 
garage, storage shed, '2'L'l. 

mature fruit irees and . m ^^ om i,'249,900 



more 



Colt Mike Calat for prkate sbouiw at 838-MIKE 






WATER RIGHTS TO THE CHAIN 

2 bedroom bungalow with alarge living room, don, 
llreplace. new furnace h new carpeting. Large yard, 2 
Btorage sheds & only '. . _ 

away from the Usted ml '94,900, 

Call Mike Culat at 838MKE 



llreplai 
I storage 
I steps i 
I water. 





ANTIOCH... 

Immaculate 3 bedroom ranch located 2 blocks from spring 
fed lake. Large living room, eat-In kitchen, family room, 
attached 2 & 1/2 car garage. Covered pallo, & a 20x10 
storage shed. Professionally - '.,-.: - - • 

landscaped yard.. Usui 1*131*900 

all Mike Pilot at 838-MIKE 



CHAIN-O-LAKES 

3 bedroom contemporary with 2 lull baths, whirlpool, large 
kitchen, dining room, loft overlooking living room with stone 
fireplace, central-air. Attached garage and large deck 
overlooking the water and 
wMlle area. . N o» Usui 1*184,900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 







CHAIN-O-LAKES WATERFRONTS 

Fantastic 3 bedroom ranch lealures 3 lull baths, 35x16 
living room, 33x14 Florida room overlooking Stanton Bay. 
2 & 12/ car garage with an extra room tor storage or 
workshop. K one of a kind mteiml '^JOO 

Call Mike Pilot at 838-MIKE for appointment 



CHANNEL-FRONT TO PISTAKEE 



This 2 bedroom beauty has been almost completely 
remodeled. Large living roam, dining room, ceramic balh, 
laundry room & more. ttt a nsisi 

Jmtl listed 1 '114,900 



Call Mike Culot for details 





WISCONSIN... 

3 bedroom raised ranch on over an acre. Large living room 
wilh fireplace, large kitchen with oak cabinets, skylights, 
oak trim throughout Lower level family room, attached 
garage, 2 full baths. Located on a quiet cul-de-sac across 
From apond full of nature. ostti 1*149,900 



Call Mike Culat at 768-838-M1KE 



LAKE VILLA...WATER RIGHTS 

This 3 bedroom ranch features a large master bedroom 
with private balh. Largo llving/dlnlng room, laundry room, 
screened porch. 2 & 1/2 car drive-through garage, paved 

dflVB \ jnMstH « $ 139,900 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 




NEW LISTING... SPRING GROVE 

3 bedroom ranch, possible 4th bedroom, 2 lull baths. 2 
fireplaces, large family room, laundry room, attached 
garage, all brick exterior, all 
on aTarge wooded corner y-f| lisUdmt *t 35*900 



LAKE VILLA 

3 bedroom tri-level, wilh 2 full baths, family room, laundry 
room, plus a 20x12 Florida room. 2 4 1/2 car garage, 
paved drive, storage shed. All on a professionally 
landscpaed 1/2 acre of 
property. 



fallMikeCulatet838-MIKE 



SPRING GROVE.... 4 acres 
vacant property high on a hill, 
apple orchard surrounded by 
listed at •79,900. " 



VACANT LAND 

of wooded SPRING GROVE....3 Building sites 

former close to major highway. Each 1 + acre. 

Dines iust Starting at •45,000. Call Mike Culat at 

H ■ 838-MIKE 



justmtei*t*134,900 
toll Mike Pilot at 838-MIKE for private shoving 



ANTIOCH..., 1 .3 acres of beautiful hilltop 
with views of Wilmot Mountain. »55,900. 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE.. 




Caff Mike Culat 

R^fttK 



Advantage Realty 

532 W. Lake St. Antioch, IL 

(708) 395-3000 (ext. 134) 



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Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5 

Sun. 10-3 

'Pictures for illustrations 



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ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 
0trp\jf* ffift fli MftEhSfriflqt wRs COUNTY <|S] 
fcfiliuuli, IL bU00J> 






SUZIE REED 



Staff Reporter 

When Matthew Ekins was late 
getting home one night last June, 
Darb Ekins, like any mother, wor- 
ried about the possibility of him 
being involved in an automobile 
accident. 

"I told myself the police 
would have contacted me," she 
recalled. 

Darb Ekins was unaware that 
Matthew and two others HAD 
been in an accident — a serious 
one in Hound Lake Beach. The 
driver and a passenger in the 
back scat were taken to Condcll 
Medical Center. Matthew, criti- 
cally injured, was airlifted to John 
L Doync Hospital in Milwaukee 



where he died not long after. His 
parents were not contacted for 
almost four hours. 

"One of the other boys* fathers 
was alerted by a passerby and went 
to Condcll right away. He assumed 
we knew," said Barb. "I would have 
assumed the same thing." 

Unfortunately there is no offi- 
cial procedure directing police on a 
course, of action to take in such a 
situation. Granted, they have their 
hands full at the scene of an acci- 
dent, but Ekins feels there should 
be some plan to notify family mem- 
bers as soon as possible. 

"We should have been .there," 
she said. "Had they called us as 
-soon as he was on the helicopter 
we would have made it there." 



Matthew, a 16 : year-old honor 
student at Mundclcln High 
School, died alone while his par- 
ents knew nothing. According to 
Ekins, the other passenger spoke 
of Matthew to the police and later 
to the hospital staff. Matthew's dri- 
ver's license was in his pocket. 
Evidently everyone thought some- 
one else had notified his parents. 

"It's a concern everyone 
should have," said Ekins. "For 
weeks we walked around with the 
thought that he died alone." 

Police currently, have no spe- 
cific instructions on notifying fam- 
ily members after an accident, and 
officers arc doing what they are 
trained to do. Ekins is trying to 
change that with the help of Rep. 



Al Salvi (52nd District). 

"Every [police] department 
should have a written procedure," 
said Salvi, who is researching the 
issue with the help of a book enti- 
tled "In Person, In Time." 

"There's not a lot of uniformity 
in the way different police depart- 
ments notify families," he said. "I 
wish every department in Lake 
County had a written procedure. . 

"In her case she would have 
been able to say good-bye to her 
son. She's turning It into a posi- 
tive by working with me to see 
that departments ail adopt a writ- 
ten procedure so families in the 
future won't have to go through 
what they have been through." 

Salvi said the issue was broad- 



er than he 
expected and 
requires a lot of 
research. He 
doesn't want to 
make the job of 
police officers 
more difficult In 
such a situation. 
He has written 
letters to the 
Lake County 




Matthew Ekins 



Sheriffs Department and every 
police department in his district 
asking them to work on a. proce- 
dure and to talk to their officers in 
an effort to avoid that situation. 

"They should all think about 
this issue ' before it happens 
again," said Salvi. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 






Metra gets start-up 

funds 

RA.GE B2 




Entitlements defy logic 
PAGEB4 ; 




Rhett syndrome child 

'mainstreams' 

RA.GEB9 




'Will Roger's 
Follies' 

Cprii;pone,mixin: 
Candlelight saga 
RAGEB18 

Bridal 

^u^ju|eiidin 
wedding planning 
RAGEB19 



Kids Korner gives kids haven at courthouse 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff. Reporter 

Crayon in hand, Joshua Mor- 
ton was doing what comes natu- 
rally to a 6-year-old. 

He was coloring, just one of 
many activities at Kids Korner, 
the Lake County Courthouse 
Children's Waiting room. 

"1 like the games and the 
toys," Morton said. 

Minutes earlier, grownups 
grabbed a pair of scissors and 
officially cut the ribbon for the 
facility, which opens this week. 
The room behind the first 
courtroom at the Lake County 
Building in Waukegan offers a 
place for toddlers through age 
12 to go while parents are con- 
ducting court business. 

"It took a lot of sincere and 
dedicated people. This is nothing 
short of miraculous," Mary 
Hamming, coordinator of volun- 
teers, said. 

Lake County Circuit Court 



Judge Jane Waller chaired the 
advisory board committee which 
helped plan the room. 

"Children arc frequently 
brought to the courthouse for 
one of two purposes - either to 
be called as a witness in court 
cases, or to accompany their 
parents who themselves have 
business before the court or In 
the courthouse. Whether In the . 
hallways where they arc often 
left unattended and frequently 
seen playing near the railings 
which overlook the floor below, 
or in the courtroom where their 
presence creates a distraction 
to the business at hand, their 
safety and well being arc at risk. 

"They may be adversely im- 
pacted by court proceedings af- 
fecting their own family. They 
may be exposed to inappropri- 
ate behavior by other adults at- 
tending court for criminal, traf- 
fic 
Sec KIDS page B2 




A Barney helper and his new pal, Lake County Judge Jane Waller, 
were on hand to unveil 'Kids Korner'. The room behind a court- 
room at Lake County Building offers youngsters a place to go 
while court Is In session. 



County Clerk candidates argue over qualifications 

' _. .. . .... ... .... •'*.*'■'-• . ;_i • j.1 a. _1 I l»—*»._ 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 






■■y ■■■' 



the two County Clerk candidates. not being qualified for the posi- maintains that she has a history 
Staff Reporter Democratic candidate Kathy tion and lacking a stable work of community service. She was 

Job qualifications could very Ryg accuses her Republican experience for the last 15 years. also executive director of the . 
well be the main issue between counterpart Willard Helander of Helander, on the other hand, Transportation Management 

Association and holds a law 

degree. 

"I feel strongly the voters 
aren't totally aware of the differ- 
ences in our backgrounds," said 
Ryg, who has been elected 
Vernon HUMs Village Clerk for two 
terms. 

Ryg is also District HI Director 
of the Municipal Clerks of Illinois, 
Treasurer of the Municipal Clerks 
of Lake County and a member of 
the International Institute of 
Municipal Clerks. She is also 
director of the Vernon Hills Lions 
Club and affiliated with the South 
Lake- County Regional Action 
Planning Project, College of Lake 
County Southeast Advisory Board 
and other community organiza- 
tions. 

In addition, Ryg has held 
administrative positions . with 
Northwest Mental Health Center 
in Arlington Heights, Condell 
Medical Center in Libcrtyvillc 
and Clearbrook Center in Rolling 
Meadows. 

For the last two years, 
Helander has been executive 
See CLERK page B2 




GOP presence 

Libertyvllle Township Officials (top row) Lyle Sage, Ralph Swank, Wayne Kick, Carol Kick, (bot- 
tom row) Faith Sage, Betsy Swank, Bob Thlckpenny, and Gladys Thlckpenny gather at the Lake 
County Township Officials Banquet at the Ivanhoe Club. — Photo by Todd F. Helsler 



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COUNTY UkflANd, NEWspAp€»,OeTpbKM: 7, 1 994 




to Republican club 



Robert "Bob" Michel, the 
minority leader of the House In 
Washington, D.C. will be in Lake 
County to address the members 
of the 8th Congressional Dist. 
Republican Men & Women's 
Club. Congressman Phil Crane of 
Wauconda made arrangements 
for the minority leader to attend 
the event. The 8th Congressional 
Dist. encompasses parts of Cook 
and Lake Counties; the 
Republican Club has members 
from both counties. 

The dinner meeting will be 
held at the Concorde Banqucst 
Facility, 20922 N. Rand Rd. (Rte. 
12, just north of Qucntin Rd.), 
Kildcer, on Friday, Oct. 14, with 
cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 
p.m. Cost is $17.50 per person. 

Bob Michel served in the 
enlisted ranks during World War 
II as a combat infantryman. He 
was awarded the Bronze Star, 



Purple Heart and four battle 
stars. He was elected the 
Republican Leader of the House 
from 97th to 103rd Congresses, 
elected minority whip December 
1974, and is retiring at the end of 
this session of Congress. 
Congressman Michel Is well 
respected on both sides of the 
aisle In Washington. He is also a 
favorite of many newsmen, who 
refer to Michcls* as the 
"Congressman who brought 
civility to the House sorely 
missed by all." 

Both Congressmen Michel and 
Crane will answer questions at the 
end of the dinner meeting. For 
reservations or more information, 
call Vcnlta McConnel, 526-7851. 
The 8th Congressional Dist. 
Republican Club welcomes mem- 
bers and guests to this dinner meet- 
ing. Memberships will be available 
to those who wish to join. 




Happy 25th 

College of Lake County students and officials gather around a huge birthday cake for the cel- 
ebration of the college's 25th anniversary. Free cake and Ice cream was served and hot dogs 
were only 25 cents.— Photo by Todd F. Helsler 



Metro gets incremental 

funding for Startup COSt CLC board authorizes construction changes 



Mctra commuter rail officials' 
expressed appreciation for the 
efforts of the Illinois congressional 
delegation for the passage of the 
FY95 Transporation 

Appropriations bill that includes 
$2.5 million in assured incremental 
funding toward the start-up of 
commuter service on the tracks of 
the Wisconsin Central Railroad. 
The service, slated to begin in early 
1996, will extend from Antioch to 
Chicago serving 11 Lake and Cook 
County communities as well as 
providing access to O'Hare 
International Airport from the 
northern suburbs. 

"Congressman John Porter 
worked diligently with 
Congressman Dan Rostcnkowski, 
Transportation Subcommittee 
Chairman Bob Carr (D-Mich.), 
and downstatc Illinois committee 
member Richard Durbin to 
secure funding for the Wisconsin 
Central project," noted Metra 
Chairman Jeffrey R. Ladd. "The 



The College of Lake County hoard of trustees 
authorized Lcgat Architects to make project modi- 
fications in the building construction proposal for 
the multiusc instructional facility and the instruc- 
tional performing arts building at the Grayslakc 
campus. 

.The action was taken because the bids previous- 
ly received in July were over budget and, conse- 
quently, the board directed that the project be re- 
designed and re-bid. Although some bids that were 
received for different phases of the project were 
below the project estimate, bids for overall con- 
struction cost were approximately $5 million over 



new service is eagerly awaited by 
folks in the north suburbs," Ladd 
said, "and their interests were 
well served." 

Chairman Ladd noted that 
members of the Illinois delega- 
tion played a major role in "keep- 
ing the doors open" in 
Washington. "Congressman 
Porter, with the help of 
Congressmen Henry Hyde, 
Rostcnkowski and Richard 
Burbin, have been committed to 
this project from the beginning 
and wc arc very grateful to all of 
them," he said. 

Of. the $96 million needed to 
begin service on what will be the From page Bl 
first new commuter rail service or divorce matters, or they may 
route in northeast Illinois since be subject to unnecessary stress 
1928, less than $55 million will be while they wait their own turn to 
federal funding. More than half of testify," Judge Waller said, 
the needed federal funding has The effort began in 1993 when 

already been allocated. The Chief Judge John Goshgarian 
remaining funds will come from appointed a steering committee 
on-line communities and state and a 18-membcr advisory board 
sources. was established. 



the project budget, said Arthur E. Kent, vice-presi- 
dent for administrative affairs. Design changes and 
other reductions will result in an estimated $3 mil- 
lion in project savings, he said. For example, Kent 
said, the college revised die design of the entrance 
way to the facilities at a savings of approximately 
$650,000. The board also authorized an additional 
sum of approximately $2 million for the project 

Bids for the project will be opened in late January or 
cariy February. The construction is expected to begin 
in cariy spring. The estimated construction cost is 
approximately $20 million, of which the State of 
Illinois wilt contribute $13 million. 



Kids 



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Several companies and or- 
ganizations played a part Several 
members of these groups were 
awarded certificates, of appre- 
ciation at a ceremony which in- 
clude a Barney helper '. Among 
those awarded were: Hamming; 
Pat Goodman, Child Care Coalition 
of Lake County; Dan Rcidcl of 
American Tradesman; Mark 
Telinski, mural ist of Antioch; Clark 
Interiors; Lake County Office 
Equipment and Studio North, 
which designed die logo. 

The room is open when court 
is in session. Hamming explained 
a wristband system is being used 
to make sure the children leave 
with the right parents. 



"I could not think of another 
project more worthwhile," Pat 
Salvisaid. 

The Lake County Bar 
Association is seeking project 
funds. 

The bar association donated 
$5,000 as did the Fighting Back 
Task Force. 

Volunteers arc particularly 
needed in afternoon hours, 
Hemming said. To volunteer; call 
546-7144. 

Rcidcl said American 
Tradesman, his Gurnec firm, co- 
ordinated remodeling through 
Lake County Home Builders. 
Clark Interiors donated the car- 
peting. 



Clerk 



Fighting MS 

Among the volunteers biking and hiking for Dartene for the Multiple Sclerosis Society at Half Day 
Forest Preserve In Lincolnshire were from left, Dave Heart of Wheeling; Kathy Johnson, Olympic 
gymnast who competed In the 1984 summer games; Kelly Connolly of Buffalo Grove; Dawn 
Denman and Chairman Randy Denman of Grayslake and Krtsten Bacsa of Grayslake.— Photo 



by Krlsten Johnson 



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From page Bl managing '43 employees and a $2 

director of the Transportation million budget, and that there is 

Management Association, and no time for on-the-job training, 
has been involved with the "This position is too impor- 

Northwest Municipal tant to not have experience," Ryg 

Conference. Her community scr- said. "She has a 2-year working 



vice affiliations . include 
MainStrcct Libcrtyvillc, Youth 
and Family .'counseling, 
Libcrtyvillc Junior Woman's Club 
and a member -of the 
Northeastern Illinois YWCA as 
well as. various other Libcrtyville 
organizations. 



history and now she wants to 
become responsible for a huge 
county department." 

Helandcr said it was insulting 
to attack the community organi- 
zations she has worked for. 

"They are " organizations 
where professionals give their 



"I offer a business background, time and expertise," Helandcr 

the technical training and a real said. "I think It is very sad to 

strong commitment to community attack that. " 
service," Helandcr said Ryg said she was not attacking 

Ryg contends that while Helander's volunteer work, but 

Hclander's community service is her lack of working experience, 
admirable, she has not been in "Once the election is over, I 

the work force for a great major!- can start right away," Ryg said. "I 

ty of the las'US ypWu Rvfl *»M the already have the experience. It's a 
County ,CI^[ ^fppc liivfdlvbs ' job I know." 






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6cTobtft ^Jl994 "LAkeUNci Newspapers 




At A GIance 




LaI<e 
CouNiy 



No strike date set 

ROUND LAKE— Contract talks continue between 
Round Lake teachers, secretaries and teaching assis- 
tants and the Round Lake Unit School Board. The two 
sides accuse each other of not negotiating in good 
faith. Terri Zumbrook, president of Education 
Association of Round Lake, said the school board has- 
n't compromised on language issues which the teach- 
ers feel arc most important Board President James 
Unit said the language issue is really an "excuse to 
strike." He said the number of language issues arc 
almost impossible to mediate. The union voted to 
strike but has not set a date. 

Allendale vote falls short 

IAKE VILLA— The Village Board voted 4-2, one 
vote shy of what was needed to approve the annexa- 
tion of a 40-acrc parcel west of the village. Allendale 
was seeking Agricultural /Institutional zoning for the 
site. The school is planning an expansion of parking 
and school facilities. Lake Villa Trustee Bill Effingcr, 
said he didn't want to see the police department hav- 
ing to answer more calls if the facility was expanded. 
The board agreed to reconsider the issue at the next . 
board meeting, ' 



Antioch makes drug bust 

ANTIOCH — As a result of some excellent police 
work by Antioch Police Officer Craig Somerville, 
Richard J. M alone, of Mallard Street in Antioch was 



arrested Oct. 1. Responding to a domestic battery call, 
police found one pound of marijuana, approximately 
$10,000 in cash, 80 tablets of Valium, and a telephone 
pager. Bond was set at $200,000. 

Woodland approves budget 

GAGES LAKE— Wood] and District 50 Board of 
Educatjon approved a budget totaling more than $20 
million at a special meeting last week. The expected 
total for expenditures is $20,580,287, up $799,093 from 
the tentative budget. 

Officials raise Guneo concerns 

LIBERTYVILLE— Liber tyvillc Mayor Jo Ann 
Eckmann and LibcrtyviUc County Board member Carol 
Calabrcsa raised some concerns about the proposed 
2, 100- unit housing development planned for the 
Cuneo property due south of the village. Eckmann said 
the single, winding street proposed from Butte rficld 
Road to Milwaukee Avenue may not be enough to alle- 
viate east-west traffic congestion, She suggested a four- 
lane street. Calabrcsa urged the Village of Vernon Hills 
to require higher Impact fees from the developer to 
help financially troubled Hawthorn School District 73. 

Holiday light show proposed 

VERNON HELLS— Vernon Hills officials proposed 
a new special event open to the public highlighting 
Christmas lights. The holiday show of lights would fea- 
ture Christmas characters and scenes that would show- 
case lights. The drive-thru park would be offered on 
the scenic Cuneo Museum and Gardens. The event 
would be offered seven days a week from the day after 
Thanksgiving to Ian. 15. Officials are still working out 
traffic and cost details. 

Ullages receive more funds 

IAKE COUNTY— As a result of the availability of 

additional funds, villages along the proposed new 
Metra line on the Wisconsin-Central tracks will receive 
more money from Operation Green Light. The money , 
is specifically targeted for parking facilities at the soon- 
to-be-built stations. 

Commuter parking expands 

GRAYSLAKE— Commuters looking for a parking 
spots next to a train station — a scarcity in Lake 
County — will be pleased about Metra's plans for the 



Grayslakc station. Metra has just extended it blessings 
for commuters to use the unimproved lot to the south 
of its existing parking. The lot will not be maintained 
and people will be parking at their own risk, but it docs 
open up ample parking to commuters. The south lot is 
part of the ongoing expansion effort at the Grayslakc 
station and is scheduled to be paved next yean When 
complete, the lot will have 225 parking spaces. That 
will increase total parking at Grayslakc station to over 
500 spaces. 

Police burn marijuana fields 

IAKE COUNTY— More than $3.5 million of mari- 
juana was confiscated and burned by the' Lake County 
Metropolitan Enforcement Group, taking around 2,370 
pounds of the drug out of the system. They burned 380 
plants of high quality marijuana in a field in Wauconda 
Township near the intersection of Route 12 and Case 
Road Sept. 30, and set 410 other plants aflame in a 
remote Fremont Township off Gilmer Road and north 
6fRoutcl76onOct.3. 

Huge water tank okayed 

LAKE ZURICH— Village officials arc planning for 
future water needs and have authorized the prelimi- 
nary engineering and design of a 1.5-millio- gallon 
water storage tank to be erected near Lake Zurich High 
School off Midi othain Road. The tank should be com- 
pleted and ready for use in the spring of 1996, and will 
cost around $1.3 million to build. It will give the village 
2.25 million gallons of water storage capacity. A 
500,000-gallon tank was originally planned. That plan 
was altered when the village learned it would cost 
almost $300,000 to have one of its two 500,000-gallon 
tanks repainted. The village opened a 750,000-gallon 
tank more than one year ago. 

Golf course parking adequate 

MUNDELQN— Countryside residents and village 
board members questioned the need for more parking 
space at Steeplechase Golf Club. The Mundclein Park 
District has purchased two lots for the purpose of adding 
spaces for overflow parking. After Parks and Recreation 
Director Alex Marx told the board the space was used 
only two times last summer, Village Administrator Ken 
Marabella suggested an alternate plan to designate a 
nearby street for additional parking. The park board will 
consider die plan at its next meeting. 



A Safe Place marks domestic violence awareness month 



A Safe Place/Lake County 
Crisis Center, the Lake County 
shelter and counseling program 
for victims of domestic violence, 
will hold its second annual 
Candle Lighting Ceremony at 5 
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, on the east 
steps of the Lake County Court 
House, 18 N. County St., 
Waukegan. 

The ceremony was organized 
to increase . awareness during 
October, Domestic Violence 
Awareness Month, of a crime that 
invades homes, ruins lives and 
kills women and children 

The lit candles will symbolize 
the renewed commitment by A 
Safe Place to help victims become 
survivors and work toward an 



end to violence. 

Research shows that half of all 
women experience some form of 
violence from their partners dur- 
ing marriage; more than one- 
third of these women are bat- 
tered repeatedly every yean and 
70 percent of men who abuse 
their female partners also abuse 
their children. 

T-shirt art hanging outside the 
court house during the candle 
lighting portrays the pain, fear 
and hopes of these victims. 

The shirts were created by 
abused women and their children 
who are clients of A Safe Place. 

Speakers at the ceremony will 
be Lake County State's. Atty. 
Michael Waller, Circuit Court 



Associate Judge Victoria A. Rossetti 
of Domestic Violence Court, A Safe 
Place Executive Director Phyllis 
DeMott and survivors of abuse 



who found safety, counseling and friends and supporters to rcmem- 

courage to start their lives anew at bcr and recognize victims of 

A Safe Place. The public is urged to domestic violence. For informa- 

light a candle with A Safe Place tion call A Safe Place at 249-5147. 



CLC hosting annual child care conference 



The College of Lake County 
and the Far North Chapter of the 
Chicago Assn. for the Education 
of Young Children will sponsor 
the annual fall child care confer- 
ence from 8 am. to 4 p.m. Oct 15 
at the CLC auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington St, Grayslakc. 

The conference, with the 
theme, "Making Our World Safe 
for Children: Care for Children," 
will begin with registration and a 



continental breakfast at 8 a.m., 
followed by a variety of work- 
shops till 3:35 p.m., and conclude 
at 4 p.m.. 

The program is open to any- 
one who works with children, 
especially teachers, child care 
center personnel, Head Start 
workers and parents. Workshops 
will focus on the care of children 
from birth to age 12. 

Sessions will cover such topics 



as early childhood assessment, 
Chinese family traditions, work- 
ing with Hispanic families, child 
sexual abuse, infant-toddler tem- 
peraments, staff training and 
evaluation, intergenerational 
care and fitness for children. 

The cost is $15, which includes 
lunch. The registration deadline 
is Oct. 7. For information and reg- 
istration, call 223-6601, cxt 2742 
or 2345. 



Pets of tIie WeeIc 

We'd like new homes 

These two beauties arc sisters. They came 
to us last fall with tiny families. Someone had' 
taped all of them in two cartons and tossed 
them from a car. This terrible start took its 
toll on the youngsters. The two moms are 





now beautiful, healthy and will be wonder- 
ful additions to new homes— better yet, 
now about an almost matched set who 
know each other very well! For an adoption 
appointment, call The Asslsl Animal 
' Foundation at (815)455-9411. 



Keatoti needs new 
Mend and home 

Keaton is an unusually handsome, 
male, medium size shepherd/husky 
mix. Keaton has a short, soft, shaggy 
black coat with attractive brown and 
silver highlights, perk cars and a bushy 
tail 

Intelligent and friendly, Keaton is 
just 2-ycars-old. 

This dog truly loves people and he 
responds with playful enthusiasm to 
attention and affection. 

Keaton would make a great com- 
panion dog if you have a dog at home 
who would love to have a buddy, as 
Keaton loves other dogs. 

This special dog has been waiting 
patiently for a loving home since 







■ i 

V 

E 







Keaton 



November, 1993 in Cage 4. 

Keaton can be adopted for a cash 
donation of $55 with spay/ neuter, col- 
lar, leash, First shots, follow-up care 
and more included. 

Orphans of the Storm is located at 
2200 Riverwoods Rd. in Deerficld. 

Hours arc 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven 
days a week. Call 945-0235 for further 
information. 





EpfTpRIAL t Uk6JA^d NewspApes Oc T obt*,7,, ^9-94. 



- Vi EWpoi NT — — — — - 

Entitlements defy logic, public good 



Bill Schfoodor 

Publisher 

America's love affair with enti- 
tlements underscores misguided 
notions in public debate now 
being waged on opposite sides of 
Lake County. 

On the cast side, Washington 
bureaucrats have thrown a 
wrench into two years of meticu- 
lous planning by neighboring 
communities to provide for a 
workable disposition of Ft. 
Sheridan land made available 
through a Pentagon decision to 
close the military installation. . 

On the west side, the board of 
education at Round Lake Unit 
School is locked in a dispute with 



teachers whether or not a "step," 
or seniority increase, is a pay raise. 
Ft. Sheridan neighbors and 
Forest Preserve officials were left 
numb when advocates for the 
homeless said shelters would have 
to be provided In any plan for use 
of lands not already earmarked for 
federal purposes. ■ That meant that 
local planning is up for grabs and 
the federal government still Is a 
player in the future of Ft. Sheridan. 
Congressman John Porter, who 
put together a special commis- 
sion designed to plan for the 
highest and best use of Ft. 
Sheridan land, was stunned but 
not surprised. "We knew that the 
claim for homeless shelters could 



be Invoked under the McKinncy 
Act. The fact Is that the land and 
the area aren't suitable for serv- 
ing the homeless." 

Wait until the reality of housing 
the homeless in Army barracks 
and other military-style buildings 
sinks in, especially on liberal con- 
stitutlcnts. Visions of the Califor- 
nia relocation camps for Japanese- 
Americans at the start of World 
War II will be revisited all over. 

In the school salary controversy, 
union teachers say the board con- 
tention is all wrong that a modest 
pay hike coupled with a step 
increase amounting to nearly 
$1,000 Is fair and adequate. Not so, 
according to the union, because 



the step is a built-in entitlement 
. and protected by state law. 

In the case of the school salary 
squabble, more isn't more. It's 
less in the eyes of the 400 mem- 
ber union. As for the old Army 
post, the homeless arc to be pro- 
vided shelter at Ft. Sheridan 
regardless of the fact that they 
would be in a strange environ- 
ment with family, friends and job 
opportunities miles away. 

Logic is being defied at both 
Round Lake and Ft. Sheridan 
because of entitlements. Com- 
plicating decision making and 
conflict resolution is the fact that 
the knee jerk entitlement mental- 
ity has acquired the force of law 




in the legal process. 

How in the world can sensibili- 
ty be restored when public policy 
first must be overhauled? 

Ft. Sheridan and Round Lake 
Unit School arc prime examples 
where entitlements arc running 
against common sense and good 
public policy. 

Bill Schroeder offers editorial 
commentary every Tuesday on 
Lake County Live presented by 
STAR Channel 3/U.S. Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



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For now, future: 
Judy and Loleta 

Two ascending stars in the Illinois political landscape ; 
are adding. luster to the Republican state ticket for the 
Nov: 8 general election. V 

Historically, the offices of state treasurer and comp- 
troller are lumped together as "lesser" or low visability . 
offices. But, it's also a political fact Of life that treasurer 
and comptroller have become launching pads for bigger 
roles in public office. 

That's why the candidacies of State Sen. Judy Baar 
Topinka, the effervescent Republican Candidate for state 
treasurer, and Loleta Didrickson, the articulate GOP 
nominee for comptroller, take on added significance. 
With no stretch of the imagination, Topinka and 
Didrickson are leaders in a generation of public officials 
that will carry Illinois into the next century. 

Both Topinka and Didrickson are well grounded in the 
ins and outs of state government. They know what's 
wrong and what's right about state government. 
Knowing where the hot buttons are is vital for a state 
official. Didrickson was a four-term state representative 
before being named director of the Illinois Dept. of 
Employment Security. Topinka offers 14 years of legisla- 
tive experience, including service as a state representa- 
tive. She is the current chairman of the Senate Health 
Committee and is a member of the Judiciary 
Committee. 

Topinka, often brash but never dull, has a knack of 
cutting through the mountains of balderdash that 
incumber honest reform and governmental inertia. 
That's a good quality to possess in an office where iriflu-'. 
erice can be used to, advance minority/female business 
investments, promote meaningful economic develop- >|; 
ment and bring about speedier transfer of mnds for a 
chronically cash-starved state. 

Running for a job with watchdog responsibility, 
Didrickson has demonstrated the instincts required of 
-the comptroller to .hold state government more 
accountable for expenditures as well as speak out as a 
;^ leader, particularly where she has expertise like women's 

'.'IsSiies.: , $■:■; '' '?£?$ . ■ ■./". % 

Republicans would be hard pressed to find morecapa- 
ble and attractive candidates for the bread and butter 
offices of state treasurer -'and comptroller. In our opin- 
ion, they are infinitely more qual ified than their 
Democratic opponents, State SerirEarlean Collins, 

^comptroller nominee, and Nancy Drew Sheehan, state 

^treasurer aspirant,^ 

•f hand-picked .-by. pa^ slate makers and are products of 

■die Chicago school of machine politics. 

Topinka and Didrickson have our enthusiastic 
endorsement for election. *" 



i-Letters WeIcome 



Letters to the editor are welcome. They should be 
on topics of general Interest approximately 250 
words or less. All letters must be signed, and con- 
tain a home address and telephone number. The 
< editor reserves 1 the right to condense all letters.' ' ' u 



L LI I I \J IV 1 1\ L Newspapers 



Letters to tIhe EcHtor 



District mismanaged 

Editor 

Grayslakc School Dist. 46 has a $13.3 million refer- 
endum on the November ballot and I, personally will 
vote no for this referendum. 1 feel the school board 
and school officials arc mismanaging our tax dollars. 

They arc choosing to risk school children's safety 
by not providing busing within a mile and a half of 
school. They expect children as young as five years 
old to walk up to 40 minutes to and from school. 
This walk consists of roads without sidewalks, rail- 
road tracks, busy thoroughfares and state highways 
(111. Rte. 120). 

According to school officials, they do not have 
the funds to bus students within the mile and a half, 
however, they can afford to send out a newsletter to 
all residents which is printed in two colors. Printing 
in two colors is considerably more expensive than 
printing in one color. This is a telling example of 
how our tax dollars are spent. How many other 
examples are there of which I am not aware. 
Supposedly the school officials arc cutting their 
spending in "every way possible." 

(Catherine Kcefe Baumgartner 
^ Grayslake 

Demo chief deceitful 

Editor 

Like Bill Clinton, the local Democrat chairman 
sometimes has trouble separating fact from fiction 
in his public statements. His claim that anyone 
other than Willard H dander was the Republicans' 
choice for county clerk is more than dishonest, it's 
downright deceitful. 

Willard Helandcr, was and is our choice for Lake 
County clerk, Although others were considered, no 
potential candidate had the credentials or the pro- 



fessional management abilities of Willard Helandcr. 
An attorney and former judicial clerk, Willard has 
provided her outstanding organizational skills and 
technical expertise to improve her community. The 
MainStrcct downtown rcvitalization program and 
the new Civic Center in her hometown of 
Libcrtyvillc arc just two of the many projects which 
have been strengthened by her selfless dedication 
.and effort throughout the decade and a half her 
family has lived in Lake County. 

As its fust executive director, Willard built 
Transportation Management Assn. of Lake County 
from scratch into one of the finest agencies of its 
kind, in just two short years. 

State Rep. Robert W. Churchill 

Former Chairman, Lake Co. 

Republican Central Committee 

Lake Villa 

Single payer answer 

Editor 

We need a single payer health care plan that 
includes universal and comprehensive coverage. 

Why? This is the only plan that offers high quali- 
ty effective medical treatment regardless of one's 
health history or economic status. . 

The disabled are often in the left, out group. 
Statistics show that 92 percent of the disabled are 
unemployed. And the group has grown during the 
past 10 years at the rate of 83 percent. 

The seriously ill and those with poor medical his- 
tories are often in this group. Insurance companies 
often reject them or offer coverage at prohibitive 
rates. 

Agnes Rauseen 

Evanston 

See LETTERS page B5 



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Oclobe* 7,1 9i 4 LAkElAwrf Ue^pa^ J 6inMvt: 




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Future of Rte. 53 plan worth 




■ 



Party lines, the Lake land Newspapers 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. , 

Now that the Rte. 53 extension is a 
Toll way project, State Rep.' Bob 
Churchill (R-Lakc Villa) doesn't flinch 
any more when talking about the pro- 
posed timetable for the multl-lancd road- 
way that will give Lake County motorists a 
new north-south access to Chicago and 
■ close-in suburbs. 

"Five to seven years for the first leg," 
Churchill replied quickly in answer to a 
question about starting Rte. 53 raised at a 
meeting of the Grant Twp. Republican Club. 

The first leg will go through Grays lake 
and connect with 1-94. Churchill speculat- 
ed that the westward extension linking Fox 
Lakc-McHcruy-Lake Geneva will be more 
like "10 to 15 years away." 

There was a time when Churchill spoke 
of "protecting the centcrline for possible 
building in 25 years" when questioned 
about the status of extending Rte. 53 north 
of Lake Cook Rd. 

Route 53 always has been more popular 
in Churchill's norm Lake County district than 
in Long Grove, Hawthorn Woods and 
Mundclcin where construction will gobble . 
up thousands of acres of open lands and 

destroy an estimated 2,800 acres of wetlands, 

-■"mTm.m 

Oops, Andy-— For comic relief, the 
campaign staff of Congressman John 

Porter likes Demo- 
cratic opponent 
Andy Krupp of 
Arlington Heights. 
Krupp has been 
carping about 

Porter's "operation" 
of a side business, 
General Services 
Corp. When he 
stopped laughing, 
Porter explained 





Krupp 



GSC.ls a shell, an inoperative corporation 
organized some years ago for a family 
member. Thcvctcran congressman is list- 
ed as agent by the Sec. of State and holds a 
token office. Sorry, Andy. 

. Candidate tour— Republican candi- 
date for state comptroller loleta 
Dfdrlckson made the rounds of Lake 

County in a mara- 
thon session Mon- , 
day. She included a 
visit with Mundclcin 
High School stu- 
dents and Liberty- 
villc businesses on 
her agenda and even 
greeted early morn- 
ing commuters at 
the Libertyvillc train 
Dldrlckson station. Working 

hard in Republican territory included a 
visit to Abbott Labs. Party Lines has not 
been advised of any upcoming visits by 
Earlean Collins, the Democratic candi- 
date for the state financial post. 

Partying Pam— Maybe she doesn't 
realize it, but County Board Rep. Pam 

Newton (R-Vcmon Hills) will be compet- 
ing with the Seinfeld cult when she tosses 
her Party With Pam fundraiser Thursday, 
Oct. 13, at Sluggers Bar and Grill. 

Newton has festivities scheduled from 
5:30 to ft p.m. and is offering batting cages, 
sand volleyball, basketball and highball as 
inducements. Maybe she can have the TV 
sets tunc in Seinfeld at o'clock and keep 
the crowd longer? By the way, what's high- 
ball? Used to be something in a glass with 
ice cubes. 

• • • 

Daunting past— During a Lake 
County swing the other day, Lt. Gov. Bob 
Kustra admitted that voters seem more 
interested in his brief flirtation, (his words) 



with talk radio than issues. Kustra sighed 
that it's tough breaking through the 
Democratic stonewall and liberal media 
bias to describe all the good things hap- 
pening to improve Illinois education 
under his boss. 

Kustra wasn't shy talking about how 
he'll be concentrating on his political 
career the next four years and a possible 
shot at the governorship in 1998. "You can 
bet there won't be any job offers from 

WLS," Kustra joked. 

• • • 

On the move— Rich f ablonskl is not 

only running for sheriff. He's racing for the 
job. Really. A jogging enthusiast, Jablonski 
says he's been entering as many benefit 
runs as possible. "It's fun and it's good 
exposure. I always wear my 'Jablonski for 
Sheriff shirt," exclaimed the Democratic 
nominee. 

The personable ex* police chief in 
Lindcnhurst and Round Lake Beach is 
focusing on what he considers' the 
"deplorably low" rate of major crimes 
solved by Republican Sheriff Clint 
Grlnnell. "I think the sheriff has lost his 

fire," Jablonski jibed. 

• • • - 

. Second 50th b irthday bash— It'll 
be a musical GOPT 
hoc-down as promi- 
nent Republicans 
join County Board 
Rep. Larry Leaf- 
blad to celebrate 
his 50th birthday I 
twice at a fund rais- 
er, Oct. 16. Among] 
the well-known I 
singers slated to ' 
participate in the Leafblad 
karaoke sing-a-long arc: Congressman 
Phil Crane, Coroner Barbara 
Richardson, Sen. Adeline Geo-Karls 
and Sally O (Coffelt). Coffclt has 




BBBBBBV ^^^^| 










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WW? 




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about 



promised a duct 
with Leafblad. "This 
is not your typical 
political event with 
the typical political 
BS," Leafblad 

quipped. Sounds 
like a fun-filled 
evening at Ren- 
wood. 

• • • 

Richardson Tommy 

watchers — Because they have two homes 
and a .business in Wisconsin, Lake 
County's husband and wife Republican 
team of Joe and Nancy Masterson are 
confining politicking these days to the 
future of Badger state Gov. Tommy 
Thompson. The Mastersons have sent 
back word that Illinois could make good 
use of Thompson's theories about "work- 
fare" for welfare recipients and a taxation 
system that promotes business and jobs 
expansion. 

••• \ 
Referendum, referendum, refer- 
endum—Taxpayers living in southwest 
Libertyvillc and northern Vernon Hills 
could be confronted with three referen- 
dum proposals over the next year. A two- 
part referendum for Hawthorn School 
District 73 is already a given this 
November. Those same residents could be 
faced with a Libertyvillc High School refer- 
endum to fund an addition to the Butler 
Lake complex or build a south campus in 
Vernon Hills. And again, those same tax- 
payers could be confronted with yet 
another referendum. The third potential 
referendum would be for the Cook 
Memorial Library District. This referen- 
dum would fund cither expanding the 
existing facility or building a Vernon Hills 
branch. Party Lines sympathizes with 
those residents and taxing bodies who 
may have some tough choices ahead. 






\ — 



letters 



\ 






From page B4 

Bringing facts forward 

Editor 

This letter is in regard to articles in area 
papers covering the meeting of the Village 
of Island Lake when the Clearwater Oaks 
Subdivision plan was approved. 

There was lots of misinformation in all 
of them. The only misinformation 1 
noticed being corrected was the amount 
of acreage involved. More corrections 
should have been made. In reading vari- 
ous articles, I got the impression that Mrs. 
Carolyn Widtmann was not only on a one- 
woman crusade but didn't know what she 
was talking about. 

The plan calls for town houses to be 
built in an area that is flood prone and 
overcrowded. Part of the property is an 
ADID wetland. Flooding is a major con- 
cern and a problem that many residents 
around Slocum Lake have been trying to 
deal with for years. The schools already 
have more kids than they can handle. 
Concerns over how more development 
will impact the land and affect the resi- 
dents arc valid. Neither the concerns nor 
the residents should be ignored. Or belit- 
tled. 

When the Clearwater Oaks Subdivision 
was proposed, Mylith Park residents start- 
ed asking questions. In order to get the 
answers they started talking to people 
(Army Corps of Engineers, Storm Water 
Management, Fish and Wildlife, U.S. EPA, 

etc.). 

They started researching at libraries, 
reading information from many, many 
agencies. They attended board meetings, . 
planning meetings, etc They sent :-- faxes-; 
and wrote letters. They had people come 



to association meetings to explain things 
like wet lands, drainage districts, water 
detention and much more. They talked, 
they listened, they learned, they shared. 

Yes, one of these people was Carolyn 
Widtmann. She has put a lot of time and 
effort into finding put the facts. All the 
work she has done has been professional, 
thorough, careful and honest. She did not 
and does not deserve to be ignored or 
thought of as ignorant. 

If the papers had researched the infor- 
mation in the ale half as thoroughly as 
Carolyn and other Mylith Park residents 
did their work, maybe no corrections 
would have had to be made. 

Terese Sinklalr 
IslandLakc 

Sharing headaches 

Editor 

What else do Island Lake and Round 
Lake Heights have in common besides: 

Flooding problems, overcrowded 
schools, increasing tax dollars, high densi- 
ty development, traffic congestion, wet- 
land elimination and flood plain develop- 
ment? 

Answer: A proposed Pasquinelli high 
density development in areas that already 
experience more flooding than is current- 
ly documented. 

In Island Lake, the Army Corps of 
Engineers has determined ADID Wetland 
Site No. 121 on Slocum Lake would bene- 
fit from storm water detention. The devel- 
oper also proposes to fill the flood plain 
and two of the on-site wetlands. Even 
, though the communities around the lake 
I 'flood; preliminary approval was given to 
increase the-hydrological impact on the 



watershed basin in a drainage district too 
antiquated to handle the present flooding 
conditions. 

In Round Lake Heights, the proposed 
development is to take place in an area 
that has been subjected to major flooding. 
No current flood mapping is available on 
the property in question. In 1993, the same 
area received $250,000 in funding for flood 
damages. The proposed is contiguous to 
another high density development and the 
Fairfield Marsh. 

Both proposed projects come with little 
assurance of maintenance and liability for 
wetlands and flood control, as that is left to 
the new property owners and the villages 
that encourage the risky development 

The proposed development sites in 
both communities have one more com- 
mon, but tragic factor— both were once 
designated as forest preserve property. 
Now the communities at large arc forced 
to deal, with the explosion of unmanaged 
high density growth, elimination of our 
natural flood control resources and mag- 
nified flooding hazards. 

The high density development in Lake 
County must stop. Become informed, go 
to your village meetings and remember 
those that encourage risky development at 
election time. 

Carolyn J. Widtmann 
Island Lake 

Churchill mailing comical 

Editor 

As election time approaches, sitting 
politicians mail campaign literature dis- 
guised as something else. A case in point 
was the recent 42,000 copy "Legislative 
Update" distj-ibptcd by Rep. Robert 



Churchill. 

Mr. Churchill lauds his legislative 
exploits of the past year. He suggests his 
activities have included "protecting and 
preserving our natural areas." This is com- 
ical, with his well publicized efforts to pass 
the Rte. 53 Tollway extension which would 
effectively destroy much of the remaining 
wetlands and other vital nature areas. 

A picture of this piece shows Mr. 
Churchill, along with the governor, "shar- 
ing a moment" following the governor's 
budget address. 

The caption refers to a $250 million 
state funding increase for Illinois school 
children. It fails to mention, however, that 
while he was present for the vote, Mr. 
Churchill failed to support this budget, by 
merely voting "present" 

Mr. Churchill sponsored the "Zero ■ 
Tolerance" bill which would revoke the 
driver's license of minors caught driving 
with any detectable level of blood alcohol. 
Mr. Churchill also supported a measure to 
require background checks of school bus 
drivers. Curiously, this measure does not 
appear to call for alcohol testing of school 
bus drivers which Illinois law docs not 
now require. 

Mr. Churchill states we "must all make 
some sacrifices." The residents within his 
62nd district have done just that through 
rcal'estatc taxes escalating at the highest 
rate in the state, gridlocked roadways, and 
schools suffering under the weight of ram- 
pant over-development. 

This is what Dist. 62 residents have sac- 
rificed to attain under the leadership of 
Mr. Churchill. 

i i - 1 ( (i Bradley P., p,iiakas,Sr.j 
. Lindcnhurst: 
















ill 



1 fAiyfftUACE UkelANd f^pARCRS £cjoby 7, 1??4 




Tips to bottling blooms for 
next year's spring garden 



What do carinas, caladlums, 
dahlias, gladiolus, and tuberous bego- 
nias have In common? Besides produc- 
ing gorgeous blooms or foliage all sum : 
men none of them usually survive Lake 
County winters, says the Univ. of Illinois 
Cooperative Extension Service. If you 
want to see these same beauties In 
your garden next year, set aside some 
time this fall to ready them for winter 
storage. 

Caladlums (elephant ears) and 
tuberous begonias require similar 
preparations. After seven or eight 
months of growing, these tubers need a 
well-deserved rest. Dig them up after 
the first frost to rescue the tubers, even 
If you grow them In containers which 
you bring Inside. Remove the foliage, 
shake off any excess dirt, and dry them 
In a warm, well-venttlated place for 
several days. Store caladlums and be- 
gonias In a container filled with dry 
peat moss, vermlcullte, or perllte In an 
airy, dry, frost-free (40 to 50 degrees F) 
room throughout the winter. 

On to cannas, which seems to multi- 
ply readily and give you the oppor- 
tunity to share with your friends. After 
the first frost, cut back the stalks to four 
Inches, and dig up the rhizomes. Keep 
as much sol! as possible around the 
roots, and let them dry for several days. 
Store cannas In a coo), dry, well-venti- 



lated area until you plant them next 
spring. 

Storing dahlias requires some extra 
care since they tend to dry out easily. 
Dahlia tuberous roots connect by a thin 
neck to the central growing point. Dig 
them fwlth care because tuberous 
roots become useless when broken off 
at thaf thin stem. Cut the foliage to four 
Inches, and remove excess dirt. Over- 
winter them In dry peatmoss and a 
cool, dry, well-ventilated room. Walt 
until spring when you can see the grow- 
ing points before dividing dahlias. 

Gladiolus foliage needs four to six 
weeks to cure after blooming, although 
most people wait until after frost to dig 
them up. Lift corms out of the soil, cut 
the foliage to 1 1/2 Inches, and shake 
off the extra soil. Dry them In your 
garage or similar place for two weeks, 
then separate the old corm from the 
young ones. Place gladiolus In onion 
sacks or other breathable containers, 
and place them In a cool, d[y, well-ven- 
tilated room. 

. With any of these tender specialized 
structures, discard diseased, Insect-rid- 
dled, or otherwise suspect bulbs, and 
store the remainder. 

Dust them before storage with a 
fungicide containing Thlram according 
to label direction If you think diseases 
may pose a problem. 



11 " 5 7- T ~r»w=iy- — t y * li^Lz ij.j\i T tL~* xr? 





Garden Gift Shop & 
Greenhouse 




& Gourds! 




Garden Gift Shop 
Ideas! 

•Wide Variety of Fall Bulbs 

•Halloween Novelties Decorations & 

Jewelry ♦Floral Arrangements 

•Stuffed Animals • Bird Feeders 

■Gardening Books 

"Unique Christmas Treasures" 



Beautiful 

^/;4 Hardy 

Garden 

Mums! 

-Large Assortment 
Of Fall Colors— 

Located at 

300 S. Rt. 83 (1/4 Mi. No. of Midlothian Rd.) 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

. _~J£66-9130 



i\ 



=-■- - "V 



* 1^> 



33G25 



® 



If An Apple A Day Keeps 
The Doctor* Away, Imagine 
What An Orchard Will Do. 

At Bell's Apple Orchard, we are dedicated to bring you the healthiest, best apples In 
texture, quality, taste and freshness. Apples that taste crunchy like an apple is supposed 
to. You owe It to yourself and your family to come visit us soon and enjoy the experience. L 

Facts About Bell's 



FACTS 

ABOUT 

APPLES 




Calories 



60 



Carbohydrates, g 



15 



Fat,g 



Sodium, mg 



Potassium, mg 



115 



Vitamin A, % U.S. R.D.A. 



Vitamin C, % U.S. R.D.A. 



10 



Calcium, % U.S. R.D.A. 



WHILE AT BELL'S VISIT 

• BAKEHYCid** DOR* CMmH Apples, 
Fresh Apple Oa*t and our -FAMOUS" Mia 
Hifflh Apple Piee. 

• CUPS FROZEN CUSTARD- Frown PlM, 

Corm.Six(lMS.Sh«XM.Mita.Fnjtftrvorad. 

• JOHNNY APPUESEED SANDWICH SHOP- 

Sommpiom S*nO*itf»i p*»d w.m U n« lait. 

• FRENCH DOOR BOUTIQUE- Fn«4 IrTOfMd 



me, git Kw*, tfloque reproduction lurr*- 
toi » and many 'decorator" lum. 



The month of October is going to be quite exciting at BefTi. 
Our business has been in Barrington for 55 yoars, bringing the 
highest quality products available to our' customers and 
frlonds. 



3& 




PUMPKINS From 2 to 30 pounds. You can 
pick the perfect pumpkin En our Apple Bam, 
Groat for carving and making the scariest Jack- 
O-Lantem... or just pick one up to take home. 

APPLE CIDER ]2. CARAMEL 

Always fresh and lantelz* JW APPLES 

!^J W? T !■?'•, b .1l!; ^T The perfect treat. 
Cold and has tola of Ahhh fresh and whole' 

■PPeaJ. some and just per- 

fect for autumn. 



BAGGED APPLES for snacWrtg, desserts and 
munching. Red Delicious are ready for picking, pick 
your own at Bell's starting Thursday, September 20th. 

PLUS... 

come enjoy Hay wagon Orchard Tour rides, throughout the 
month of October on weekends from 1 to 4 P.M. Make H a 
point to visit us for our "famous" Pig Roast on October Sth and 
9th. 

Bell's Is open year round from 7 A.M. to 7 P.M. closed major 
holidays at 2 P.M. Closed Christmas and New Yean Day, Hon. 
day Gift baskets shipped UPS starting In November, Christmas 
trees will be an sale starting November 25th. Let us custom 
design corporate gift packages for your clients. 

* P.S. All doctors, health care professionals and pharmaceuti- 
cal personnel always welcome. 



RESERVE YOUR HOLIDAY 

PIE NOW AT BELL'S 
CALL NOW! (708) 438-2211 



DIRECTIONS 



BELL'S FAMOUS 

PIG ROAST 

0CT.8&9 , 6 w A-* t a M 2ST, 



Bell's Apple Orchard* Inc. 
1005 W.Route 22 




HOURS: 7 AM TO 7 PM 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

PICKING HOURS: 9 AM TO 5:30 PM 

(708) 438-2211 




«**>■ 






•♦■♦•*• 



HOLLAND'S 

SPRING-FLOWERING BULBS 
BRING YOU NATURE'S MAGIC! 

•Easy-to-plant 

•Sure-to-bloom 

•Wide assortment available 



Visit our greenhouse. We have 

a wide variety of mums still 

available for fall planting. 



Leiders 



HOURS 

Mon.-Fri. 9 to 6 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. »££?■* 9 , o5 



located 2 miles north of Giayslake on the comer ol Rle. S3 & Lake Street 

223-2432 



i 



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I •.-.».- i J > llri. I | * J » \ 



^^^^^i^aijsi^^i^; 



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There's still plenty of time left for fall planting 



There are several reasons to plant In 
the fall. Soils are still warm from the sum- 
mer and this enables new plants to 
establish themselves quicker. Many 
shade trees as well as certain ornamen- 
tals move easier In the fall, and will then 
provide beauty for the following spring, 
as flowers and leaves emerge. There Is 
nothing like seeing an artistic conifer In 
a winter storm clinging onto the snow. 



Studies Indicate that plant roots^ will 
continue to develop when the soil tem- 
peratures are 37. degrees Fahrenheit and 
above. Many landscapes as well as 
nurseries are digging fresh plant material 
dally, heeling them In before planting, 
then using these plants on Jobs. It's won- 
derful to see landscape Jobs being 
Implemented now that look good, and 
then seeing that job emerge In the.sprtng 



to show color, texture, and movement. 

Now Is a great time to visit garden 
centers or nurseries to see the changing 
colors of certain shade trees. The 
berries, of the ornamentals are quite 
showy this time of the year, as Is the 
bark of the birch trees. 

As the leaves of many trees and 
ornamentals begin to change color, 
the plants shape really jumps out at 



Trees , ornamentals showing fall colors 

•Acer piptanoldes;qnd cultjyqrs> Norway maple sometimes .showing bril- 
liant yellow fall colors. ■ ■ ; /^ :;; " . ■' 

• Acer rubrum ' Bowhall," Bowball red maple^ excellent red fall color, very' 
upright; tight jn; form. " -;V :=>;■?>■ 

•Acer rubrum "Red Sunset,'", Red Sunset red maple, reliable fire-red foliage! 
each fall. ;' : '•:/■ HSvS: - '- ■•'>-' 

•Acer rubrum "October Glory," October Glory red maple, dramatic fire 
red. foliage begins In -October." 

•Acer saccharum "Sugar Maple,* Hots .of red," orange and yellow fall col- '- 
.orlng." Sdmepf the ; cultjVqrs also srxsw yel|dw, apricot and gold colors. 'Vv 
■ -fFraxlhux Amefc^ ash, reliable 

purple fall color each fall. *.-' ; ; : v" 

•Ameldnchier and grqn^lfldra;"AutuVnn Brllllahce'^or "Cole's Select" or 
"Forest Prince^ which Is d.Rby Klehm select^ 
.'..from reds to oranges. This plant a^ 
winner In one!s garden/^ , 

•Betula nigra "River:' BircrV" the J'eWlatlhg bark of the betula nigra ': 
"Heritage" Is outstanding In ^ the.winter. -Also the Betulap 
ca shows nice yellow Tail colors with a graylsr^v^Ite baric color. 
. •Cornusdlternifollar" Pagoda Dc^wqocr ^^ has a layered or tiered effect in 
\the branching for a ornamental effect.. '' > t , ■' , l- 

• Malus, "Rpwering Crabs," seek out ttie' v planfe Interest In 
the.wlnter. Some suggestions are Donald Wynnah^Sugailyrneqnd for branch- 

IJlng interest, tlnq cfqbielther the free Or shrub, form; ^ 

• Pymspdlleryanav Chanticleer" r^ 

standing purple fall leaf cdoratlon^Thls plant.alsd'has.a beautiful white flower 
In the spring, shiny leaves tryoughqutthe summer qnother76utstandlng tree for 
residential sites ~^^ 
■ Nursery, Wadsworth 



■-.-■■■• 



::'\Vv -.' • : p 



Some tips for easy fall cleanup 



Although the problem of what to do 
with fall leaves Isn't going to blow 
away, there are some simple solutions. 

First, grass clippings and finely 
clipped leaves can. be left on your 
lawn. In fact, they actually fertilize the 
soil. That means homeowners don't 
always need to bag fallen leaves, 
especially If they use their lawnmowers 
as leaf shredders. 

The key to replacing your rake with 
your lawn mower Is to finely shred the 
clippings and spread them evenly over 
the lawn. Chopped up leaves that 
cover no more than one-half the grass 
blade do not pose a problem. If you 



cannot see the grass underneath the 
shredded leaves, you'll need to mow 
the lawn a second time. 

For the most effective leaf recycling, 
consider using a mower designed 
especially for chopping leaves and 
grass clippings Into tiny pieces. 

New generation mowers feature 
specially designed blades and deflec- 
tors to cut grass clippings and leaves 
over and over until they fall beneath 
the surface of the grass. An accelera-. 
tor blade feature creates air pressure, 
which Injects the chopped up leaves 
and clippings down into the ground 
where they' are most beneficial. 




MIKE GRECO 
LANDSCAPING 

•LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS 

• CONTRACTORS 

•MAINTENANCE 

GURNEE, IL 60031 
708/855-0590 




your. Be sure to ask your landscaper or 
nurserymen what the plant does the 
rest of the year. 

Many trees and ornamentals espe- 
cially, have something happening 
each season and help to create a gar- 
den with year-round Interest for all to 
enjoy.— by MIKE GRECO, landscape 
architect/owner of Mill Crook Nursery, 
Wadsworlh 



Plants add value to communities 



If you're thinking about selling your 
home, consider the following facts: 

•Landscaping can add between 
seven and 14 percent to a home's 
value. 

•Landscaping can have a recovery 
value of 100 to 200 percent at selling 
time. 

•A mature tree can often have an 
appraised value of between $1,000 to 



$10,000. 

•Landscaping Increases property 
values, which add to the community's 
tax base. 

•Landscaping can speed the sale 
of homes by five to" six weeks. 

•A single urban tree can provide up 
to $273 a year In air conditioning, pollu- 
tion fighting, erosion and storm water 
control, and wildlife shelter benefits. 



ALL FRESHLY DUG FOR FALL PUNTING 



.C.JA i.l,^.*, 



■ate''-"--* """-* ' 








v.", v-vaw.--ii.-»'> w ;-T^sJ-r^^^« 




FALL FOLIAGE UkUm] Newspapers OcTobt* 7, 1994 






.; 



■ 



! 



- ■ 






This fall, composting can be quick and easy 



This fall, a record number of 
American households will participate in 
home composting projects, according 
to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 
Increased Interest Is the result of a vari- 
ety of factors. Including leaf bans at 
local landfills. Increased garbage pick- 
up fees for yard refuse and a desire to 



save the environment. 

While homeowners have been 
forced Into this action, most have been 
pleasantly surprised to find out how sim- 
ple and easy compost is. 

Most people believe composting 
takes a great deal of time and energy, 
and that Is simply not the" case. Plus you 



Begin winterizing roses now to 
protect them from early frost 




Most species 
bush roses, ramblers 
and ever bloom- 
ing types are 
quite capable of 
surviving Lake 
County winters 
without protec- 
tion. 

Hybrid tea 
roses are margin- 
ally hardy In this 
climate so they 
take special care. 
Begin now by collecting 
mulching materials to cover your 
plants. Stockpile some top soil, enough 
for a 10 or 12 Inch mound around each 
plant. Keep the soli where It won't 
freeze up and cover It to keep It dry. 
You will also need some Insulating 
materials such as shredded leaves hay 
or evergreen branches. 

Keep' applying your regular foliar 
fungicides to protect the remaining 
leaves from leafspot and mildew as 
long as they remain on the plant. Keep 
spent blooms cut off as they fade. 

When the last leaves have dropped 
rake as many out of the beds as possi- 
ble to reduce over-wintering diseases, 
and make a fungicide application thor- 
oughly covering the plants and soil. Cut 



back overly long canes so they aren't 
whipped about by winter winds. If you 
plan to use rose cones, cut the planls 
back to appropriate size. 

Mound each plant with a foot of soil. 
When the ground has frozen add 
another 10 or 12 Inches of the organic 
mulch as Insulation to keep the plants 
frozen In. Hold the mulch In place with 
wire, branches, or rose cones. If you use 
cones be sure they are ventilated. They 
can be very warm inside on a bright 
winter day. 

Tree roses and climbing hybrid teas 
created another problem. These plans 
need the same protection as the bush 
teas. Take climbers down from their 
support, mound soil over them, particu- 
larly over the graft union. 

Tree roses have two grafts so they 
are best protected by loosening the 
roots on one side of each plant. Lay the 
plant In a trench and cover with soil 
and mulch. 

Wrapping tree roses with stTaw and 
burlap rarely works here because win- 
ters are so changeable. 

When spring arrives, remove trie 
mulch and wash away the soil mound 
with a strong stream from the garden 
hose. Late spring frosts rarely do any 
damage to roses other than nipping a 
few leaves. 



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can save up to $200 a year on fertilizers 
and garden products by composting 
leaves and grass clippings and then 
mixing the compost Into the soil. 

Follow these tips for successful home 
composting: 

•Ventilation— A bin should be open 
to the earth to ensure that mi- 
croorganisms from the ground can 
Interact and spread Into the compost. 
Also, make sure that your bin has ade- 
quate side and bottom venting. Inade- 
quate ventilation will dramatically slow 
the composting process. 

•Mixing— Blending products that 
are high In carbon (I.e. leaves and saw- 
dust) with products that are high In 
nitrogen (grass clippings, vegetable 
peelings) Is essential for proper com- 
posting. 

The goal Is to achieve a ratio of 



materials that blend a 3-1 carbon/nitro- 
gen ration. 

•Shredding— Shredding leaves and 
other dry lawn debris Is essential to the 
composting process. Reducing the sur- 
face area makes It easier for microbes 
to attack and decompose the materi- 
al. A blower/shredder/vac, makes 
quick, safe work of collecting com- 
posrable materials by shredding .eight 
bags of leaves Into one bag. 

•Watering— Keep the compost 
damp. Water Is essential for proper 
composting. However, a pile that Is too 
wet will begin tosmell. 

•Turning— Composting requires air. 
Turning your pile every two to seven 
days accelerates the process and 
ensures uniform decomposition. Look 
for a compost bin that makes easy, 
clean work of the turning process. 



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OcTobf » 7, 1 994 UkdANd Newspapers IAKEL1FE "" 



,- ;■•; 

• * 1 1 * 




AutumnFest celebrates fall in the forest preserves 



Wagon rides, fall color walks, 
family games, farm animal feed- 
ings and traditional crafts and 
music await visitors to the annual 
Rycrson Woods AutumnFest cel- 
ebration on Sunday, Oct 16, from 
noon to 4 p.m. at the Lake County 
Forest Preserves 1 Rycrson 
Conservation Area near 
Dccrficld. 

AutumnFest celebrates the 
changing of the seasons, when 
autumn colors arc at their peak. 



This traditional family festival, 
sponsored In part by the Friends of 
Rycrson Woods and Skokic-based 
ScariePharmaccuticals, Is a great 
way to spend a wonderful fall after- 
noon out in a forest preserve. 

Lake County Forest Preserve 
naturalists and volunteers will 
lead fall color walks, highlighting 
the bright yellows and reds of the 
maples and oaks, and explaining 
the mystery of how trees change 
color. 



Craft demonstrations will be a 
highlight of this year's Autumn- 
Fest. Old favorites like black- 
smithing, beekeeping and quilt- 
ing will be joined by new demon- 
strations of soap making, rug 
braiding and wood dyeing. Many 
of the artisans will have their 
wares for sale. 

The various activities at 
AutumnFest begin at noon, and 
will run until 4 p.m. Admission is 
$2 for Lake County residents and 



$3 for others; there is free admis- 
sion for members of Friends of 
Rycrson Woods. Refreshments 
are available for an additional 
charge. All ages are welcome. Pets 
arc not permitted. 

The Rycrson Conservation 
Area is located near Dccrficld at 
21950 N. Rivcrwoods Rd., north 
of Deerficld Rd. and south of Half 
Day Rd. (Rte. 22), just west of the 
1-94 tollway. For more informa- 
tion call 948-7750. 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



: 



I 




School, animals help child, family deal with rare disorder 



TINA L. SWIECH - 

Staff Reporter 

Little Kimbcrly Scfiultz runs and jumps like the other 
first graders in her class. She loves to listen to music and 
roller skate with her big sister, Jenny. 

But the 7-ycar-old is different from her classmates. 
The Spring Grove girl known as Kimber has what is called 
Rett syndrome — a failure to communicate with others. 

Her mother, Sherry, explained there arc only about 
3,000 people in the world recognized with Rett, which is 
just now beginning to be understood. 

It Is not known why only girls get the disease. The dis- 
ease is usually noticed in females ages 2 to 5-years-old, 
explained Sherry who has done much research to under- 
stand the mysterious affliction of her youngest child. 

For years, children with the same symptoms as Kimber 
would more often than not be misdiagnosed by well- 
meaning physicians. "Mental retardation" or "cerebral 
palsy" were among the most common diagnoses. Kimber 
was diagnosed as having "autistic tendencies." 

Sherry's turning point in accepting Kimbcr's disease, 
came after an accurate diagnosis and the insight of a 
friend, Betty Best . Best lost her son, who was in his 20s, 
in a car accident. 

Grayslakc resident Best went to Sherry's side during 
her year-long stint of being sad, angry, bitter and general- 
ly miserable about life; Living for today, was her friends 

basic theory. " 

' Why are you like this? You just don't know how long 
you'll have anyone you love,' " Betty told Sherry. These 
were the words Kir.iber's mother heard that helped the 
family changed their and Kimbcr's lives. 

"She fits in just fine with us," said Sherry. "It's not as 
bad as you think. In fact it's not bad, period,^ the mother 

explained. 

At the age of in months, Kimber began school. She 



attended a special parent- infant class with her mother at a physical and occupational therapists, arc also on hand to 

Lake County sponsored center. Children arc accepted help Kimber. 

into the program from infancy. Hill teaches Kimber in the same classroom with the 

Then when she was 2, Kimber began attending bchav- other children, learning basically the same subjects, but at 

lor modification therapy three times a week. The program different levels. "We arc allowing her to vocalize," said 

was called "Tuesdays Child." The school is renowned for Hill. 

their high use of praise with disabled kids. This is the Fleshman was asked how she feels about including the 

place where the self-abusing, head-banging child smiled handicapped girl into a regular classroom. "We feel that 

for the very first time, said Sherry. each individual case needs to be looked at separately and 

Kimber then went to a school housed within the John this case with Kimber has shown to be the school working 

Powers School for Hearing Impaired Children in Vernon as a collaborative team effort on the parts of the parents 



Hills. Her mother said she did so well there she went on to 
a combined program which included a half-day of handi- 
capped schooling and half-day In a "main- 
stream" program. She also began vitamin and 
music therapy. She began full-time schooling at 
the age of 3. 

The adorable little blond, who may be occa- 
sionally be seen wringing her hands in frustra- 
tion over not being able to communicate, has 
accomplished a historic feat. 

This year Kimber became the first inclusion 
student to start with other first graders at Forest 
School in Fox Lake. 

Principal Joanne Fleshman explained there 
was a lot of pre-planning involved before 
Kimber started this fall. Meetings with the staff 
at La re mo n t School were attended by Fleshman 
and Kimbcr's current teacher Vlcki Hill. 

Workshops and in-service seminar's were 
attend by the Forest teachers to prepare them 
for the new student. Principal Fleshman praised 
the "professional way" Hill and new teacher's 
aide Dana Staff present themselves with the 
challenge of working with the new student each day. 

The principal noted Lisa llenning and Mary Worth, 



and staff," said the principal. "We feel we are definitely 
See DISORDER page B10 





3H LAKELIFE UkfiUfd Newspapers Ocrobc. 7, 1994 






- 






1 1 . 

■ ■ 






'fi 



i . ■ 



Kids Fare 



'Kids need Culture, Too' at Northbrook Theatre 



■ 



Northbrook Theatre presents: 
"Kids need Culture, Too!" Oct 8. 
The show features The Illinois 
Juggling Institute juggling show 
and workshop for the entire fam- 
ily. Performance Is at 2 p.m. All 
Seats $5. For tickets call 291- 
2367. 

Hansel and Gretel opens 

The College of Lake County's 
children's production, "Hansel 
and Gretel" by Moses Goldberg, 
will open at 10 a.m. Oct 7 at the 
CLC auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Grayslake. The 
play will be repeated at 1 p.m., 
Oct 7, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 8 
and 2 p.m., Oct. 9. The play will 
also be performed at 2 p.m., Oct. 
16 at Lake Zurich High School. 

In Commedia dell' Arte and 
Oriental theater styles, a group of 
actors will present a charming 
new adaptation to this famous 
fairy tale of the two children, a 
wicked witch and the famous 
Gingerbread house. The play is 
directed by Robert J. Coscarelli, a 
theatre instructor at CLC. 

Tickets are $7 general admis- 
sion and $5 for children, CLC stu- 
dents and alumni. 

Wizard of Oz set to music 

. The Papal Players will present 
a one-hour musical fantasy for 
children , "The Wizard of Oz," will 
be performed at the Cutting Hall 

Disorder — 

From page B9 

being successful with Kimber." 

Kimber likes physical move- 
ment and that encourages her to 
talk. 

Right now she knows 12 
words, many learned from a trip 
she took to the Florida Keys 
where she swam with the dol- 
phins. 

When Kimber's uncle, John 
Demski of Libertyviile, was in 
Grassy Key, Fla., he visited the 
Dolphin Research Institute and 
asked physiologist Dr. Dave 
Nathanson if he thought his spe- 
cial program could help Kimber. 
The doctor felt the program could 
help and Sherry and Kimber's 
father, Greg, began planning for 
the trip. 

Clinic psychologist Dr. 
Nathanson showed Targe pic- 
tures to Kimber. If she were able 
to repeat the word of the object, 
Kimber would be rewarded by 
letting her swim in the warm 
waters of the Gulf of Mexico with 
friendly Atlantic bottle nose dol- 
phins. 

Mother and daughter donned 
life jackets, signed a release and 
jumped into the 40-foot deep 
lagoon, where swimming with 
the dolphins was an almost 
dreamlike play that both enjoyed 
tremendously. 

At one point Sherry said she 
held onto the dorsal Tin of a dol- 
phin who carried her out quite a 
way, and then returned to 
retrieve her. 

"By the time wc left, she said 
three words," recalls Sherry of the 
trip to Florida they would like to 
take again. 

"Vanilla," a golden retriever 
Kimbcrly has had for over a year, 
has also helped with therapy. She 
, gets excited when she sees the 
dog, and has learned to say some 
new words because of him, 
according to her parents. 

Although doctors have said 
Retts patients don't usually live 
past their teens due to heart fail- 
ure or muscle deterioration, 
Kimberly is not wheelchair 
bound as her parents were once 



In Palatine, 150 East Wood. 

Performances are scheduled 
for Oct 10 at 10:30 and 12:30 
a.m. Ticket price is $5. Advanced 
group purchases are available. 
For more information call 359- 
9556. 

Sounds of Jazz 

In honor of Dizzy Gillespie's 
birthday and the sounds of jazz 
music In general, children will 
create and listen to music Oct 
21- 23 at the Kohl's Children 
Museum, 165 Green Bay Road, 
WUmette. 

Daily activities take place at 
10:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 
p.m. Admission to the museum 
is $3 per person, children under 
one year are free. For more infor- 
mation, call 256-6056. 

Aladdin on Ice returns 

Walt Disney's World on Ice- 
Aladdin returns to be the first 
family entertainment event at the 
new United Center, 1901 West 
Madison, Chicago. The $8 mil- 
lion theatrical skating spectacle, 
which played to sold-out audi- 
ences earlier this year at the 
Roscmont Horizon and Chicago 
Stadium, is the first Walt Disney 
World on Ice production to play a 
same-year encore engagement in 
Chicago. 

Tickets for Walt Disney's 
World on Ice — Aladdin are on 



sale at the United Center box 
office and all Tlcketmaster out- 
lets. Prices are $10.50, $15.50 and 
$18.50 with a $3 discount for chil- 
dren under 12 at selected perfor- 
mances. To order tickets by 
phone call (312) 559-1212. For 
general information, call (312) 
559-1212. 

Greatest Show returns 

Tickets are now on sale for the 
all-new 124th edition of the. 
Ringling Bros, and Barnum and 
Bailey Circus, a colorful, surprise- 
filled tribute to the newest mem- 
bers of the circus family — 
Romeo and Juliet— the first baby 
elephants bom and bred to The 
Greatest Show on Earth. 

The month-long Chicago-area 
engagement opens at the new 
United Center, Nov. 16-27 and 
then plays at the Rosemont 
Horizon, Nov. 29 - Dec 11. 

The two-hour-plus produc- 
tion features non-stop circus 
action accompanied by live 
music 

Tickets arc now on sale at 
both the United Center Box Office 
and the Roscmont Horizon Box 
Office as well as Tlcketmaster 
locations. Prices are: $9.50, 
$11.50; $13.50 and $15.50 with a 
$2 discount for children under 12 
at selected performances. To 
order tickets by phone, call 312- 
559-1212. 



-Into tNe NiqriT— 

Friday 

Redeye Express will be the opening act for Mitch Ryder at 
Shades in Dcerficld, Oct. 7. Tickets available at Tlcketmaster. $10 
cover. r - 

Saturday 

Redeye Express performs at Rainbows, 432 Sheridan in 
H ighwood, Oct 0. Lonnle Brooks performs Blues at Shades, 
21860 N. Milwaukee Ave., Deerfleld. 

Sunday 

Redeye Express hosts an open jam at T.B. Waters, 130 
Washington, Ingleside, Oct 9. For information call 587-1538. — 
fey CLAUDIA M. LENARX 



1995 forest preserve picnic 
reservations open Oct. 15 



warned she may be by her pre- 
sent age. 

"She's a miracle child," said 
Sherry who tries to make each 
day count for Kimber so she has 
the best quality of life possible. 



Sherry said the current pro- 
gram Kimberly is in has helped 
above everything else. "Without 
that program (at Forest School), 
and without the teachers there, it 
would not work," she said. 



Wednesday at 10 a.m. is the deadline for 
Classified Ads...Don't Forget 



ALREADY EXTENDED 
BY POPULAR DEMAND! 

ON SALE NOW FOR PERFS. 
NOVEMBER 22 -JANUARY 1 









f* 



r*,*-. 



/ 



/' 



SS/a 



Plan-ahead picnickers should 
mark their calendars for Sunday, 
Oct. 15, the first day the Lake 
County Forest Preserves will 
issucpicnlc permits for 1995. 
From 8 am. to 4 p.m., people can 
apply for picnic penilts at the 
Forest Preserve's General Offices, 
2000 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Libertyviile. 

"Picnic Permit Day is a Lake 
County Forest Preserve tradi- 
tion," said Colin L McRae, forest 
preserve president "Again this 
year, we will award the first per- 
son to make a reservation a per- 
mit at no charge." 

"We usually issue more than 
200 permits the first day. Our 20 
Forest Preserve shelters range in 
capacity up to 700 people," said 
McRae, "People who want a spe- 



cific location and date arc 
encouraged to come in early." 

All groups wishing to reserve 
a picnic shelter arc required to 
buy a permit. Shelters are avaial- 
able in six different preserves: 
Grant Woods near Fox Lake, 
Greenbelt near Waukegan, Hall 
Day near Vernon Hills, lake wood 
near Wauconda, Old School neat 
Libertyviile, and Van Patten 
Woods near Wadsworth. 

Depending on group size, 
permit fees range from $25 to 
$200 for Lake County residents, 
and from $60 to $400 for othct 
picnickers. Accommodations for 
groups of 700 or more will be 
arranged on an individual, con- 
tractual basis. 

For additional information 
call 367-6640. 



Master Hypnotist 
Jim Wand 

presented by 

College of Lake County 

October 1 3 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. 

CLC auditorium 

Self-Hypnosis for Self-Improvement 
Seminar on October 14 from 8 AM to 10 AM 

Tickets: October 13 Performance 

General Public $ 4 CLC/Alumni *2 
October 14 Seminar M0 

For tickets or information, call 223-6601 ext. 2300 



Les Miserables I 

STILL THE WORLDS MOST POPULAR MUSICAL K 



CALL THE LES MIZ HOTLINE: (312) 559-2900 (7 Days a Week) 

Tickets also available at the Box Office and Tlcketmaster Centers 

including Carson Pine Scott. Rose Records & Blockbuster Music. 

$16 student seats available for certain performances at the box office only with valid student 1.0. 

GROUP SALES HOTLINE: (312) 431-2357 



REAL ESTATE & FURNITURE 

AUCTION 
Saturday, October 15, 1994 - 11:UO a.m. 



LOCATION: 37025 Delany Road, Gumee, Illinois. 2 1/2 miles north of 
Grand Avenue and approximately 1 1/2 miles south of Yorkshire Road. 

REAL ESTATE 

Approximately 3/4 acre comer lot, 4 bedrooms, living room, dining room, den, 
2 1/2 baths, kitchen, 2 car garage, finished basement. Approximately 2,200 
square feet. Electric heat, air, well and septic. Close to shopping, schools 
and church. 

TERMS ON REAL ESTATE: 
10% down with bid, balance at closing. Financing available to qualified 
buyers. For more information, call Herman Behm at 708-395-1941. Real 
estate subject to seller's confirmation. Starting bid: M20.000. 

REAL ESTATE SHOWING: 
Sunday, October 9, 1994 - 2:00-4:00 p.m. 

FURNITURE 

il & Signed Lithos; Fine Art with Frames; Living Room Couch, Like New; 

ining Room Set; Oak Round Table with Chairs; Maple Table; Curved 
eacon Bench; Antiques; Carnival Glass; 2 Televisions; Lamps; Restaurant 
Booth; Gas Stove; Refrigerator; Picnic Table; Bedroom Sets & Dresser; Fife 
Cabinet; Sewing Machine; Ladder; Mower; Hand & Garden Tools; Plus 
Misc©!l3n60U3 

TERMS ON FURNITURE: Cash or Good Check. 
BETTY CARRIER, Owner 



AUDITORIUM THEATRE oi huosivhi uhivihmit sot am iuni.h^s wuuwat 



HERMAN BEHM, AUCTIONEER 

708-395-1941 










OcTobe«7, 1994 UI<e1an 




- 



pew LAKEUrt Af ngj 




':*■ 






F.Y.I 





Sleuth* 

Bowon Park Theatre 
Company presents the smash 
hit thriller "Sleuth" at 
GoodfclloW Halt, Waukegan. 
Remaining play dates arc Ocl , 
6, 7 and 8. Show times are 8 
p.m. Call 360-4741 for tickets 
and details. 



'Annie* 

PM&L Theatre opens its 
34th season with . the 
Broadway hit "Annie" on the new 
stage and expanded theater building 
at 877 Main St,, Antioch. Production 
dates are Oct 7, 8 and 9. Curtain time 
Is 8 p.m. for Friday and Saturday 
dates and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. 
Advance reservations are $9 for 
adults, $7 for students and senior cit- 
izens. Reservations can be made by 
calling 395-3055. 

'La Cage Aux Foiled 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents "La Cage Aux Folles" 
through Oct. -30. It Is "everything 
you've always wanted In a musical— 
but nothing you'd expect" Perfor- 
mance schedule is Wednesdays at 2 
and 8 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays at 
8 p.m.; Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; 
and Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. 
Tickets to ail performances are 
$32.50. Dinner packages are avail- 
able. Call 634-0200 for ticket informa- 
tion. 



'Incorruptible' 

"Incorruptible," a play by 
Michael Hollinger, will be presented 'ApplaUSe* 
by Stage Two Theater, 12 N. Sheridan 
Rd., ' Waukegan through Oct 9. 
"Incorruptible" Is a play about. a 
stormy and hilarious depiction of the 
medieval Catholic Church. Tickets 



arc $10, $8 for students, seniors and 
military personnel. Call 662-7088. 

'Anna Karenina' 

Apple Tree Theatre, 595 Elm Pl„. 
Highland Park, presents the Midwest 
premiere of the newly revised "Anna 
Karenina," which is scheduled to run 
..through OcL 30. It is a. tragic portrait 
of the moral and psychological dilem- 
mas of life in czarlst Russia. This 
musical event brings all of the passion, 
and Irony of the classic love story 
vividly to life. Tickets are $22 and $24. 
For ticket Information call 432-4335. 

Waukegan Players 

Zlon and Waukegan arc joining 
forces In the Waukegan Community 
Players ■< production of . "The 
Stonecutter and the Mountain God" 
playing Oct 8 at 3 and 8 p.m. and Oct 
9 at 3 p.m. at Melba Wixorn 
Auditorium. For ticket Information 
call 662-0181. 

Scrooge auditions 

The Waukegan Community 
Players will hold auditions Sunday 
and Monday, Oct 9 and 10 for their 
production of "Mr. Scrooge" being 
directed by Mona L Drinkall. 
Auditions begin at 1 p.m. oh Sunday 
and 7 p.mon Monday at Rosenwald 
Cottage in Bowen Parle Waukegan, 
1923 N. Sheridan Rd. Parts are avail- 
able for all ages. Participants should 
have. a song prepared. The show Is 
scheduled to run Dec, 2, 3, 4. More 
information Is available by calling 
662-0181. 



Northbrook Theatre, 3323 
Walters Ave., Northbrook, opens their 
1994-95 season with "Applause," the 
musical version of "All About Eve." 
Performance dates are Oct 14, 15, 21, 



22, 23, 28, 29, Nov. 4 and 5. 
Performances Friday and Saturday 
evenings at 8 p.m., Sundays at 3 p.m. 
Saturday, Oct 15 is singles night 
Meet and greet after ihe show. 
Sunday, Oct 23 matinee, signed for 
the hearing impaired. Tickets arc $12 
at the door, $10 paid in advance. 

Nutcracker tickets 

Tickets for Dancentcr North's 
production of "The Magic of the 
Nutcracker" will go on sale Oct 17 at 
10 a.m. at Dancenter North, 540 N. 
Milwaukee Ave,- in Libertyville. 
Performances at Libertyville High 
School's Butler Auditorium arc Dec. 
10 at 2 and 7:30 p.m., Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. 
Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec 17 and 
18 at 2p.m. Ticket prices range from 
$8 to $16 with discounts for senior cit- 
izens, students and group. For more 
information call 367-7970. 

Singers needed 

Female singers are wanted 
for a major fall performance. 
Chorus rehearsals are held at 
Faith Lutheran Church, Rte. 
41 and Deerpath Rd., Lake 
Forest- from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
on Monday, nights. . Call 680- 
1116 or 234-0703 and leave a 
message. 

Piano dedication 

Barrington's Lyric and 
Children's Choir voices, Suzuki 
strings, and additional glorious 
sounds from piano, cello and trom- 
bone will fill the air on Sunday, Oct 9 
in the Barring ton Area Library's meet- 
ing room during die dedication of the 
library's Kawai grand piano.' The 
piano was donated by North 
Barrington's Wanda and Jim 
Hollensteiner, long time Barrlngton 
Lyric members. The dedication pro- 







TIRED OF DIETING? 

WHY NOT TRY A SUCCESSFUL 
ALTERNATIVE! 

Lose weigh! in onl y 5 Hy pnosis Sessions and learn HOW to 

• Think Thin and Think Healthy! 

• Gain self-esteem 

• Motivate yourself 

• Enjoy regular exercise 

• Lose weight gradually 

• Permanent behavior changes 

YOU CAN succeed; 

Call for information 
James R.. Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 






gram will begin at 2 p.m. with piano 
selections by Barbara Crooks Endcrs 
ofWauconda. 

Other performers will Include 
soprano Laurel Gibson, Crystal Lake; 
flute solo by Diane Horban accompa- 
nied by Walter Horban; 17-year-old 
cellist Ani Aznavoorlan, Barrlngton, 
accompanied by Enders; trombone 
solo by Bob Plagemann. 

A stringed quartet of students 
from the Suzuki School under the 
direction of Mary Ncal McCammon, 
Barrlngton; and' the Barrlngton 
Children's Choir director by Peggy 
Crawford, Barrlngton, and accompa- 
nied by Nancy Kozel, Barrlngton. 

For further information call 382- 
1300, ext 22. 

Chicago Slnf onietta 

The gala opening of the Chicago 
Slnfonletta will take place at Rosary 
College in River Forest on Sunday, 
OcL 9 at 2:30 p.m., and at Orchestra 
Hall on Wednesday, OcL 12 at 7:30 
p.m. Featured soloists in boih con- 
. certs will be pianist Leon Bates and 
cellist Borislav Strulev. For ticket 
information call (312)857-1062, 

Adler conceits 

The David Adler Cultural Center, 
1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville 
will hold a blues, ballads and originals 
music concert featuring Mary Flower 
and Itm Craig on Friday, OcL 7 at 8 
p.m. in the Adler House Ballroom. On 
OcL 15, singer-songwriter, James 
McCandlcss wilt perform at 8 p.m. 
Admission is SB for adults, $5 for 
members, seniors, children under 16. 
Call 367-0707 for further information. 

Big Band Sound 

The Big Band Sound of Decrfield 
will provide musical entertainment' 
from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, OcL 15 in 



SHARE YOUR BLESSINGS 

WTTH THE WEEDY 

THIS THANKSGIVING 

AND WE'LL GIVE YOU A 

FREE CLASSIFIED AD 

Let's make sure no local residents go 
hungry this holiday season. Donate 4 
cans of food and you will receive 
'. a free classified ad (25 words or less) 

expired, dented or 
rusted cans will be 
. accepted. 

Cans must have labels. 

Only Market Guide 
and Transportation 
' ads accepted. 

•Private Party only. 



i*. 356 - 2675 or 1 «f 1M 9 



I 



. t<v 



i ' 




Drop off your food contribution in 

person at our office between 

8am and 6pm, Mon.-Fri. 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 8. Whitney St. 
Gray slake, 1L 60030 

Food will be donated- to alocal PAD.S. Shelter in your community. 



the Dcerflcld Plaza, Decrfield Road 
and Waukegan Road, as part of the 
DeerTicld Rotary Pumpkinfesl The 
concert will feature arrangements for 
Big Band of TV and movie themes 
and famous rock and Latin tunes. The 
bands 50th concert season is under 
the direction of Bob Gand. The vocal 
soloist Is La na Rac, The group is spon- 
sored by the Dcerflcld Park DiL and Is 
open to musicians with high school or 
college band experience. For infor- 
mation call Bill CotUc at 446-9496. 

■ 

Symphony opens 

The North Suburban Symphony 
will open its seventh season at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 E. Illinois 
Rd., Lake Forest at 4 p.m. on Sunday, 
Oct 16 in Baggett Auditorium Dr. 
Allan Dennis will conduct The open- 
ing program of the season will feature 
Franz von Suppe's "Poet and PEasant 
Overture" and will Introduce the 
1994-95 season's theme "Meet the 
Masters." He will play with the 
orchestra Edward Elgar's Cello 
Concerto. The concert will close with 
Ludwig van Beethoven's "Symphony 
Number Four. Ticket information can 
be obtained by calling 926-8554. 

lyric Opera 

On Friday, OcL 14, a luxury motor 
coach will await members and guests 
of the Barrlngton Chapter of Lyric 
See PYI page B12 






WeLcome 

WAqoN 

Helpful Civic information 
to acquaint you with 
your community. Call I 
the "Welcome Wagon 
representative so that 
she may visit you. 

Antioch 

Karen 
356.6377 

Fox Lake/lngleside 

Gena 
973-0920 

Fox Lake/Spring Grove 

Sherry 
587-1626 

Grayslake 
Lake Villa 
Wlldwood 

Viola Linda 

336-5971 223-1607 



-.'■:. i ' i.-'Mr: . > : ' .' 



Gurn< 

Path* - Linda 

223-6498 735-0650 

Ing [aside 

Gena 
973-0920 

Lake Zurich 

Ann Jeanette 

540-5790 438-9049 

Libertyville 

Sally 
680-1599 

Lincolnshire 

Letty " 
945-3161 

Long Grove 

Klldeer 

Hawthorn Woods 

Bonnie 
540-7981 

Mundeleln 

Karen 
566-4263 

Round Lake Area 

Phebe Priscilla 

223-6504 740-3163 

Vernon Hills 

Letty Maureen 

945-3161 949-6926 

You are entitled to a compli- 
mentary subscription from your 
hometown newspaper. To re- 
ceive your paper, contact your 
Welcome Wagon representative 
or call Lakeland Newspapers at 
(708) 223-8161. For information 
about positions with the Wel- 
come Wagon .call Maria at 
(708) 577-3637.:. ■ 



;-w... ■ 




LAKE LIFE LaIceM Newspapers OcTobia 7, 1994 









- 









FYI 



From page Bll 

Opera of Chicago at Lagendorf Park in 
Barrington for a 6:30 p.m. boarding. 
The musical journey to Monastero's 
Ristorantc In Chicago will include 
complimentary wine and cheese. An 
Italian dinner will be followed with 
dessert, and Bel Canto entertain- 
ment The bus will return to 
Lagendorf Park by 11:30 p.m. 
Rayncttc Seger will take reservations 
until Oct. 7. Call 381-1589. Members 
$35, guests S40. 

Apple Muncher 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club Is sponsoring an Apple Muncher 
dance with guest caller Ron Smejkal 
calling squares and Elissa Pischkc 
cueing rounds. The dance will be held 
Friday, Oct 7 with dancing from 8:30 
to 11 p.m. with a plus Up at 11 p.m. 
and round dance workshops from 8 
to 8:30 p.m. The dance will be held at 
First United Methodist Church, 128 
N. LTtica SL, Waukegan. Call 623-6422 
for further details. 

'Harvest Hoedown* 

An old time barn dance the 
"Harvest Hoedown" will be held at 
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct 8 at the Park 
District Building, 42 S. Seymour in 
Grayslake. All age groups, with or 
without partners or square dancing 



experience are invited to attend the 
barn dance. Free dance lessons will 
be offered at 7 p.m. Admission is $3 
per person. 

Friday night dance 

Solo Singles will sponsor a Friday 
Night Dance on Oct. 7 at the Princess, 
1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libcrtyville. 
The dance begins at 8:30 p.m. Also, 
on Wednesday, Oct 12 Solo will hold 
their weekly dance at the Princess 
from 8 p.m. to midnight Call 016- 
1011 for further Information. 

Lake Promenaders 

The Lake Promenaders Square 
Dance Gub is holding a dance on 
Saturday, Oct 15 at Oak Grove 
School, 1700 S. O'Plaine Rd., Green 
Oaks, Libcrtyville. Rounds start at 
7:45 p.m. with Joyce and George 
Kammercr cueing. Squares start at 
8:15 p.m. with caller Lin Jarvis. For 
further information call 223-4012. 

Walk rf Dodgers 

The Walk N' Dodgers Square 
Dance Club is holding a dance on 
Sunday, Oct 16 at Viking Park 
Community Center, 4374 Old Grand 
Ave., Gurnee. Cuer Doris Palmen will 
start a rounds workshop at 6:30 p.m. 
Plus level squares start at 7 p.m. with 
caller Ron Smejkal. 







Mlllburn Gallery 

The "Swing," an oil paint- 
ing by Gurnee artist, Ann 
Otis, will welcome guests to a 
fall show and reception oh 
Friday, Oct 7. Otis Is well 
known for her viscosity etch- 
ings. Exhibiting with Otis are 
Judy BJorllng, watercolors; 
Diane Fcdyna, oils; and 
Diane Schrocdcr, China 
painting. The opening reccp- 



-r-SpEciAl Events 



tioii will be held from 5 to 7:30 p.m. 
The Mlllburn Gallery is located at 
38500 N. Rtc. 45, Mlllburn Historic 
District, Old Mill Creek. For addition- 
al information and gallery hours call 
356-3022. The show will continue 
through the month of October. • 

Pewter showcase 

Visiting artists Michael Boycttand 
Ann McGrory will introduce their 
newest sculptures at Pewter 
Showcase, 206 McHenry Rd., Buffalo 
Grove on Oct 15 and 16 from noon to 
4 p.m. Pewter Showcase, which has 
more than 200 sculptures on display, 
will feature the artists' newest cre- 
ations, "He Who Taunts the Enemy" 
and "Brother Wolf," during their visiL 
A reception is planned for the artists 
and guests of the gallery who wish to 
meet the artists. For further informa- 
tion call 634-0620. 



Volo Antique Auto Museum to host collector car expo 




There will be a pig roast both 
days and beverages of all kinds 
will be available. 

Anyone wishing to enter a car 
or bid on the cars should call Volo 
Auction * headquarters at 
(815)385-8408. 

Specatator admission is $8 for 
adults and $3 for children to age 
12. The Volo Antique Auto 
Museum is on Rtc. 120, one half 
mile west of Rte. 12, Rand Road, 
in Volo. 



I 



BAHS antique show, sale set 

The Barrington Area Historical Society {BAHSJ will hold Its annual 
antique show and sale Saturday, Oct 8 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, 
Oct 9 from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Antiques IV will be held at the Cunco 
Museum and Garden located at 1350 N. Milwaukee Ave. In Vernon Hills. 
Admission is $7. Call 381-1766 for further information. 

'City lights' comes to Round Lake 

"City Lights'' is comprised of 12 singers from Lake County and is spon- 
sored by the Mundcleln Park Dist Ticket price is $5 for adults, $3 children 
under 12. The performances will be held at Round Lake Community Church 
at 3:30 and 7 p.m. There will also be an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner 
from 5 to 7 p.m. Dinner price Is $5 for adults, 43 children under 12, with no 
charge for children under 3. Call 546-2726 for further information. 

Six Flags teams up with DARE 

Saturday, Oct 8, Six Flags Great America will celebrate Its annual DARE 
Day, marking the park's support of the Drug Awareness Resistance 
Education programs In Illinois and southern Wisconsin with reduced-rate •■ 
tickets available through DARE officers. For further ticket Information call 
249-2133, exL 6100. 

Buffalo Creek grand opening 

Fall color walks, entertainment and refreshments await visitors to 
Buffalo Creek Forest Preserve near Buffalo Grove and Long Grove on 
Sunday, Oct 9 when the Lake County Forest Preserves celebrate the grand 
opening of mis new preserve from 2 to 4 p.m. Boy Scout Troop 100 from 
Buffalo Grove will kick-off me event at 2 p.m. with a flag raising ceremony, 
followed by a ribbon-cutting. Music, an apple swing, and face painting will 
also be part of the afternoon festivities. The entrance to Buffalo Creek Forest 
Preserve Is located on Checker Road just west of Arlington Heights Road and 
north of Lake Cook Road near Buffalo Grove. For more information call 367- 
3676, exL 122. 

'The Aussie's are coming!' 

The Australian hit musical comedy duo "Scared WIcrd Little Guys" are 
taking the country by storm and make their first Zanies appearance on 
Sunday, Oct. 9. Zanies is located at 1548 N. Wells SL, Chicago. Call (312)337- 
4027 for ticket information. 

Learn how to start child care home 

Learn how to start a family child care home at the Warren-Newport ' 
Public Library, 224 N. O'Plaine Rd„ Gurnee, Wednesday, OcL 12 from 7 to 9 
p.m. Offered by the Child Care Resource and Referral YWCA of Northeastern 
Illinois. To register call 662-4247. 

Hypnotist Wand to appear at CLC 

Master hypnotist Jim Wand will present two performances and a semi- 
nar at the College of Lake County, 19351 W. Washington St Grayslake. The 
performances will be held at 7 and 9 p.m. Oct 13 and the seminar, "Self- 
Hypnosis for Self-Improvement," will be held from 8 to 10 a.m. Oct 14 in 
the auditorium on the Grayslake campus. Tickets are $4, $2 for CLC students 
and alumni. Registration fee for the seminar is $10. Call 223-6601, ext 2300 
for further Information. 



Bill Grams, Volo auction director, with a 1930 La Sail© Cabriolet. 



The Kruse International 
Chicago Fall '94 Collector Car 
Expo and Auction will be held 
Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 15 and 
16, at 10 a.m. at the Volo Antique 
Auto Museum grounds in Volo. 

Some of America's top power 
cars and rare classic cars are 
entered, including a 1968 Shelby 
GT500KR CI Ram Air Convertible, 
1969 Plymouth GTX 426 Hemi 



Roadrunner, 1970 Chevelle LS-6 
450 Convertible, 1930 LaSalle 
Cabriolet, 1931 V-12 Limosine, 
and a 1954 Rolls Roycc Silver 
Wraith. 

Another highlight of the event 
is the grand opening of the Volo 
Antique Auto Museum's new 
showcase within its third build- 
ing. The museum is celebrating 
its 33rd anniversary. 



Relief From The O'Hare Headache 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Construction on the Toll way, inside parking at M8 per day, a long walk (or run) 
to your gate through a mass of humanity, just to find your plane Is delayed 
because the air traffic around O'Hare is as much a mess as the confusion on the 
ground. Thafs the markings of one "tuff Excedrln headache!" 

Next time try MKE. 

MKE Is the code for Milwaukee's General Mitchell Field Airport and can also be 
defined as "Relief" for those suffering from an ORD (O'Hare) headache. 

I flew from Mitchell Field last weekend and had almost forgotten how relaxing 
leaving from this airport could be. 

The drive to Mitchell will most likely take less time than to O'Hare, since you'll 
find little traffic, some minor construction around Kenosha and a 65 MPH speed 
limit. The airport is located right off 1-94 just before you get to Milwaukee. 

Once you exit, ifs only about a minute to the parking lot, where you'll get your 
first suprise. Inside parking Is only *5 per day! No long walk to your gate, either. In 
fact, It took me less than five minutes to walk from the parking lot to Northwest's 
furthest gate. A tip, park on level three. Ifs connected directly to the terminal, with 
no need to take an elevator. 

Since you probably got to the airport early and have some time to kill, MKE Is 
ready for you. 

Check out the used book store. We're not talking a few dog-eared paperbacks. 
This store has a selection of hardcover books that rivals some small town 
libraries. I found several shelves on one of my hobbles, antique furniture. 

There's also a free Air Museum where you can find anything from the history of 
airmail, to models of jet cockpits, to an exhibit on PSP, a portable runway materia! 
many of we Vietnam Vets are familiar with. 

If you just want to sit and relax, grab a cone at the Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream 
Shoppe or a Croissant at the Bake shop and watch the big screen TV In the 
lobby. 

So to avoid the ORD headache, ask your travel agent to prescribe MKE before 
your next trip. ' 



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CHoom Mowapopen 

DAntloch News-Reporter 
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I 






LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 




m&iM :<M^^^immi 



A parent's secret weapon 

(or how to outsmart your kids) 



There comes a time in your 
children's lives when they believe 
themselves to be smarter than 
you. Actually, they believe that 
it's a miracle you even have them 
as children since no one knows 
how you figured out where babies 
come from- You'll realize when 
that time has come: It's. usually 
around the age that ends in 
"teen," like four-teen, fif-teen or 
even Oval-tine. Yes, as they 
become teenagers, you become 
cranium impaired. 

Occasionally it happens that 
your children are right, though 
you'd rather sit through 10 hours 
of Senate hearings before admit- 
ting it. They are smarter. When 
they ask for your help with their 
honors class homework, you take 
one look at the assignment and 
say, "Ooh — ow— it's those hem- 
orrhoids again. I've got to go lay 
down. I'm sorry — you'll have to 
try and figure it out without me 
this time." They give you that 
disgusted look, as they try to dis- 
pel the mental picture you've* 
conjured up of old people with 
hemorrhoids. You're off the 
hook. But not for long. 

About now you may be say- 
ing, who cares? Or better yet, 
you're saying, tell us, Donna— 
what can we do about it? Heck if 
I know. . 

Just kidding. There is a possi- 
ble solution, and you'll pinch 




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yourself when I tell you, since it's 
so easy (or if you prefer, have 
your spouse pinch you — either 
way is acceptable). You've heard 
it from your own parents, and . 
they heard it from their parents 
before them, who heard it from 
the cave people. Here it is^-you 
are going to use the old "common 
sense discourse" (as in, "dis 
course is about common sense"). 

Next time your teen says to 
you, "Mom (or Dad), you haven't 
learned anything new since Elvis 
died", you will smile and look 
smug. Then drop the bomb. 
"Listen — I may not understand 
the new math, or why you listen 
to music by bands with names 
like Pumpkins on Prozac, but I 
have something better. I 
have... Common Sense." 

Now it is their turn to smile 
and look smug. "Uh huh. 
Common sense. Like I don't, 
right? lust what do you call 
"common sense"?" 

"You see? That's just it If you 
have to ask what it is, you certain- 
ty don't have it. It's usually 
acquired with age and experi- 
ence." They are still smiling and 
looking smug. "Like you, I sup- 
pose." 

"Don't get smart Here's an 
example— last week you drove to 
the" store, got out of the car, 
locked the doors and forgot to 
remove your keys. Now, if you 



had any common sense, you 
would always check to make sure 
you have your keys before you 
lock the doors." 

"Oh....I get it Sort of like 
when you locked yourself out of 
the house two days ago." 

"Exactly. I. ..How did you 
know?" 

"Dad told me. He thought it 
was pretty funny." 

"He did, huh? Well, there's a 
second example. If your Dad had 
any common sense,. he wouldn't 
have told you about that It's pri- 
vate " 

"Weil,- look at it this way— I'll 
probably never have any com- 
mon sense. It's hereditary." 

I hate it when they're right 
All right— scratch the common 
sense lesson. Try this. 

"Listen — I may not under- 
stand the new math, or why you 
listen to music by bands with 
names like Crows on Crack, but I 
have something better. I 
have... Money And The Car Keys." 

You gotta hit 'em where they 
live. 
Common sense 

When will I get it? 

As soon as you graduate and 
leave home. 

"How will I know I have it?" 

"You'll know because then 
you'll have common sense. 
Without it, you don't even know 
you have it, if you catch my drift." 





Make pumpkin bread lowfat 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Regional Editor . 

Rich pumpkin bread can now be made virtually fat free. 
Simply substitute prune puree for oil or butter as shown in this 
recipe. Prune puree adds moistness and natural sweetness, 
enhancing the vibrant flavor of pumpkin. Cinnamon, cloves, gin- 
ger and nutmeg lend a spicy finish to this satisfying loaf. 

Using canned pumpkin, this quick bread freezes well making 
it easy to keep on hand for fall entertaining or as a gift from the 
kitchen. 

Prune puree can be used In place of butter in brownies, cook- 
ies, cakes and muffins. Use half the amount of prune puree In 
place of the butter called for In the recipe. Process 11/3 cups (8 
ounces) of pitted prunes with 6 tablespoons of hot water in a 
food processor until smooth. Prunes contain vitamin A, iron, 
potassium and fiber. 

Lowfat pumpkin bread 

11/3 cups (8 ounces) pitted prunes 
. 6 This, hot water 
1 cup packed brown sugar 
1 cup granulated sugar 
egg substitute, to equal 4 large eggs 

1 cup (1/2 of one 16-ounce can) pumpkin sauce . 

2 2/3 cups flour 

.2 tsps. baking powder 
1 tsp. each baking soda and cinnamon 
1 12 tsp. each salt and ground cloves 
1/4 tsp. each ground ginger and nutmeg 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine prunes and water in 
container of food process; pulse on and off until prunes are finely 
chopped. In mixer bowl blend prune mixture with sugars. Beat in 
egg substitute and pumpkin just to blend. In bowl combine 
remaining ingredients; add to mixer bowl. Blend thoroughly. 
Spray two 81/2x41/2 inch loaf pan with vegetable cooking 
spray spoon bread mixture into pans, dividing equally. 

Bake 1 hour until pick inserted into center comes out clean. 
Breads can be wrapped tightly in foil and frozen up to one 
month. 

. Makes two loaves. 

Nutritional information per slice: 106 calories; 2g protein; QAg 
fat, 24g carbohydrate; Q.9f fiber, Omg cholesterol; 97 mg sodium. 



\ 



Official Publication 



*•* Notice of Proposed Constitutional amendments *** 

- Pursuant to law public notice is hereby given that the following proposed amendments to the Illinois Constitution will be 
submitted to the Electors of the State of Illinois for adoption or rejection at the General Ejection to be held on November 8, 1994, 
(Proposed changes in the existing constitutional provisions are indicated by underscoring new matter and by striking all matter to be deleted.} 






PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

ARTICLE I. BILL OF RIGHTS • 

SECTIONS. RIGHTS AFTER INDICTMENT 

In criminal prosecutions, the accused shall have the right to appear 
and defend in person and by counsel; to demand the nature and 
cause of the accusation and. have a copy thereof; to be confronted 



with the witnesses against him or her to m ee t th e wim e ss es- fao e -to 



fee* and to have process to compel the attendance of witnesses in his 
or her behalf; and to have a speedy public trial by an impartial jury 
of the county in which the offense is alleged to have been 
committed. 

SCHEDULE 

This Constitutional Amendment takes effect upon approval by the 
electors of this State. 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

ARTICLE IV. THE LEGISLATURE 

SECTION 10. EFFECTIVE DATE OF LAWS 

The General Assembly shall provide by law for a uniform effective 
date for laws passed prior to June Ju ly 1 of a calendar year. The 
General Assembly may provide for a different effective date in any 
law passed prior to June July 1 . A bill passed after May 31 Jwe-30 
shall not become effective prior to Iudc My 1 of die next calendar 
year unless the General Assembly by the vote of three-fifths of the 
members elected to each house provides for an earlier effective date. 

SCHEDULE 
This Constitutional Amendment takes effect upon its approval by the 
electors of this State. 



FORM OF BALLOT 

This proposed amendment to Article I will appear upon the ballot in 
the following form: 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 

SECTION 8 OF ARTICLE I 

(Bill of Rights) 

Explanation of Proposed Amendment 

This proposed amendment changes Article I. Section 8 of the Illinois 
Constitution regarding the rights of the accused in a criminal 
prosecution by replacing language giving the accused the right "to 
meet the witnesses face to face" with language giving the accused 
the right "to be confronted with the witnesses against him or her". 



FORM OF BALLOT 

This proposed amendment to Article IV will appear upon the ballot in 
the following form: 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO 
SECTION 10 OF ARTICLE IV 
(The Legislature) 
EXPLANATION OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT 
This proposed amendment, which takes effect upon approval by the 
voters, amends the Effective Date of Laws section of the 1970 Illinois 
Constitution. This section of the Constitution details when bills shall 
take effect and by what vote they must pass die General Assembly if 
they are to rake effect earlier than scheduled. 
Currently, any bill passed after June 30 cannot take effect before July 
1 of the following year unless the bill passes the legislature by a three- 
fifths vote. The proposed amendment changes the date when the three- 
fifths vote requirement takes effect from July 1 to June 1. As a result 
of this amendment, any bill passed after May 31 will not take effect 
until June 1 of the following year unless the bill passes the legislature 
by a three-fifths vote. 



For the proposed amendment to 
Section 8 of Article 1 - Bill 
of Rights - of the Constitution 



YES 



NO 



For the proposed amendment to 
Section 10 of Article IV - The 
Legislature - of the Constitution 



YES 



NO 



OFFICE OF TBE SECRETARY OF STATE • CAPITOL BUILDING • SFRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

I, GEORGE H. Ryan, Secretary or State of the State of Illinois, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the proposals 
and the forms In which the proposals will appear upon the ballot at the November 8, 1994 General Election pursuant to Senate 
Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment 123 and House Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment 35, of the Eighty-Eighth 
General Assembly, the originals of which are on file in this office. 



In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and affix 
the Great Seal of the State of Illinois, Done In the City 
of Springfield, this U* day of August 1994. 





George H. Ryan 
Secretary of State 



y^C«sw 



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LAKEUFE LaIceM Newspapers; Ocrobtn.7,.19.94. 



Be TLiere 



MoviE Pick 




Freeman steals 'Shawshank' 



Christian Singles plan poMuck dinner 

The Christian Singles group (age 50 and up) Is composed of those who arc 
widowed, divorced, or never married. The group Is non-denominational and 
welcomes visitors and new members anytime. loin the Christian Singles 
Saturday, Oct B at 5:30 p.m. for a pot-luck dinner followed by part one of the 
"Jesus" fill will be shown, part two will be show Oct. 15. For further information 
call 872-2113 or B72-8426. 



MoNcky 



Lighthouse to meet 

The October meeting of Lighthouse, a refuge of hope and safety, will be held 
on Monday, Oct 10 from 730 to 9:30 p.m. at the Village Church of Gurncc, 1319 
N. Hunt Club Rd., Gurncc. "Learning to Feel," a panel will share what methods 
they have found and continue to use to learn how to feel. A short, optional time 
for discussion In small groups will follow the meeting. Lighthouse Is a support 
and educational group for survivors of child sexual abuse. Call Tomor Shirley at 
B72-5389 or Dawn at 578-1370 for further Information. 

Swedish research to be meeting topic 

The Lake County Genealogical Society will meet at the Cook Memorial 
Library, 413 N. Milwaukee Ave., LibertyvUlc on Tuesday, Oct 11 at 7:30 p.m. 
The topic will be "Swedish Research" by Barbara Smallwood. For more infor- 
mation call Joan at 566-1789 or Wanda 1 546-4 154. 

BB/BS orientation meeting set 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Lake County will hold a parent orientation meet- 
ing on Tuesday, Oct 11 at the BB/SS office, 3838 Grand view Ave., Gurnee from 
7 to 9 p.m. Children ages 5 to 14 can benefit from additional weekly adult atten- 
tion of a Big Brother or Big Sister mentor/ role model. Call 360-0770 for an ori- 
entation reservation. . 




Tim Robbira and Morgan Freeman share a lima prison gossip In 
"The Shawshank Redemption." 



Steven Spielberg surprised us 
by doing a movie full of human 
emotion like "Always," after we 



residence In Shawshank Prison. 

We meet, the prison stereo- 
types and our babyfaced hero 



were used to his being a fright endures beatings and gang rapes 




Coping skills seminar planned for Oct. 12 

To help deal with life's ups and downs, the Mental Health DepL at victory 
Memorial Hospital Is presenting a free community seminar, "Coping Skills," 
from 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 12 at the hospital, 1324 N, Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. Mental health nurse David Beaman, R.N., will explain how past per- 
sonal experiences shape the person you arc today. In addition, Beamn will dis- 
cuss the important of "putting things in proper perspective." To register call 
1(800)843-2462. 



doctor in films like his 
"Poltergeist" trilogy. Then he 
became a tragedian with 
"Schindler's List," proving that 
true genius can be kaleidoscopic. 
Residing in that same "multi - 
facet-nation" is another literary, 
ergo film genius named Stephen 



until two things happen, he finds 

out which side a smart jailbird ke .cps *« picture within 



should bring him another 
Academy Award nomination. . 

Robblns does a very passable 
job as the typical prison victim 
who finally wises up and starts 
doing some of the guards' taxes, 
and even gets into some financial 
hanky panky with the warden, 
over the story's 20 year span. 

Since prison walls are still as 
gray 20 years later, the passage of 
time is shown in the changing of 
pin-up pictures from Rita 
Hayworth, to Marilyn Monroe, to 
Rachel Welch. 

Despite it's piercing penal 
premise, and all the usual prison 
characters and scenes, this is 
more an inspirational story of 
survival like "Stand By Me," than 
a tale of simple incarceration and 
its pitfalls. 

Much of this is due to the 
masterful translation of King's 
novella, and edge-walking direc- 
tion, both done by .Frank 
Darabont We are speaking of the 
boundaries between preaching 
and entertainment the director 

He 



butters his bread on, and also 
meets Morgan Freeman, the 
prison "requisitloner" and 
philosopher.. 

Freeman's performance as 



brings us brick and mortar and 
human reality. 

By the end of the movie, we 
have really lived in Shawshank, 
and we really know the people in 
this particular story. We rate it 



King, who has galloped with us Re * f" W who can 8* you 4 .5 out of five stars-by GLORIA 





:•:*:■ :•:-:-:-:-:•:-:■:■:-:- :•>:•:<•:■: -^i * ■ ;■:-:■:■; - :• :■ 

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■.■-■..■■/-* .... 
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I 11,111 I II II II HI hill III [ 



Winning women membership event set 

Business and professional women of Lake County invite all to their Annual 
Winning Women Membership Event on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 6 p.m. at Lilac 
Apartments, 3 Lilac, Fox Lake. Networking and buffet supper begins at 6 p.m., 
program and keynote speakers at 7:30 p.m. Guest speakers wilt be Barbara 
Richardon, Lake County Coro ner and Willard Helander, Lake County Clerk can- 
didate. 



through the gamut of his "tcrror- 
iffic" "'Salem's Lot," to his almost 
spiritual triumphs, on which 
uplifting films such as "Stand By 
Me," and his newest, and one of 
his best, "The Shawshank 
Redemption," are based. 

In "Shawshank," Tim 
Robblns, a banker, who kills his 
wife and her lover in a drunken 
rage, is sentenced to two consec- 
utive life terms and faces all the 
worst things we have heard about 
prisons when he First takes up 



anything you need for a price, DAVIS 



I- ir ir ir r r I* r r Ir IV ir Ir ir \r \r \r r ir r \t . 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 O 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



M.50 all seats all shows 

THE LFTTLE RASCALS (PQ) 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurs. 3:35-5;3S-7:35-rf:35 
Sat. & Sun. 1 :3S-3:35-S:3S-7:3S-9:35 

ANGELS INTHE OUTFIELD (Ml 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurt, 3:05-7: 16 - 
Sat . 8. S u n . 1 :00-3 : 05 -7: 1 S 

BULNKMAN(PG) 

Dally .5:15-9:30 



Month ly Meoiwjs 



Corporate Wlve's club 

A social and support group Is now 
being formed in the Lake County 
area. The purpose of this organization 
will be to help women meet other 
women with similar interests and 
experiences. For details contact 
Donna Kessi ng at 249-0013. 

Mothers of twins 

Lake County Mothers of Twins Gub 
meets the third Thursday of the 
month at Warren Twp. Library. Call 
Robin at 244-7762 for further details. 

Al-Anon 

Al-Anon meets at 7 p.m. eery 
Monday at Peace Lutheran Church, ' 
1050 S. Rand Rd., Lake Zurich. For 
further information call Sandy at 540- 
0601. 

Parent Group 

The Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from 9 to 11 a.m., Thursday in 
Vernon Hills from 7 to 9 p.m. and in 
Zlon on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more Information call 263-7272. 

Divorce support 

A women's divorce support group 
meets twice a month on Wednesday 
evenings. Call Lisa at 680-4106 for 
more information. 

ChlldServ 

The Lake County Business 
Partnership Child Care Initiative Is 
looking for responsible and nurturing 
adults to provide quality Infant and 
toddler care in their home. By becom- 
ing part of this unique partnership 
you can receive many benefits includ- 
. ing: running your own business, 
assistance with child referrals, and 
much more. For more information 
call Dena Thompson at ChlldServ, 
263-2200. -,-■■- 



LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-550-0000 
ROUTE 12 SOUTHEAST OF RT. 22. LAKE ZURICH 

■G 00 ADULTS -'3 OO CHILDREN (Unclor 1 1) 
'3 00 MON -FRI UNTIL 5 PM. SAT & SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 10/7/94 

(THE SPECIALIST *<R) 1i10-3:3S-6:3S-a;50 

1 ONLY YOU (PQ) a-4-«:20-a:30 

| SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION <R) 12:50-3:30-6:10-8:60 

i RIVER WILD (PQ13) 1:4S-4:15-e:4S-a:«S 

| QUIZ SHOW <pai 3> 1 :20-3:50-©:30-0:05 

THE SCOUT (PQ13) 5u. 3:404:15-0:25; M-Tti. 1:30-3:40-0:15-0:25 

TERMINAL VELOCITY (PQ13) 1-3:15-0:40-0:45 

|tIMECOP(R> 1:45-4:15-0:50-0:05 

FORREST OUMP (PQ13) 12:45-3:25-0:05-0 

CLEAR a. PRESENT DANGER <PQ13) 12:50-3:45-0:35-8:16 



SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31. CRYSTAL LAKE 

'5 00 ADULTS • 'D 00 CHILDREN (Undot I t) 
'3 00 MON -FRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT * SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 10/7/94 

1 ONLY YOU (PQ) 1:45-4:05-6:20-8:40 

1:50-4:20-6:30-8:35 

1 2:45-3:25-6:1 O-S : 55 

1 :30-4-6: 25-8 :4S 

2: 1 5-4:30-6:45-0:05 

2:10-4:15-6:50-6:50 

12:30-3:20-6:05-9:00 



1 

a 

■I 



Air Conditioned 
TRUE LIES (R) 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurs. 4:00-6:45-8:20 
Sat. & Sun. 1:00-4:00-6:45-9:20 

THE CLIENT m 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurs. 4:45-7:05-9:35 
Sat. & Sun. 7:05-9:35 

JURASSIC PARK (PQ19) 

Sal, & Sun. Only 1:30-4:35 . ' 



a 
s 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL • 708-855-9940 



THE RIVER WILD (PQ13) 
QUIZ SHOW (PQ13) 
THE SCOUT (PO.13) 
TERMINAL VELOCITY (PQ1 3) 
TIMECOP (R) 
FORREST OUMP (PQ13) 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



TIIIIIIMIIIIIII 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 

SHOWPLACE 8 -26 N. WILLIAMS STREET. CRYSTAL LAKE 
*S™ Adults - l 3'" Child (11 & Under) 815-455-1005 



Sft CU. SPECIAL $250 WEDS & FRI AFTERNOON. BARGAIN MATINEES - ADULTS $4 BEFORE 5:30 
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7 THROUGH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13 


THE SPECIALIST (DTS) 


R 


F-M 12;15-2;35-4:40-7:(»-8:30; TU-TM 4;40-7:Q04:3Q 


RIVER WILD (DTS) 


PG-13 


F-M 12iOO-2:25-4;55-7:SO-9;45: TU-TH 4:55-7:204:45 


ONLY YOU 


PG 


F-M 12:05-1:50-5:10-7:35-9:55; TU-TH 5:10-7:35-5:5$ 


ED WOOD 


R 


F-M 1 :0W:1<W:4M:1Q: TU-TH 4:104:404:10 


QUIZ SHOW 
(HO PASSES) 


PG-13 


F-M 12:104:00-6:50-9:40; TU-TH 4:004:504:40 


TIMECOP 


R 


F-M 12:45-3:004:15-7:304:50; TU-TH 5:15-7:304:50 


FORREST GUMP 


PG-13 


F-M 12;50-3:454;454:35; TU-TH 4:004:454:35 


TERMINAL VELOCITY 


PG-13 


F-M 12:30-2:4W:55-7:15-9:25; TU-TH 4;55-7:tS4:25 


CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER 


PG-13 


F-M 1:1CM:06-7;06-10:00; F-TH 4,06.7:05-10:00 


THE SCOUT 


PG-13 


F-SU 12:154:50-9:15; M-TH 4:504:15 


J IN THE ARMY NOW 

■v^ 


PQ 


F-M 2:40-7:40; TU-TH 7:40 

1 — ijl 




Onuonw 



CiNEpUx OdeoN Theatres 



JUVERTREE^eOtJRTi 



'.■>: . - .■-:■;•. ■-•. 



Ed Wood (R) (Dolby) 
2:00-4 35-7:05-9:40 



THE SPECIALIST <R) 



Fri, Mea-Thun. MM; S it * Sun. MWJM4M 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 378 LAKE ST.. ANTIOCH 
395-02 1G 



»4" ADULTS «2" CHILD (114 UNDER) «Z" UNTIL 5 P.M. 
RIVER WILD (PG13) Fri. «:454; Oil. ■ Sun. 2:15-4:304:454; Mon.-Tliuri. t:454 I 



LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 -708 N. MILWAUKEE. LIBERTYVILLE 

362-3011 



•4.00 Adults - ^.(JO Child (1 1 & Under). Sat., Sun. & Mon. First Afternoon Show 
IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU (PQ) F %toT£2"mS£5S!« 

TERMINAL VELOCITY (PG13) FrMusi-Tliun. 6:454; &aL,Sun.*Mon,e:454 
ANDRE (R) ' - 8M„Sun.» Mon. 2:15-4:30 



McHENRY 1 & 2 - 214 GREEN ST.. McHENRY 
(815)385-0144 



•4,00 Adults - '2.00 Child (1 1 & Under) Bargain Mallnee Until 5:00 p.m. 

CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER <R) s*AsftSJ<K« 

NATURAL BORN KILLERS (R) Frl.Msa.Thn. •:»«; M. lit*. 1*4*1*4 

TIM TIM I1I1I1 



Quiz Show (PG-13) (Dolby) 
1:30-4:15-7:10-10:00 



Ttte River Wild (PG-13) (Stereo) 

12:45-3:00-5:15-730-9:45 



Tfie Shaxvshank Redemption (R) (Dolby) (on 2 screens) 

1:00-230-4:00-5:30-7:00-830-10:00; Fri, Tue-Thr 7:00-8:30-1 0:00 



Clear and Present Danger (PG-13) (stereo) 

Sun-Mon 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00; Fri, Tue-Thr 7:00-10:00; Sat 1:00-4:00-10:00 



Love Affair (PG-13) Sneak Preview Sat. 7.-00 



Forrest Gump (PG-13) (Dolby) 
1:00-4:00-6:50-9:50 



Only YOU (PG-13) (Dolby) 

1:00-3:05-5:10-7:20-9:25 



HAWIMORNeEN^E^ 



The Specialist (R) (on 2 screens) 

1:00-3:15-530-7:45-10:00 



Time Cop (R) (Dolby) 

1:20-3:30-5 :30-7:30.9:30 



Natural Born Killers (R) (Dolby) 

4:15-9:30; Fri, Tue-Thr 930 



Tfte Scout (PG-13) (Dolby) 
2:00-7:00; Fri, Tue-Thr 7:00 







■ 



OcTobe* 7? 1 ??4 ' LaWiM NewspApE^ tAKELIFE 





i 
i 
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ACROSS 

1 Ernst's art 
5 Saloons 
9 "Hail, fellow, 
wcli-- 

12 Yoked bcasls 

13 Tennis great 
Arthur — 

14 Zsa Zsa's 
sister 

15 "Mad Max" 
star • 

17 Backtalk 

18 Queen. of 

* mysteries 

19 Ping-pong 
need 

21 French article 

22 Minuscule 
24 Tibetan monk 

27 Dined ' 

28 Behind 
schedule 

31 Pastoral poem 

32 Lapidary 
concent 

33 Thumbs-down 
vote " 

34 Lifeline site 
36Yoko- 

37 Lot unit 

38 Dance 

40 Do precede r 

41 Plant life 
43 Eye part 

47 Oxygen: prefix 

48 "The Producers 

• director 

51 Aries 

52 Historic canal 

53 Exploits 





54 Mine output 

55 Cassandra 

56 Pan of SAT 
DOWN 

1 Rotunda top 

2 Skating turn 

3 Valley 

4 — Lansbury 

5 Newborn 

6 Ninny 

7 Greek letter 



16I : ur> 

20 The works 

22 Shorthand 
taker. 

23 Reminder 

24 Chop off 

25 Nabokov novel 



40 Craggy 

4 1 Casino game 

42 Mad king of 
drama 

43 Truck radio 
user 

44 Schuozz 



26 The "Velvet Fog" 45 — out 

27 Exceptionally 46 Helper: abbr. 



eager 
29 Prepare to 
feather 



49 Before 

50 Tall talc 



8 Actress Bcrger ^ q % \ z 

9 Bugs Bunny'- 



- voice 

10 Demonic 

1 1 VCR need 



35 Impair 

37 Lei a breeze 

into 
39 Titles 



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9 ■ • •** * 
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ARIES (March 21 lo April 19) ^ 
Business interests run smoothly but 
a financial matter may concern you 
this. week. You may find com- 
munieating with family members * 
difficult early in the week. Try to 
make amends by week's end. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
You may be struck with a sudden 
urge to travel somewhere you've 
never been before. Meeting close as- 
sociates halfway is important this t 
week. For the weekend, social inter- ^ 
csts aren't especially favored. 

GEMINI (May 2 1 to June 20) You 
work best this week from behind the 
scenes.' Because of this, it's not the 
best time for presenting your ideas to 
. superiors on the job. Minor differen- 
ces in outlook with loved ones arc M 
likely, it 

CANCER (June 21 tn July 22) A 
partner has an unusual suggestion 
that may not ap|K*al to you at first. 
However, upon further reflection, 
you just may begin to see its merits. 
A particular friend isn't much fun to 
be with this week, so avoid that per- k^ 

son: * *Ar± 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) An v 
innovative approach gives you the 
answers you seek in business. Con- 
cern about a money situation may 
dampen your mood for socializing. 
Follow your instincts. A weekend at * 
home isn't a bad idea right now. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) An offbeat entertainment will 
prove enjoyable, although you may 
have your doubts about it at the 
onset. A work problem left over from 
last week still concerns you. How- 
ever, by week's end, all will be 
worked out satisfactorily. *> 

LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) Problems relating to work may . ^ 
still be on your mind during the eve- 



, • mm, 

ning hours and on the wcekendTV 
However, ovoid a tendency to brood „ 
and snap at family, members' as a 
result. Be leery of those who would . 
take advantage financially. ^ 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 

November 21) Being set in your 
Ways could work against reaching 
agreements with others. Instead, be 
open to new ideas and examine each ^f> 
one objectively. Extra duties or ex- 
penses may arise in connection with 
a home matter. it ■ 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 lo 
Deceml>er 21) Things move right 
along in business in the beginning of 
lhe\veek. Later on, though, you may 
encounter some minor, irritating-. 
snags. Family members won't be in , 
agreement (his week concerning a 
domestic situation. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) You'll need more time 
to decide how best to handle a dif- 
ficult work situation. Someone close 
to you has the answers if you'll just' 
reach out to this person. An enter- 
tainment will be more fun this 
weekend without. a certain pesty 
friend. * , 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to * 
February 18) Time alone this week 
will allow you to sort out your con- 
fusing thoughts about a romantic in- 
terest. Because of this 
preoccupation, you may have too 
much on your mind to feel totally at 
ease in a social situation. 

PISCES (February 19 to March 
20) You'll be surprised .and 
delighted to hear from a friend you 
haven't seen in a while. Along with 
this comes good news. The end of the 
week will find you in an introspec- 
tive mood. Be careful not to shut out 
close tics. "fc w 






OIKM ky King Feature* Synd. 



Ryerson Woods exhibits 'Next Door Nature* -(3|asS REUNIONS 



"Next Door Nature," an exhlb 
it of nature photography by 
Arlington Heights photographer 
Cliff Zenor, opened this week at 
the Ryerson Conservations Area 
of the Lake County Forest 
Preserves. • 

Featuring more than two 
dozen images of natural area, 
plants, and wildlife, the exhibit 
shows that we need look no fur- 
ther than our own backyards to 
find interesting nature. 

The photographs in "Next 
Door Nature" were taken on loca- 
tion at Forest Preserves and parks 
in northern Illinois and 
Wisconsin,, including Ryerson 
Woods, Volo Bog, and Illinois, 
Beach State Park. Zenor tries to 
show that to appreciate the 
diverse places around us, . we 



Ten free trees available 

Ten free shade trees will be 
given to each person who joins 
the National Arbor Day 
Foundation during October. 

The free trees are part of the 
nonprofit Foundation's Trees for 
America campaign. 

The 10 shade trees are sugar 
maple, red oak, pin oak, green 
ash, thornless honeylocust, 
weeping willow, river birch, tulip- 
tree, silver maple, and red maple. 

The trees will be shipped 
postpaid at the right time for 
planting between Nov. 1 and Dec. 
10 with enclosed planting 
instructions. The six to 12 inch 
trees are guaranteed to grow, or 
they will be replaced free of 
charge. 

To become a member of the 
Foundation send $10 member- 
ship contribution to Shade Trees, 
National Arbor Day Foundation, 
100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 
68410, by Oct, 31. 



must slow down and look close: 
up. 

For those who believe the best 
and brightest that nature has to 
offer are in far-off places like 
Yellowstone orYosemite, the pho- 
tographs in the exhibit will show 
that interesting plants and ani- 
mals are all around us. 

Zenor learned photography 
through practical experiences, 
rather than in a classroom. He 
studied horticulture at the Univ. 
of Wisconsin-Madison, and 
taught at the Chicago Botanic 
Garden before becoming a full- 
time photographer. He is current- 
ly shooting "Houseplants," a book 
for Knopf Publishers. 

Ryerson Woods is located on 
Riverwoods Road, just south of 
Half Day Road (Rte. 22), and west 
of 1-94 toll way, near Deerfield. 

The Visitors Center is open 
seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Call 948-7750 for more 
information. 



Grant Community High 
School Class of 1984 is planning 
their 10 year reunion. Contact 
Michelle Runnion at 587-5911 for 
details. 

Marshall High School's 
January and June classes of 1954 
will hold a 40th reunion on 
Saturday, Nov. 5 at the Radisson 
Suites O'Hare. Call Joel Mosak at 
948-1255 or Ron Weis at 291-1044 
for information. 

Alumni Systems, Inc. is 

currently seeking alumni for the 
following classes: 

Antioch Class of 1984, Oct 15 
at Andre's Steak House, 
Richmond; 

For more information call 
Alumni Systems, Inc. at (815)477- 
0858. 

Taylor Reunion Services 
is seeking alumni for the follow- 
ing classes: 

Highland Park. High School 
Class of 1984, Nov. 26 at Bub City, 
Chicago; 

Lake Forest High School 
Class of 1984 is looking for alum- 
ni for their 10 year reunion to be 



held in 1994. 

Libertyville High Class of 
1984 is looking for alumni for 
their 10 year reunion to be held in 
1994. 

Buffalo Grove High School 
Class of 1985 is looking for alum- 
ni for their 10 year reunion to be 
held July 22, 1995 at Seasons of 
Long Grove. 

Deerfield High School Class 
of 1975 and Class of 1985 are 
looking for alumni for their 
reunions to be held in 1995. 

Elk Grove High School Class 



of 1985 is looking for alumni for 
their 10 year reunion to be held in 
1995. 

For further information call 
Taylor Reunion Services at 1-800- 
677-7800. 

Class Reunion Inc. 

For reunion information for 
the following schools contact 
Class Reunion Inc. at 677-4949: 

Evanston High School Class 
of 1944 50th reunion on Saturday, 
Oct 15 the Sunset Ridge Country 
Club in Northbrook. 



What Stories Did The Stars Write For You? 

Custom Astrological Profiles based on the time, date and location of birth 
Find out how special you really are! Career 
Profiles, Child. Relationship, Natal/Birth 
and Morel 

GREAT OFT IDEA! 

For FREE brochure Send Now! 

Sterlor Enterprises 

P.O. Box 455 Dept. LN 

Antioch, IL 60002 




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Where To 
Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 
WEEK 



Sail Luis offers authentic 
Mexican fare, atmosphere 

When you're in the mood for good food, visit San 
Luis Restaurant at 50 S, Grccn-bay Rd. In Waukcgan, 
Tills family owned and operated restaurant has been in 
the Waukcgan community since 1982, moving from 
Kenosha. 

The family takes great pride in the fact that 

they offer great food, excellent 

service, and a 




5.1 



-J 




San Luis 



wif Ki'^ttiuninl c* /'. 



Fafhas, Combination Dinners, 
Chtmkhangas, Tacos 



LIVE MARIACHI 

Every Friday Night 



■Buy One Entree, Gel Second J 
1/2 Off or Fourth OnefSff! f 



I 



I 



I Mniiig Mone? 

L"gvc o dfwk on ftoe bof sc with entree. 
Hew pmtnt toupan. Dot ptr bblt. lot nlid on bulfct. lime or Iciitr iikt. 



(OMPUMENf ARY MARGARITA 

Open 11 a.m-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m. to 1 a.m Fri. & Sat 



50 S. Green Bay Rd. - Waukegan 

(Green Bar Rd. & Washington St.) 



244-3636 




casual, 

relaxing atmosphere for 

their customers. Everything is fresh and 

homemade by the owners themselves. 

The menu at San Luis contains many Mexican 
favorites, including Chimichangas, Enchilada Suiza, 
"Uistcc San Luis" (rib-eye steak), and a special dish 
called "Parrillada" that feeds, four and includes a T- 
bonc, pork chops, skirt steak, and chicken with bell 
peppers, onions, tomatoes, and a special Mexican 
sausage on top. Traditional American fare is 
available, too, along with breakfast and a kids menu 
that features all entrees under $5. Adult entrees range 
from $5 to $30 per person. San Luis also offers an all- 
you-can-cat buffet from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily for 
only $4.95. 

San Luis 
can accom- 
modate pri- 
vate parties 
up to 50 
people in a 
separate 
section of the 
restaurant. 
They request 
that you call 
in advance for 
any parties 
over eight 
people, in order to make preparations ahead of time. 

Visit San Luis on Fridays and you'll get a special 
treat. .an authentic Mariachi band appears at 8 p.m. for 
your entertainment. Hours arc Sunday thrqugh 
Thursday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m, and Friday and Saturday 
1 1 a.m. to 1 a.m. You can call San Luis at 244-3636. 




~\\ 



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doing W$\mkmft\ 
M*nd$togoto 

) 



<^i 



"Fb/SlfU/til/ 
for Sundtr Brunch or\ 
tlBFHd»yFl*hFry?[ 



Out W—kmnd Biunch 

Or Oinnw Buffmt 

Fmalurmt Ovmr 80 Food 

ttmmal 

Sauday Cncmpogno Bruncn 

llan-230pm 
Soiiiday Omar Buflei 

2-30pfn-',0pfri 
reoKHro Roosl Duck . . . .V.50 



A Sunday Famity 

Tradtlton Sunday 

Chompagnm Biunctt 

lDcm-230pm 

Sunday Dmcr Buffet 

?.30pm-9pm 

f eahilrvo Pak I tin & Jukoy 

w/&«jfng ....•fc&O 



Join Ut Frlnday 

Nil m... in Man Than 

JuMtAFHhfry. 

Ova 80 Ifemj Fcalu Ing Youf 
Favailo Wi £nlo« 

4pm-IOpm ....'7.50 

Ealy »d SdccW 4-5 pm ,«W0 



1 760 H, Milwaukee 
Libertyville, IL 
Call 361-8101 



GRILLED CHICKEN 
FETTUCCINI 

Strips of grilled chicken 

tenders saulood with 

trash broccoli, garlic, 

scolllons and tresh 

romano choose *S.99 



BEST BUFFALO 
WINGS 

Our original rocelpel 
Served w'rth carrots, 
calory & blue choose 

dressing. Hot or 
Screaming! '3.99 



/'/. i\ yoi it n< nm wv utn ii //'// 1 st 



C3 VV^f^tfe 

UP POUSH AMERICAN BUFFET 



LrNoodles 





lldkm American Dining 



Previously Red Noodle 



On Route 83, Just North of Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 

223-7010 



Wednesday Night 

Italian 
Buffet 

5:00-8:30 p.m. 

Featuring 

Homemade 

Italian 

Specials 




^T 




Waterfalls 

|/ Restaurant • Banquets • Lounge • Dance Club 

f 24436 W. Rt. 173 • Antloch, IL 60002 
708-395-2212 



Jlnner Entrees 
Stirling At *5.9S 




SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH 

tO AM-2 W 

Enjoy After Dinner Drinks In Only *8 J 5 
B*f». Our Lounge Wiib Music From *0,95CNId 
tbe60 , s,7Ps,80<s,&m »1.M Htfehilr. 





CLOSED MONDAYS 



Daily 
Dinner Specials 



SERVED TUESDAY - SUNDAY (Except Saturdays) 

October 11-16 ■" „ 

Baked Lasagnu .'■ ...;.„... jr»ZrJ 

Chicken. Breust Kabob 10.95 

Filet of Sole Parmigiana • JL JL»VD 

AVcincr Schnitzel X'^imjrJ"' 

BBQ. Ribs 13«95 

Inducts Our Uiy Sum Relish Trey. S»l»d. Polilo. Vendible, Bevcnge & Deism. 
Casmt attire, moderately priced, by reservation, charge cardt accepted 

m,,e (Eairairg Squirt 

^Restaurant Sc JBnnxjitet ^Jfncili ties 
Gracio us dining In the Wesley Start Country Ejlale 

RLs. 120 & 45 - Gruyslukc • (708) 223-0121 
Your Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas 







Closed 
Monday 



217 NO ROUTE 31. McHENRY (1 MILE SO OFRTE 120; * (815) 344-0330 



YAN'S HUNAN INN 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 



4 Best Steaks and Pastas 

Watch The Bears and Play OBI Here 

I Karaoke • Club fcaticflnd • C & w 
I Dancing • Restaurant • Banquets 

1 Come for the Food and Stay for the Fun! 



DAKOTA 
ROSl 



BestUtt |e 




in Kenosnai 

SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIAL 

Dry Rubbed $ 4 *% 95 

Cajun Style Ribeye ............. 1 O 

Roast Prime Rib .*1 3 95 



SUNDAY SPECIAL 



BBQ Pork Ribs 
Full Rack 



■ yptpveap: rsTrw^ 



Half Rack 

8040 Sheridan Road 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 

Ph- 414-654-7500 



$ 14 95 
I $ 9 95 



T, Wad, Th 3:30-1 Op 

Fri & Sat 3:30-1 0:30p 

Sun. Noon-9:30p 

Closed Mon. 




SERVING IWCH 6 DINNER | 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Wednesdays & Fridays 



) 



I HON, MilwiUiki'i'Avi' 



OPEN 
I DAYS 



fill Likelmrsl KiKicI, 



7(ia;ini> ii i ma 



I . 1 1 1 > Dill Sj»» 



Wutiki^iin, II 




Open > 

AY EVENING 
fOR DINNER! 

4:30 to 8:30 p.m. 



iiinmniiiiiiitititTT i 



Fish Fry •Fresh Sqlad Bar 
• Delicious Steaks • Bar-B-Q Ribs 
'• Pasta A Morel 





COUNTRY 

(llam.-2:30p.m.) RESTAURANT 
Bakery • Country Store • Orchard * Greenhouse 

300 S. lite. 83 (1/4 Mi. N. of Midlothian ltd.) Mundelein, IL (708) 5664520 



|1300! 



IQpdn Tlwi. Through Sun. 



FROM THE OWNERS OF BLUE BAY RESTAURANT 



Qrand tPaCace 



"WE SPECIALIZE IN CONTINENTAL CUISINE" 

PgBTITEgTnrTTmTl 



! VOL II HOLIDAY I'AMY? 



^ 



H \HE \0\\ 
i utst ( 



i MM.H 



Full Menu • Plus Daily Specials 
5572 WEST GRAND AVE. GURNEE 
(70B)-6tta-2929 F AX (708) 602^099 . 
111111 II Il illl l M llfl + l 



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OcTobtaJ, 1?»4 I 



s*i m •* * I 



N EWV? « 1 UMUFE. 




Restaurant is the place to be on Fridays WHERE To 





Got a taste for seafood? Don't miss the "Fish Feast" at 
Parkway Restaurant on Bclviderc Road In WestWaukcgan! 

The "Fish Feast" features fresh Lake Perch and broiled 
fresh Lake Superior Whitcflsh 
entrees for only $11.95 each; 
You'll also want to try the Boston 
Clam Chowder and watch for the 
succulent Seafood Bisque that 
usually appears on the menu 
every four weeks. This spicy 
Bisque is made with a lobster 
base and crab meat. Other 
features include Baked Salmon 
with hollandalsc sauce, and 
"Oysters Lorenzo Y which 
consists of fried baked oysters on 
the half-shell topped with a creamy mushroom sauce 
doused with crab flakes and parmesan cheese sprinkled 
on top. Owner Peter Paulson is also proud of the Shrimp 
dc Jonghe casserole with just the right amount of garlic. 
Paulson said, "When that dish is served, the tantalizing 
aroma permeates the restaurant and drives everyone 
wild.. .nobody makes Shrimp dc Jonghe like we do!" 

Don't get the Idea that Parkway only serves 
seafood.. .they're also famous for their beef selections, 
such as prime rib of beef, Parkway Filet, and 16-ouncc 
strip steak, among others. Choose from a petite cut of 
prime rib for only $14.95. The regular cut is a bargain at 
$16.95. Paulson noted. that one of the more popular items 
is the fresh braised lamb shanks for $11.95, and also their 
delicious BBQ baby back ribs. For dessert, Parkway offers 
their famous "Red Layer Cake", a multi-layered devil's 
food concoction, and a variety of homemade pics. 

Parkway is a 50 year family-run business, with second- 
generation owner Peter Paulson getting help from his wife 
and son, Martin. Paulson stated that people that come to 
Parkway are secure in the fact that the restaurant has been 
able to maintain a professional staff with minimal 
turnover through the years, lie said Parkway is in a great 
location for. northern Lake County and has. been the site 
for many lucrative business luncheons 
As Parkway likes to say 
"If your 



lunch Is important, you should be having it at Parkway! " 
Keep Parkway in mind for your special function. They 

have three separate dining rooms, each with their own 

individual bar, that can 
accommodate 20 to 90 people for 
family reunions, rehearsal dinners, 
retirement parties, business 
seminars, or holiday gatherings. 
Paulson said "it's never too early to 
book your event", so give them a 
call for scheduling and pricing 
information. 

Parkway, is open for lunch 
Tuesday through Friday, and is open 
every day for dinner at 4 p.m. You 
can reach Parkway at 366-0222. 



i>»V 



SATURDAY 

SENIOR 

DINNER HOUR 




Enjoy reduced cocktail and 

dinner prices this Saturday 

between 4:00-6:00. 

Senior dinner specials will 

include soup, salad, potato, 

vegetable, beverage, and 

sherbet for only 8.95. For 

reservations, call 336-0222. 

Sorry, dinner coupons will not 
be honored with this special. 




Eat Out 



FEATURE 

OF THE 
WEEK 




mM^pteW^z?-^'- "' - - - : - ■ ■ - ■•-•■• -.' .■: : r' j rm 

^Saturday, Oct. 15th 

Dinner-Dance 
featuring 
■I " Armand Rossi Trio" 

P . . 7-11 p.m. 

in the Rosewood Room 

In addition to our regular menu, our 
specials will include: 

•Braised Fresh lamb Shanks .1M5 M 

f&k : ; •Crisp? Roast Duck, cranberry sauce .*15.95 ffi 

Wih' •Baked Atlantic Salmon, hollandaise . , *15.95 m 

fe& ■•Surf&Turf ; '^ /IS 

|fj§t Reservations Please 
IWfe^ 336-0222 



I 



K- 






i 



ERRY" 



Voted #1 

Mexican 

Restaurant 



Rtantfr. ihtmun larfan of WIIH Ntwtndio 71. 
reviewed Terr/'i, vtrnt them an excellent T mint 
16 out «f 20, which wu umunted on the radio 
Septenher >. " 



Innovative 
Gourmet Tex'Mex 

Cuisine 



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L« 



DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS 

Join Us MoN<ky NiqhTS In The LouNqc! 

Come on all you football widows, join us Monday nights 
fn the lounge starting al 5 P.M. You don't have to watch 
the football game or suffer at home listening to cheers or 
groans. Treat yourself to All You Can Eat Linguini 
Mexicana and a Lite beer by the glass or pitcher. Be sure 
to bring a friend, a smile, and an appetite. Kick back and 
enjoy. Adults only. 

PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE! 
•No SwokiNq Area •HANdoppEd AccksiWe 

TERRY' C 
MEXICAN** 
RESTAURANT 



■fJirw 



729 N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 

(IN THE HAWLEY COMMONS) CARRV-OUT 
HOURS: MONVFRT 1 1 AM-10 PM 
SATURDAY 12 NOON - 10 m CLOSED SUNDAY 



5669510 



GREAT ALL-AMERICAN 
FOOD & FUN 



mi: 
VILLAGE 
TAVERN 




The Village Tavern 



All You Can Eat Specials 

Served From 5 to 10 PM 

Tuesdays. 

Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes & Vegetables 
$6.50 ____ 

Wednesdays 

Chicken, French Fries & Coleslaw 
' $6,25 

Thursdays 

BBQ Beef Ribs & French Fries 
$6.95 

Fridays 

Our Famous Fish Fry All Day 
With French Fries & Coleslaw 

All Served With Homemade Bread 

Whether you're on your own, with a date, family or 
friends, The Village Tavern is always a great tlmel 

There's Always Fun & Entertainment 

Old McHenxy Road in Long Grove 

(708) 634-3117 

All major credit cards accepted. 



tensenHou^ e 

RESTAURANT 

OKTOBERFEST 

September 28 - October 1 6 

Serving Authentic German Entrees and Desserts 

Weiner Schnitzel .......$10.25 

WrthSpatde 

Schlacht Platte ...$9.95 

(Kssseter fllbchen, Veal Brat, German Sausage) 

Rouladen ....$9.45 

With Red Cabbage 

Roast Duck ..................$9.95 

With Bread Dumpling 

Sauerbraten $9.25 

Witi Potato Pancake 

Poached Flounder .................$10.95 

With White DiO Sauce, Boiled German Potatoes, 
German Style Green Beans 

Hasenpfeffer. $9.25 

Wilt Spat* 

Smoked Pigs Feet ...................$8.95 

Win Sauerkraut, Choice of Potato 
i (All Entrees Include: Soup and salad, choice of Sauerkraut or 
Red Cabbage. Pttaumen Kuerten or German Chocolate Cake ) 
| EntertalnmenlprovtoedbyEdKlahoriaccorettan 1 

Regular Menu Also Available" 

B0UET0 
POAJLMODUW, ODDOCJENSEHESTA^SEOONlEROFnTLmil} 

we how accept ^ 708-395-6474 

*^ ^^ **i#* BrwtfBtu3!*l*alT«ei.6invaj(nc 
MWrawn K 1 ^ Breast 1 Lunch iDiinerWel thru Sun. 6 »nv9c 



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LAKEUFE UkriANd NewspA^RS OcTob» 7 r -1994 ity i 



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Corn pone, glitz good mix in 





Mary Kato McGfath and Mark Brink In "Tho Will Roger's Follies. 



In the face of many boring 
musical revivals, the Candlelight 
Dinner Playhouse in Summit has 
gone up a level by bringing its 
audiences a Broadway hit hardly 
cold from the Tony Awards cere- 
mony where it walked away with 
a herd of those coveted statues. 

This in-thc-round version of 
the slam bang, toe tapping, glit- 
tering bit of country, "The Will 
Rogers Follies;" Is based on the 
life of a true American legend, 
humorist and philosopher. 

Corny at times,' "Rogers," Is 
full of the kind of delicious ker- 
nels they still sell at the county 
fair, only this one's buttered with 
glitzy follies 1 gold. 

* Although the opening num- 
ber, filled with curvaceous cow- 
girls, dancing cowboys, and tap 
dancing buxom cows, is a fast- 
paced knee slapper, the appear- 
ance of Rogers gets the show off 
to a slow, laid back start, befitting 
our hero's style. 

But the plot builds in leaps 
and bounds with one great musi- 
cal number after another embell- 
ishing the love story of Betty and 
Will Rogers. 

Interestingly different is the 
extravagant wedding finale of Act 
I, in which the entire cast shines. 
The unusually moving show 



finale explains this early big 
splash. 

Producer, director, William 
Pulinskl outdoes all recent 
Candlelight productions with this 
one by utilizing the top-notch 
choreography of Danny Herman 
that produces mlni-Zicgfcld-likc 
production numbers which 
should bring audiences to their 
feet. 

In the same sparkling vein arc 
the outstanding costume designs 
of Burt Pilchcr, especially in the 
"Presents For Mrs, Rogers" num^ 
bcr. 

. Mark Brink is perfect as the 
philosophizing, rope twirling 
cowboy, who. sowed so many 
pearls of verbal wisdom in the 
center of Ziegfeld's gawdy girlie 
shows. 

His stature is imposing in a 
non-imposing way. His apolo- 
getic verbal orations belong to 
Rogers himself, and he docs well 
in the love song department, 
although his hat holding version 
of the best song in the show, the 
inspiring, "I Never Met a Man I 
Didn't Like," is a show stopper. 

Mary Kate McGrath displays a 
strong- voice, and an even 
stronger character as Rogers' wife 
who lives in his gigantic shadow, 
winding her life around his. Her 



saga 



piano-sitting torch song; "No 
Man For Me," Is a standout 
among many standouts. 

Robert Torri as Rogers live, 
but mostly dead father; brings 
just the right amount of humor, 
sprinkled with a little pathos here 
and there, to the stage. 

• Candlelight's singing and 
dancing companies are always 
brimming with talent, but this 
has to be one of the best tcrpsi- 
chorcan collections yet! Jill 
Locnikar's Ziegfeld's favorite 
chorus girl Is a standout physical- 
ly, but mostly because of her bub- 
bly enthusiasm. 

It's fun to be reminded of 
Rogers' wisdom, especially when 
he lets the audience know that 
there's really nothing new under 
the sun, and people arc just that, 
plain people, wherever you go. 
- As usual; Candlelight's 
hydraulic stage is one of the stars 
of the show, giving it. a third 
dimension, as are the changing 
pictures inside of the golden lari- 
ats that surround the stage. 

Here's one for the entire fam- 
ily, a musical lesson in living life 
to Its fullest with a song filling 
one's heart, a plot as corny as can 
be, but still as wonderful as it will 
always remain. — by GLORIA 
DAVIS 



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[Rcjtiurent ft Lounge I 
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Now 

Serving Dinner 

4 p.m. - Fii, Sat, Sun. 



Fri., Sat, Sun. 

PRIME RIB SPECUU. 

IP Special Cut 1 I 



Raj. Oil 




Sunday • Champagne Brunch 

10a,m.-2p.m. 

Addb 8 Kids 4 

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 

Fri. & Sat. Nile In Our Lounge 

Call (708) 395-4800 

40150 N. Rio. 59, Antioch, Open 1o I he Public 




Dairq 
Queen 



© 



DAIRY QUEEN OF 
ANTIOCH 

DQ SOFT SERVE ITEMS* 
YOGURT -HOT FOOD 
— HARD ICECREAM -NOVELTIES • 

hm^tar SOFT DRINKS - CAKES, 

I//IM#Cf/ PIES AND LOGS 

Customer 
Appreciation Sale 

All Menu Items 1/2 Price 
Sat. & Sun. - Oct. 15 & 16 



Closing Oct. 16 




We'd Like To Thank Our Loyal 
Customers For Another Successful Year 

966 Main St., Antioch 
395-8383 



Sit You 
in?d>. 



SmYou 



RESTAURANT 
LOUNGE 



Ea&^ 




.■ 



OPEN DAILY 
10*00 AW 

Sit-* Son. Opt* 7 km: 
INTERSECTION HWY. 41: 
- *157 (BUCKLEY RDJLS 

-Phone 689-9062 



";•■?-, 



Now Serving Breakfast Saturday 7:00 &rtu 



Huge Lunch Buffet Mori. -Fri, 1 1 am-3 pm 

Sunday Brunch - Large Selection 

LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS, CHILDREN'S MENU AVAILABLE 



■jf-rH-t:?^; 



GREAT FOOD - REASONABLE. PRICES - 

NICE ATMOSPHERE 

Steaks, Prime Rib, Hickory Smoked BBQ Specials, 
Lobster, Crab Legs, Seafood, Sandwiches 



Trfat Your Family Am Your Friends Rjcirn Bring Them Tot 

WbBMa!'JS[ agans 



THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 






itS* 










"Uteattdln beautiful downtown Gtlmir" 

438-0300 

FRIDAY BESTKW 

FISH FRY "A FAMILY IN TOWN 

RESTAURANT" 

OPEN7DAYS 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices 




m 



GilmerA Midlothian Roads • Mundelein, Illinois 60060 






I£K»m 



far 20-500 

9 Special Events 
* ffleetittp Places 
* //al/ao? Parties 
9 Bos/Bat fift'tamis 
9 uamPaxtf rtutctions 

. at 

War Hosts Robert & Taitfpa ii/eklt cordially 

. inH'te pea to plan alitor special tvt«te at the 

.North Short notel/^foraMe 

For iitfrrmatioK call; 

708/433-6566 

roofllJUriioLHRd^fffkusoi 



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Lakeland 

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P/ioto courtsey of Crane's Photography, 



, r*ST*.'i ; .".*SS" *yt^i3a>;yia 



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Long Grove 






A brief look at modern-day 
wedding trends 



A big, traditional family wedding 
celebration with al the trlmmlngs...Most 
engaged couples stll long for this 'fairy 
tale" setting, but In the cautious 1990s, 
they're planning with a close eye on 
the budget. Value for the dollar Is of 
paramount importance for every pur- 
chase made or service hired, as more 
couples finance the majority of their 
weddings themselves— even If it means 
extending their engagement period to 
give them time to save. Watch for more 
weddings at off-peak hours. 

Here's a look at the leading trends In 
weddings, fashions, honeymoons and 
home: 
The wedding 

•Couples cut the cake with a ster- 
ling silver 'Heritage Knife" engraved 
with both their, parents' and their own 
Initials. The knife becomes a family heir- 
loom, to be passed down to the cou- 
ples' child arid his/her spouse."' 

•Couples fill' traditional wedding- 
party roles with best friends, regardless 
of gender 0- ©■ A "man of honor" re- 
places a "maid of honor;* the "best 
man" may be a woman). 

•Ethnic and cultural Influences are 
Incorporated into the celebration, from 
a Joyful bagpipe serenade at an Irish 
reception to a "dollar-a-dance" with 
the bride at a Polish wedding. 
A celebration to remember 

•Themed and personalized wed- 
dings reflect the couple's personality. 
Renaissance-style celebrations, moun- 
talntop nuptials; weddings "per- 
formed" on skis or skates commemo- 
rate how the couple met. 

•Food trends feature "dinner by the 
bite"— an assortment of passed hors 
■d'oeuvres— and "grazing stations" with 
seats near each buffet to allow guests 
to change places of each course and 
mingle with other guests. Fewer cours- 
es, lighter selections (such as chicken, 
pastas, fish) are budget and health 
conscious. 



•Innovative entertainment Is spot- 
lighted at the reception In the form of a 
toastmaster, comedian, magician to 
amuse and involve guests; the specta- 
cle of a laser or fireworks display heralds 
the new marriage. 
Fashion 

•Choice, individuality and value are 
this season's watchwords, as designers 
create a silhouette for every figure— 
and price point. The newest notion: 
unadorned designs with choose-your- 
own embellishments. More fashions 
trends to note: 

•Classic gown shapes (A-llnes, 
draped or fitted empires, hourglass) are 
punctuated with romantic detailing. 
Deep decollete necklines offer an al- 
ternative to off-the-shoulder styles. For 
less' formal nuptials, evening wear Is 
reinterpreted and Just about any length 
Is appropriate, Including the unex- 
pected combination of long sJdrt over 
short dress. 

•For bridesmaids, the party dress 
reemerges, overshadowing suites and 
separates. Floaty fabrics remain spring 
perennials, while jaunty stripes and 
polka dots are lively options. The new 
hues are soft and pale, creating a so- 
phisticated counterpoint to a bride In 
white or Ivory. 

•Bridal bouquets blossom with vivid 
colors (Influenced by a bounty of hy- 
brids from the International flower mar- 
ket), while the all-white nosegay 
remains a classic favorite. 
The honeymoon 

•High-adventure trips, from motor- 
cycle tours of the Grand Canyon to 
white-water kayaking down a rushing 
river. 

•Getaways to "eco-destlnatlons"— 
places of lush natural beauty, such as 
Costa Rica— are newly appealing, as 
are "environmentally-correct" hotels 
like the Post Ranch Inn In Big Sur, a hide- 
away built without a single red-wood 
destroyed. 






Siflc-q^as fyridal Salon 





•Tuxedo Rental & Sales 
•Silk Flowers, Invitations, Etc. 



Congratulations 
StMmn and Melissa 



November 12, 19M 



750 s. milwaukee 

gurnee, il 

708.362.make . 

•OUR HOURS ARE VERY CONVENIENT. Ask about our extended nigh* time hours! | 



16 West Behidere M (Rte. 120) 
Hainesville, IL 

(708) 223-3166 




■ "; * -■ - *r''';^;^".".;*^'-.'- P .;T.4. 



1 BRIDAL EXTRAVAGANZA UlabvNd Newspapers Ocrob» 7, 1994 




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HamJlton-Klrkpatrick 

Maria Michelle Hamilton of Lake 
Villa and James Michael Kiikpatrick of 
Waukegan exchanged their wedding 
vows on Sept. 4. Patricia Allen-Stewart 
of United Methodist Church of Lake 
Villa officiated at the double ring 
ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bruce Looyer of Lake Villa and 
Donald Hamilton of Maysville, Ky. She 
is a 1988 graduate of Grayslake 
Community High School is a dental 
assistant for Dr. Robert J. Brandt, 
D.D.S., in Grayslake. 

The groom is the son of Elizabeth 
Kirkpatrick of Joliet, and James 
Kirkpatrick of Marco Island, Fla. He is a 
1979 graduate of Joliet Twp. West High 
School and served six years in the U.S. 
Navy. He is employed as a state trooper 
by the Illinois State Police in Downers 
Grove. 

Maid of honor was Denise Foster. 
Bridesmaids were Maureen Fumagalli 
and Tracy Hoover. Stephanie Contos 
served as flower girl. 

Royce Noirfalise was best man. 
Groomsmen were Donald Looyer and 
David Strampel. Shawn Tofte and 
Russell Precht were the ushers. Ring 
bearer was Nicholas Jeppeson. 

A reception was held at the Tower 




Mr. and Mrs. lames 
Michael Kirkpatrick 

Room in Antioch. The couple went on a 
honeymoon trip to Florida and a cruise 
to the Bahamas. 

The couple has made their home in 
Lake County. 



Smlth-Langer 

Stacy L. Smith of Crystal Lake and 
Michael J. Langer of Round Lake Beach 
exchanged wedding vows on July 9. 
Father Joe officiated . at the ceremony at 
St. Elizabeth Ann Seaton in Crystal 
Lake. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas R. Smith of Crystal Lake. 

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
G.P. Lange of Round Lake Beach. He is 
a graduate of Illinois State Univ. where 
he was a member of Delta Sigma Phi 
fraternity.' He is employed by the 
Gurnee Police Dept. , 

Maid of honor was Linda Roesslein. 
Bridesmaids were Amy Vogelman, Kiki 
Sorley, Cindy Yunker and Saundra 
Campbell. Meghan Smith served as 
flower girl. 

Eric Raucci was best man. 
Groomsmen were Dan Jazo, John 
Patzka, John Kavanagh and Tom 
Smith, Jr. Gage Roesslein was ring 
bearer. 

A reception for the newlywed couple 
was held at John Evans Inn in Crystal 
Lake, followed by a honeymoon cruise 
and trip to Florida. 

The couple has made their home in 
Zion. 




Mr. and Mrs. 
Michael Langer 




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you've got Style ../\^ 

find Biller Press offers a collection of wedding 
invitation designs, programs, napkins and 
many more personalized accessories and gifts. 

. . . .to reflect your personaCf fair. 

you'd (ove the fast and 

accurate service. 

BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 

966 Victoria Street Antioch 

(708)395-1203 Fax. 395-4232 

Bring this ad in for 

20% Off 

on your wedding order! 

m 



For that special occasion... 

Mother of the Bride/Groom 

Flower Girl 

Dresses 

Boys Tuxedos/Suits 

See Our Stunning Collection of 
Jewelry for Bridesmaids/Gifts / 
and Shoes by Hillary 



-i 

■ 



Apply for 

lack's credit 
cardand 

receive 90 
days interest 

Fum 



Op*n 

M-F10-* 

Smt. 1O-6:30 

, Sun. ,11-* •_ 



Women's & Children's Fashions 

Grand Avenue & Greenbay Rd. 
Waukegan (708) 662-6222 







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QUALITY 

WEDDING 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

FOR THE 

DISCERNING 

BRIDE 



309 Old McHenry Road 
Long Grove, Illinois 
(708)913-1300 
(800)498-1335 J 



BBS* 




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Ocrob«7, 1994 UldANd Newspapers BRIDAL EXTRAVAGANZA I 



. ,\ 




ravaganza 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 




' 




Mr. and Mrs. Douglas 
Howard Montgomery 



Brock-Montgomery 

Susan Elizabeth Brock of Grayslake 
and Douglas Howard Montgomery of 
Libertyville exchanged wedding vows 
on June 4. Rev. Jedediah Holdorph II 
officiated at the double ring ceremony 
at St. Lawrence Church in libertyville. : 

The bride is the daughter of 
Elizabeth Brock of Liberetyville and 
the late AJ. Brock. 

The groom is the son of Mary 
Montgomery of Libertyville. 

Maid of honor was Beverly Brock. 
Bridesmaids were Alison Montgomery, 
Patti Southard, Ellen Southard, Killeen 
Nielsen, Susan Raibikis, Cynthia Vento, 
Mary Boyes and Joy Schaefer. Emily 
Brock was the flower girl. 

Charles Montgomery was best man. 
Groomsmen were Glenn Gazzolo, Dan 
Harvey, Victor Raibikis and Matt 
Schaefer. 

A reception was held at the David 
Adler Cultural Center, followed by a 
honeymoon trip to Puerto Vallarta, 
Mexico. 

The couple has made their home in 
Grayslake. 





Mr. and Mrs. 
leffery Andershock 



MacDonald-Andershock 

DeeAnn MacDonald of Silver Lake, 
Wis., and Jeffery Andershock of Spring 
Grove exchanged wedding vows on 
June 25. Rev. Stephen Williams, 
formerly of the United Methodist 
Church in Antloch, officiated at the 
double ring ceremony at Steve and 
Wendy's Coral Reef in, Rochester, Wis. 
A reception followed the wedding. 

The bride is the daughter of Sandy 
and Bob White of Antioch and Gary 
MacDonald of Silver Lake, Wis. She is a 
graduate of Northern Illinois Univ. with 
a master's degree in organizational 
communication and is self employed. 

The groom is the son of Matilda 
Andershock of Michigan City, Ind., and 
the late Edward Andershock. He 
attended Purdue University and is 
employed as manager at 84 Lumber 
Co. of Crystal Lake. 

Honor attendants for the bride were 
Wendy DeWeirdt and Shari Proesel. 

Honor attendants for the groom 
were Todd Showerman and Glenn 
Proesel. Brett Singleton served as 
usher. 

The couple honeymooned in 
Jamaica and now reside in Silver Lake, 
Wis. 



3fo 9ii/rr/ WtY/rZ/str/ 



Marirule thequaintnessofa 

centuiy-old home of vintage 
decor wit! i the absolute charm 
of an intimate Bed & Brakfast 
honeymoonsuitcfara 
delectable flavor or romance. 

Reserve six well-appointed guestrooms 
for the bridal attendants and 
favorite aunts and uncles from 
out-of-town 

Set Aside two'crystal bowb of apple 

butter and strawberry dip for a 
■ breakfast table laden with 
gourmet goodies. 

A4d , one steaming cup of . 

Cappucino to complc te the 

meal. 





Pour into a ceremony of sacred vows 
God's blessing on marriage. 



To p with tliick meringue, browned to 
the perfection of bridal 
bouquets and a bed & brakfist 
houseful of earner aderie. 



SUrln 



Rake 



a bew of wedding clothes, gifts Serve 
and flowers. 



into a perfect keepsake of 
home videos of candid 
moments. 

with a reverie of tenderness ' 
and love in beds of lace and 
old fashioned quilts. 



Whip up a bowlful oflaughter and 
goodwill 



by Laura Loffrcdo, Innkeeper 
Round-Robin Bed & Breakfast Inn 




9lound~9lobin Sled & {Bwakfaat Sim 

231 E. Maple Ave. (Rt. 176) 

Mundelein, IL 

(708) 566-7664 . 



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YOUR SOURCE FOR 
WEDDING SUPPLIES! 

Custom Invitations Cake Toppers. . 

Table Skirts Keepsakes 

Banquet Rolls Helium Tank Rentals 

Balloons -Streamers Shower Favors 

PARTY POPPERS 

Your Source For Party Supplies 

939 Main St. • Antioch, IL 
(708) 395-4466 

Hours: Monday-Friday 9 to 7; Saturday 9 to 5; Sunday 10 to 2 






£y 



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i Plan A Wedding To Remember! 

S At The 

! RAMADA INN GRAND COURT 



■ 
■ 



517E.Hwy.83 
Mundelein, IL 60060 
(708) 566-5400/Sales 



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fTH BRIDAL EXTRA VACANZA UkflAJd N E wspAp G ns Ocfobti 7, f*94 





mvcujcinza Lakeland 

"S ')/^Sv V / Newspapers 




Skrzyp- Renihan 

Mr. and Mrs. James Skrzyp of Round 
Lake Beach, announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Nicole Bridget Skrzyp 
of DeKalb, to Bradley Charles Renihan 
of DeKalb, son of Mr. and Mrs. Terry 
Renihan of Lynn Center, III. The 
ceremony will be performed by Pastor 
Henry Dequin of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church of St. John in 
Sycamore, IU. on Oct. 14. 

The bride-to-be is a 1988 graduate 
of Round Lake Senior High School and 
a 1992 graduate of Northern Illinois 
Univ. and has a bachelor's degree in 
political science. She is currently 
completing a master's degree' in bio- 
medical politics at Northern Illinois 
Univ. 

The groom-to-be is a 1990 graduate graduate of Northern Illinois Univ. and 
of Orion High School and a 1994 has a bachelor's degree in finance. 




Nicole Skrzyp and 
Bradley Renihan 




ntiOCll Distinctive 

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Weddings... Onw Specialty 

Rooms to Accommodate 10 to 300 People 

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•Golf Outings 



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(708)395-1193 
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wD (708)234:6660 



Tomczak-Schmitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tomczak of 
Wauconda announce the engagement 
of their daughter, DoriAnne Tomczak of 
McHenry,, to William Schmitz of 
McHenry, son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Rizzo of McHenry. 

The ceremony will be performed by 
Fr. Eugene Keusal of St. Mary's Church, 
Fremont Center on Oct. 22. ■' 

The bride-to-be is a 1987 graduate of 
Carmel High School and a 1991 
graduate of the College of St. Benedict 
and has a bachelor of arts degree in 
business management. She is 
employed as a general manager for SCS 
in Wauconda. 

The groom-to-be is a 1985 graduate 
of Johnsburg High School and a 1986 
graduate of Wyoming Tech with a 
bachelor's degree in diesel technology. 
He is employed by Patten Tractor in 
Grayslake. 

A reception will be held at the Deer 
Path Inn in Lake Forest. 

The couple plans to settle in 
McHenry. 




DoriAnne Tomczak and 
William Schmitz, 



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Sorensen-Turnbull 

Shelia Lynn Sorensen of Waukegan 
and John Harold Turnbull of Grayslake, 
exchanged their wedding vows on Sept. 
3 at Millburn Congregational Church. 
Rev. Paul Meltzer officiated the double 
ring ceremony. 

*; The bride is the daughter of Rachael 
Dostalek. She is employed by SEDOL, 
(Special Education District of Lake 
County). * 

The groom is the son of Tom and 
Marianne Turnbull of Grayslake. 

Doris Emerson was the matron of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Gwen Shaw, 
Becky Workman, Patricia Jolly, and 
Donna Turnbull. Bethany Sorenson 
was the flower girl. 

Paul Turnbull served as the best 
man. Groomsmen were Shawn 
Thomas, Dave Paquette, Mike Quigley, 
and Jim Zradicka. Daniel Thual was the 
usher and the bride's escort. 

A reception for the newlywed 
couple was held at a private residence 
in Wauconda. A honeymoon trip to the 
Smokey Mountains was taken. 

The couple has made their home in 
Waukegan. , 




Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom Turnbull 



Vinzant-Bttrke 

Rhonda Hetrick Vinzant and Dustan 
Burke of Zton exchanged wedding 
vows in a double ring ceremony on 
Aug. 27 at the Holiday Inn Harborside, 
Kenosha, Wis. 

The bride is the daughter of Rosalie 
Hetrick of Vicksburg, Michigan and 
Donald and Pat Hetrick of Leondlas, 
Mich. She is editor-in-chief at 
Lakeland Newspapers, Grayslake. 

The groom is the son of Ethel Burke, 
LaCrosse, Wis., and the late Kenneth 
Burke. He is station manager for US N- 
TV at the Naval Training Center, Great 
Lakes. 

Matron of honor was Dana Ross. 
Daughters Amelia and Amanda Jo 
Vinzant and Samantha Burke were 
flower girls, 

Raphael Burke was best man. 

After a reception at the Holiday Inn 
Harborside, the couple went on a 
honeymoon trip to Mackinaw Island. 

The couple has made .their home in 
Ziori. 



Lakeland 





Mr. and Mrs. 
Dustan Burke 








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BAKERY 



LOVIN' OVEN CAKERY 

655 Rail Road Ave (Route 134), Round Lake, IL 

Stop by and visit our Bridal Sweet for all your wedding needs. 



.(708) 740-0830 



BANQU E T HA ELS 



ANDRE'S STEAK HOUSE & BANQUET FACILITY 

11106 Rt. 12, Richmond, IL 

We cater to all of your special wedding plans 

Great dates still available for 1994 (815) 078-2071 

THE COUNTRY SQUIRE 

Rt. 120 & Rt. 45, Crayslake, IL . 

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THE PRINCESS RESTAURANT 

1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL 

Wedding. Receptions To Fit All Budgets .... (708) 302-1290 

THE WATERFALLS 

24436 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 

For a simple touch of elegance ..:. (708) 395-2212 



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' DOLL HOUSE BEAUTY SALON • NEW LOCATION • 
95 W. Grand Ave., Suite 116, Lake Villa, IL 
Serving you since 1967 .. (708)350-8394 

SHOMAN HAIR STUDIO 

.2450 Grass Lake Rd., Lindenhurst, IL 

Nails and Tanning Now Available ! (708) 350-8033 



CHAPEL & R1C11TION HAL! 



KEMPER CENTER 

6501 -3rd Ave., Kenosha, WI 

Located on Lake Michigan ........ 



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ALTMAN'S FLOWER & GIFT BOX 

1025 N. Cedar Lake Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

Call us to make your wedding beautiful ! 

> BALMES FLOWER SHOP 
4949 W; Grand Ave., Gumee, IL .'. 

1720 Green Bay Rd., North Chicago, IL 

PRUNELLA'S FLOWER SHOPPE 

21 W. Grand Ave., Fox Lake, IL 60020 

Flowers to fit any budget ..: , ... 

RALPH'S FLORIST, INC. 

11 S. Fairfield, Round Lake, IL ... 

10 N. Forest, Fox Lake, IL 7. 



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15% OFF a targe selection of quality bedroom furniture for the bride & groom t , 

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1333 Delany Rd., Curnee, IL 

BARN LOFT NORTH TRAVEL 

277 Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 

Your Honeymoon Specialists.., '.. 

CROSSROADS TRAVEL 

3567 W. Grand Ave., Gumee, IL 

Ask us about our Bridal Registry.... 

NORTH STAR TRAVEL 

Lindenhurst, IL (next to McDonald's) 

Cruise Specialists . ....: 

STONEHENCE TRAVEL 

5101 W. Washington, Gumee, IL (Saratoga Square) 

Call for Honeymoon Specials ; 



(708) 249-4994 



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Your In Good Hands ., COS) 735-9500 




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966 Victoria St., Antioch, IL 

Complete line of Wedding Invitations & Accessories (708) 395-1203 

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26709 W. Wilmot Rd., Antioch, IL . 

Wedding invitations PLUS Napkins, Placecards, Favors, etc. (708) 395-5709 



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Rt. 45 & Rt. 120 (Located in Country Faire Plaza) 

Gray slake' s newest & most modern tan & nail center 


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BURKE PHOTOGRAPHY 

1120 South Old Rand Rd., Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

Wedding Specialties for 25 years . (708) 438-1990 

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1332 Sheridan Rd., Winthrop Harbor, IL 

Capturing your precious moments professionally (708) 872*3841 



RENTAL NEEDS 



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Golden Anniversary 

Al and Elaine Pioro, Fox Lake 
residents, recently celebrated their 50th 
wedding anniversary. The couple met 
in Utah while Al was stationed at 
Kearn's Field, Army/Air Corp Base. 
They were married In Utah and moved 
to Canada when Al was transferred 
there with other servicemen. Alter the 
war, they moved to Chicago. 

The couple has two sons: Mike, Pam 
and daughter Chrissy live in Virginia; 
Larry, Linnea and daughter Brandee 
live in Fox Lake. Larry and Linnea's 
other children; Jim, Patty, Keith and 
Heather, live in Des Plaines and 
Florida. The Pioro's also have a great- 
grandson, Sean, who lives In Florida. 

During a spring vacation to visit 
their son and his family in Virginia,- the 
couple went to West Virginia and were 
treated by their children to a weekend 
stay at the famous Greenbrier Resort. 
Just so the actual anniversary day was 
not forgotten, Al and .Elaine were 
invited to an anniversary dinner at 
their son's home in Fox Lake. Their son 




Mr. and Mrs. Al Ploro 

Larry drove to their house to pick them 
up and to their surprise, the car was 
decked out with balloons, ribbons, pop 
cans dragging behind them and a big 
sign posted in the back window stating: 
"Just Married — 50 years ago! 






^Invitations 

» Wedding Rings & Bands 
(May be ordered) 

» Wedding Gifts: 
Precious Moments, (Wedding Items & 
Figurines), jewelry, Bibles, Plaques etc. 

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(in the Linden Plaza) 



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Plus much more for that 
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24436 W. Rt. 173 • Antloch, IL 60002 
708-395-2212 f. 

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Address 



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(708) 39S-9242 



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LIPSERVICE *UI(eIan(1 Newspapers OcTobm 7/ 1994 






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It's tIhe taII< oF tIhie town 

Get h oFF youR cIhest (708) 225--8077 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Upservlce Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Par©nthOOd 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does 
not claim the content or the subject matter as fact but as the per- 
sonal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
right to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although. the 
call Is anonymous, please leave your village name. 



. Buyer beware 

Buying a home tn Lake County Is a 
very dangerous thing. First, you get 
sates reps that are the biggest liars 
In the entire world. I was so happy 
to see the articles on Sweetwater 
Mill. I live In Silver Oaks and we 
have problems like they do. Maybe 
not as many but enough. We tried 
to fight for what we stood for and 
have been labeled as the trouble- 
makers of the subdivision. There 
are a lot of dense people out 
there, I sure would like to get In 
tandem with that person from 
Sweetwater Mill, We have to do 
something to stand up for what Is 
right. We need more than just the 
village. I think we need to take It to 
our congressman, because too 
many of these contractors are rip- 
ping people off. 

No outlet 

I am a bit dazed and confused. 
Whatever happened to 'Do unto 
others as you have others do unto 
you?' I know there are a lot of 
people attending church these 
days. Are 1hey Just hearing the ser- 
mon and not listening? There Is a 
difference you know. I feel sorry for 
the people in Antloch who live on 
Bolles Rd. I live on Charmbrook in . 
Johnsburg, It sounds like It Is com- 
parable to Bolles Rd, except I live In 
a subdivision. Our homes here ore 
$200,000 to $300,000 homes. I 
assure you they are beautiful. 
People here go too fast so how 
can they ever see my house? 
Should Bolles residents pick and 
choose who drives In? Is It possible 
to close Bolles? Charmbrook can 
and should be closed. 

Trains by day 

This Is to the people who can't 
sleep because of the trains. Many 
of you probably do or will have 
teenage kids. I am sure they are 
out with friends late at night, if 
banned, those horns would not be 
working late at night when they are 
on their way home. God forbid 
anything would happen to them. 
What If you waited for that train 
during the day? Would you like to 
Imagine rush hour If the trains trav- 
eled then? Put you feet In other 
people's shoes and vote. 

Good eatin' 

I would like to know If any one has 
any Information about the Fixln's 
Restaurant on the corner of 
Whitney and Center Streets In 
Grayslake. We are. senior citizens 
and always enjoyed eallng there. 
We were very surprised to find it 



closed. We are hoping It will be 
open again real soon. 
Editorial Note: The owner of the 
building hat said during a down- 
town meeting that a restaurant will 
open 'sometime In the future.' 

Parental curfew 

This Is to the father who sdd his son 
has been unruly ever since a 
Round Lake police officer told the 
boy he did not have a curfew In 
the village. He said they were 
angry at the Round Lake Police for 
doing this. It is not the police's fault 
that your son Is staying out until all 
hours of the night. If someone asks 
the police a question about a cur- 
few, that officer Is obliged to tell 
the truth/which Is what that officer 
did. If that parent is so worried 
about the son being out so late he 
should gain some discipline over 
him. If he Is still legally responsible 
until he Is IB. he should be able to 
tell him what to do. 

Young for hire 

The Village of Round Lake Beach 
has a serious problem with hiring 
people who really need Jobs, espe- 
cially those who are younger. I 
graduated from high school with 
honors. I have applied for 10 Jobs In 
the last three months. I have 
called on several occasions to 
check up on those Jobs. Not once 
has anyone from any of those 
stores called me back. It seems 
that all of the Jobs are going to the 
older people who can't get any 
other Jobs due to lack of educa- 
tion. It would be n|ce If someone 
would give the younger people a 
chance for more than $4.25 an 
hour. We can work Just as hard as 
the older people do at the same 
Job. 

Invisible officers 

This Is a concerned citizen to the 
Round Lake Park Village Board and 
police department. Where are the 
police officers out on the streets? I 
don't see them anymore. They 
must go from call to call only 
because I don't see them any 
more. If you haven't paid atten- 
tion, we have several bars In town. 
There are a lot of drunks on the 
road. I work late so I see them all 
the time. There used to be a lot of 
people out there arresting drunks. 
What happened to them all. Open 
you eyes, people, We need more 
police and we need more DUI 
patrol. DUIs kill people. I hope It 
doesn't come down to that. The 
crime rate in Round Lake Park Is not 
getting any better. Thank you Mrs. 
Mayor, village board and the 
police department. 



This Is in response to the call 
'Curfew Is a must.' Even though 
you are 17 and don't have a state 
mandated curfew, you sill' have a 
parental curfew until you are IB. 
You should have your own kid 
under control. You can't blame 
the police. He Is only 1 7. Get con- 
trol of him yourself. 



*i 



Wild Bird Center 

For your enjoyment of backyard birds.™ 

IF YOU GIVE A HOOT, 
YOU WON'T SLEEP THE DAYS AWAY. 





Avoid 

the holida 

rush 



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o select the 

right gift! 



jv&%« /1/y Red To P Plaza 

I ID /€ UJJ | 1322 S. Milwaukee Avenue 

i All suet feeders \ Libertyville, Illinois 60048 
I and suet cakes ! (Behind Burger King) 

\m ioUfim^wMm$j$%0m$ 549-9990; 

gglil^^^^^KSSlJ Mon..Fri, 10*; Sat 10-5; Sun. 12-4 



Glorious greed 

I am the parent of two Round Lake • 
students, I heard there Is a possible 
teachers strike on the horizon, so I 
started to ask some questions. I 
found out 1he teachers we offered 
a three-year contract totaling a 12 
percent raise. This Includes their 
automatic step raise. The union 
wants a whopping 30 percent 
raise. I have worked for a major 
utility for 23 years and have never 
received a raise they would 
accept. Please, take your circus to 
a different town. Your greed Is 
appalling. 

Got a minute? 

This Is about the clerk In Round lake 
Heights. She how has more time to 
do less work for more money. She 
no longer supplies minutes to the 
public attending the meetings. * 

Pecking order 

This Is for the chicken man. Aren't 
chickens enough for you? Now 
you are after the birds In Fairfield 
Marsh. I sense there Is 'fowl' play 
going on. Leave the endangered 
species alone. Chickens should be 
enough for you. 

Green thumb 

This Is to the school board. 
Wouldn't It be more appropriate If 
you came to meetings dressed In 
clothes other than the ones with 
which you work In the garden? 
Round Lake has an Image'to pro- 
tect, (t Is up to you to further that 
image, not destroy it. 

Union-busters 

There will be no more baseball this 
year. The owners have us side with 
them because the players are 
overpaid. The way I see it the own- 
ers are only doing what owners 
across the country are trying to 
do— trying to bust unions. Who are 
the people who hired these players 
at such a high pay In the first 
place? All salary caps hurt every 
major sport. It hurts the players, not 
the owners. Now, ) hear, a strike is 
coming up for hockey. The owners 
did this to themselves. Thank good- 
ness football is here. If not the NFL 
then college, high school, or town- 
ship football. Cong/ess should 
repeal the antitrust exemption. This 



would give the fans, and all unions, 
a little more protection. 

Smoker's twilight 

I am a senior citizen and enjoy cig- 
arettes. Now I am told to choose 
between my pursuit of happiness 
and the rent and food. I cannot 
afford to pay for everything. I must 
give up something. Why must I 
give up something? I don't mind 
the restrictions on smoking In differ- 
ent places around town, but I 
enjoy cigarettes In my own home 
and I can't afford thorn anymore. I 
have been sryioklng for over 50 
years. Why am I not allowed to 
enjoy them In my twilight years? 



Need referendum 

I am responding to the call entitled 
'Same old, same old' In Upservlce. 
It talked about the Antloch High 
School referendum. I don't think 
the board has to worry about get- 
ting the message. I think It Is the 
residents need to get the message. 
Tax and spend sometimes Is the 
only solution. Here again, the 
caller who is a resident must not 
have children In the school or Is 
concerned about future genera- 
tions of his family In the school, 

Yes, If you only have $1 you can- 
not spend $1.50, but If you have 
thousands of students, you must be 
able to provide educational and 
safe facilities for them. You should 
also be able to provide enough 
teachers for them. This person 
obviously has no clue about what it 
takes to run a school and failed to 
mention the fact that the school 
board has worked over and over 
again on this referendum and the 
amount has decreased. The 
school Is not perfect but they do 
the best they can. As the mother 
of children there and the grand- 
parent of children to come, they 
do the best they can with their 
books. The board meetings are 
open to the public. Vote yes on 
the referendum. In November. 
Thank you for caring about our 
kids. 



Time for action 

What happened to the Gurnee res- 
idents action ^committee? Where 
are you, Lincoln? Too much Is 
going on In this community. Where 
Is everybody? Let's see some sup- 
port for this group. Write something 
to the editor. Call Upservlce. We 
were looking forward to" another 
wonderful year of you folks serving 
our needs. 

Editorial Note: The president has 
resigned from the group. A new 
president has not yet been named. 



Not in my back yard 

I am a concerned resident from 
Ubertyvllle. People of Rockland Rd, 
wake up. There Is a developer who 
wants to come In and build homes 
with an access road to Rockland 
Rd. The road Is very crowded. Let 
them have an access road at Rte 
176. Beware, 

Look before buying 

As a lifetime Lake Villa resident and 
commuter on Metra train rails, I find 
It quite amusing regarding people 
complaining about the horn noises, 
Unfortunately, you people that 
paid up to $200,000 for a new 
home In a new subdivision, wel- 
come to the neighborhood." You 
should have looked before you 
bought. Enjoy your evening sleep. 

Bad bikers 

I have a suggestion to those who 
ride bikes on Grayslake sidewalks, 
Please use the bike trails. Just say In 
a normal voice, 'On your left.' 
Then pass Us pedestrians to the left. 
Coming up silently Is dangerous 
and frightening. We sometimes 
move sideways while walking, 
especially while walking on. bad 
. sidewalks. 

Playing opossum 

This Is regarding the article In Police 
Beat about the children playing 
with the dead opossum on 
McKlnley Ave. Could these be the 
same kids that are out riding their 
bikes In . the middle of the road 
' without adult supervision, even late 
at night? This Is the road that the 
police and fire department use 
often. They should be much more 
careful. 

Need a raise 

This is In response to 'Problems 
raised.' What is a 'heck of a hefty 
pay raise?' As far as the teachers 
contract for Grayslake School 
District 46. we have not had a pay 
raise for several years. It Is exactly 
the same as it was four years ago. 
Get your facts straight. 

Historical girls 

In the Fox Lake Press it says the that 
the Grant High School boys soccer 
team made history. It Is not Just a 
boys team. There are many girls 
programs too. 

Environmental boss 

I am appalled by what the very 
young Mayor of Round Lake 
Heights Is doing to our environ- 
ment. Doesn't he believe In any- 
thing? What Is. he going to do to 
See LIPSERVICE page B27 



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OcTobER. 7,19.94 UhUnd, Newspapers LIPSERVICE 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



From page B26 

Fairfield Mash? Is he going to 
destroy all the wildlife out there for 
the sake of his bosses at 
Cambridge Homes? This Is carrying- 
loyalty to your boss a little too far. 

Slow and obey 

Before A) Salvi tells other people 
how to drive, In passing farm Imple- 
ments, he should check , his 
speedometer. According to 
Channel 2 News, he was one of the 
biggest violators' for speeding back 
from Springfield. Al. obey the law 
and then you can talk to us., 

Planes, trains and noise 

This Is to the people who are com- 
plaining about 1he Wisconsin 
Central Rail Line. They remind me 
of the people who move next to 
O'Hare Airport and complain 
about the airplane noise. If you 
move next to an airport, why would 
you expect If to close down Just 
because you moved there? 
People In Glenvlew are complain-. 
Ing about the helicopters coming, 
out of there. Glenvlew, O'Hare, 
and the Wisconsin Central were 
there long before most people 
decided to move there. Get a life. 

Taxpayer's friend 

This Is to 'Vote her In.' This Is con- 
gratulations to the Round Lake ■ 
Schools Superintendent Mary 
Davis. I would like to commend her 
for looking out for the tax payers of 
the school district. We asked for 
cuts in the school budgets and 
some reform, and she Is trying to do 
this with all the bad publicity. 
People are stating she is doing the 
opposite. These people think the 
teachers should .get everything . 
they demand. If these teachers 
don't feel they are making enough 
money, In this district, I feel they 
should go somewhere else. Try prl- . 
vate Industry and see if you can 
work for seven and a half months 
and get paid and receive the ben- 
efits you get now, I congratulate 
Mary Davis. As a taxpayer, I will 
support her as superintendent of 
the Round lake School District. I 
think people should be pleased 
wllh her accomplishments. 

If you build it 

Having been a long-time resident 
of Lake County, ! am appalled with 
the mentality of the bozos living In 
Long Grove and Hawthorn Woods. 
Face It, folks. Route 53 Is coming 
whether you like It or not. That one 
meathead who wants to blow his 
Inheritance on something as stupid 
as fighting It should get off his high 
horse. Hey, pal, your home Isn't 
worthless. It Is people like you who 
have created this traffic nightmare 
to begin with. Enjoy Rte 53. It will 
be real close for you to get on and 
off. 

Laughing criminals 

Mr. Clinton Is too worried about the 
rights of the people In Haiti. 
They've been fighting for a long 
time and they don't know what 
they want. He doesn't want to go 
through* Congress because he 
knows he would be. turned down. 
The American people don't want 
to be In Haiti. The liberal 
Democrats, Including Paul Simon 
and Carol Mosely-Braun are more 
Interested In people who have 
nothing to do with us than they are 
In us. They sure don't mind taking 
our rights away, like the fight to 
own a certain type of weapons. 
They passed a weak Crime Bill. The 
Republicans said. 'One strike and 
you are out.' Criminals are laugh- 
ing at the Crime Bill. When the 
elections come, we are going to 
vote out 1hese ■ liberals for good. 
The American people are fed up. 





Animal laws 

I would like" to Inform the new 
homeowners who have dogs In 
Lake Zurich that there are laws for 
'keeping your animal. He should be 
on a leash. He should not be bark- 
Jng for long perlods.of time. Don't 
be surprised If people don't talk to 
you If you let that happen. If you 
walk your dog by someone's. yard, 
you should not have hlm.go on the 
trees and the parkways. The park- 
way does not belong to you or your 
dog. It Is up to the homeowner to 
upkeep It. I am getting sick of It. If 
you are going to be a homeowner, 
you should be more considerate of 
your neighbors In the village. 

True condemnation 

I like fact, not rumors. Can someone 
help me? Is It true that Antloch High 



School condemned their visiting 
team bleachers at the football field, 
then someone In the community 
Invited to build new ones at no cost 
to the school? Apparently, the 
board turned him down. Please, I 
need to know before t vote. 

Educate yourself 

JablonsW, should get a Job. 
Democrat.for Sheriff JablonsW doesn't 
have a clue what he's talking about 
when referring to the Inmate educa-. 
tlon program at the JaU. It is a proac- 
tive approach by the sheriffs depart- 
ment to help curb the recidivism rate 
' by 1he inmates. I know, I work for the 
sheriffs department. Education Is the 
key issue of Governor Edgar's 
approach to crime prevention. 
Coming from a man who was ousted 
In Undenhurst and Round Lake 
Beach, I would not put much ere-- 



donee In him for the top law enforce- 
ment Job In the county, He has no 
due to what Is going on. Education is 
one prevention method. Open your 
eyes, JablonsW. 

Big McGroup 

Why does the Antloch Police 
Department let about 20 kids on 
bicycles and cars gather around 
McDonalds on Friday night? 

Put 'cigarettes' out 

I live off of Lake Nlpperslnk. I think 
there should be a speed limit on 
boats as well as a nighttime curfew 
on them.T don't know how many 
times I have been awaken In the 
middle of the morning. by all the- 
.yahoos screaming and yelling and 
having a good time. Dr. Dam, If 
you think it Is so wonderful to have 
the cigarette boats out there, why 



don't you- Invite th'em over for a 
night. Why do we have to bring in 
all the outsiders to fill the lake with 
beer cans and to turn up our 
waters Just to make money, There 
are people who live on these lakes 
and they would like to use them 
too. Instead we have to look out 
for an Idiot who might cut their 
boat In half,' Let's stop thinking so 
much about people who come 
here for a weekend, then go 
home. We pay taxes. Let's start 
thinking a little bit about the home- 
owners for once. . 

Bad taste 

I think It would have been more 
appropriate ■ for Lakeland 
Newspapers to do a story, of the 
double drowning and the story 
about the endless summer on dif- 
ferent pages. 







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GOOD BEGINNINGS UkelANd Newspapers Octobc* 7, 1994 



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4 " 

A Safe Place children's counselors r DEAR MARilyN 
offer model parenting skills 



Shawna Burns, one of two children's 
counselors at A Safe Place, the Lake 
County shelter for abused women and 
their children, was playing the board 
game, "Life," with a 7-year-old. The boy 
drew a card that read: "Get your uncle 
out of Jail.' 

'Do I have to?" he asked. Burns let 
htm draw another card. 

"Ufe, and living, can be a terrifying 
game In homes where there Is vio- 
lence," said Burns. She knows that with- 
out Intervention, this youngster could 
grow up to be just like his uncle 
because violence Is a learned behav- 
ior. Statistics show that children who 
grow up In violent homes are 1,000 
times more likely than others to be vio- 
lent during childhood and as adults. 

Learning coping mechanisms and 
how to react to anger without violence 
. are Important parts of the children's 
program at A Safe Place, which offers 
shelter, counseling and advocacy for 
victims of domestic violence In Lake, 
McHenry and northern Cook Counties. 
And there are many. 

Last year, 283 area children 
escaped with their mothers from violent 
homes for safety, shelter and compre- 
hensive counseling at A Safe Place. 
Among them were 76 non-resident chil- 
dren, ages 2 to 16, who came to A Safe 
Place for counseling. Some were former 
residents; others were referred by net- 
working social service agencies. 

In Individual and group sessions, 
counselors helped these children learn 
to deal non-violently with issues such as 
fear, guilt anger, confusion, loneliness 
and sexual assault. Their methods are 
models for. effective parenting. 



"We try to endow youngsters with a 
sense that who they are and what they 
need Isjmportant" said Phyllis DeMott 
A Safe Place executive director. "We 
may be the only people In their lives 
who actually listen to them." • 

Counselors listen at Kids' House 
Meeting, where house rules and con- 
flicts that arise In the shelter, are dis- 
cussed? And they listen in Kids' Group, 
where Issues range from domestic vio- 
lence to racial tolerance to kids' rights 
to positive communication. 

The groups have rules; no violence, 
and only one person talking at a time. 
"The feeling of being listened to Is Intox- 
icating," Bums says. 

And games have goals. 
Empowering children Is the goal as 
youngsters design their own paper 
crowns and make up rules for their own 
kingdoms. No hitting, no kicking, no 
name-calling come up as often as stay- 
ing up later and candy at all meals. 

• Safe expression of feelings Is the aim 
of a game where children place lami- 
nated cars on a map with streets 
named Angry Avenue, Happy Highway,' 
Sad Street Bored Boulevard, and the 
like. Bums asks them to tell a story about 
when they were on that street how they 
handled it and how they could have 
handled It better. "Most kids know," she 
says. "All of us know." 

Moms also meet wllh children's 
counselors to learn non-violent parent- 
ing techniques and universal parenting 
truths. An example: Time out. "Time outs 
aren't always for the child," Burns says. 
"Sometimes parents need one too."— 
by SONDRA SONNEHARN, development 
associate, A Safe Place, Waukegan 



Bring out the Picasso in your child 




ai 



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A white sheet of paper spread across a 
table and choice of markers chal- 
lenges this young artists' Imagination at 
a Family Network program.— Photo by 
Carol Brusslan 

Did Mlchaelangelo's father tell him It 
was Important to color Inside the lines? 

Did Picasso's mother tell him where 
to put the eyes on his pictures? 

Obviously notl The elements of cre- 
ative art that we admire, those which 
touch our hearts, are those that are true 
creations. Gifts from the Individuals to 
the world around them. "Art" Is not a 
craft project In which an adult assem- 
bles a model and presents It to a group 
of children to duplicate or alter. Art Is an 
expression of a child's Imagination. 
When children have access to a variety 
.of age-appropriate materials with the 



freedom to choose how they will be 
used, the innate artist can blossom. 

When we look at art for preschool 
children, experts agree a "hands-off" 
'approach Is best. Viktor Lowenfield. 
author of "Your Child and His Art" states 
that, "Art means a child has solved an 
individual problem In an Individual way. 
During the time a child Is working, he Is 
acquiring Important experiences for his 
growth. Allow him to develop his own 
techniques and experiments." Present- 
ing a child with pink rice, purple col- 
ored glue, a small paintbrush and some 
toilet paper rolls offers a wonder oppor- 
tunity for creating problem solving for 
children. 

If you would like to be Involved with 
your child's art activities, try creating 
one of your own that allows the child to 
experiment with a variety of materials. 
Going on a nature walk and collecting 
seeds, weeds, pine cones, and flowers 
Is an activity that can result In a beauti- 
ful collage that can be glued to some 
heavy cardboard. Development/ally 
appropriate art Is fun for everyone. This 
means a child will interpret the media 
according to his or her stage of devel- 
opment. 

In addition to Viktor Lowenfeld's 
book, a hands-off guide to art for the 
young cNid Is "Don't fV]ove the Muffin 
Tins" by educator, Bev. Bos. Creative 
Ideas for you and your child will allow 
you both to enjoy art at home.— by 
DEBORAH SHIRLEY, head Kindergarten 
teacher, . Paul K. Kennedy Child Care 
Center, VA Medical Center, North 
Chicago 



Dear Marilyn, 

A neighbor has asked me to help her start a "play group." Her child Is 16- 
months and my child Is almost 2. She also wants to ask a couple of other 
friends with kids about the same age. This Is a new Idea to me. What Is a play 
group and what are the benefits? 

A: A play group Is a wonderful way to bring mothers and very young chil- 
dren together In an Informal social learning situations. A play group Is unusu- 
ally not more than four or five youngsters, close In age, who meet for a few 
hours once a week. Each mother takes a turn being hostess to the group, with 
an adequate number of toys available. Young children at this age become 
more aware of other children and are happy to be together. With all mothers 
supporting and supervising these few hours each week, a play group can aid 
children as they grow and develop. 

. The benefits are great forchlld and mother. Your child has his first circle of 
friends. A child who Is shy, or aggressive, learns to Interact. Sharing or waiting 
a turn becomes more manageable, leadership ability Is tested, and lan- 
guage skills can increase dramatically, . 

For mothers, It Is a relaxing time with their chitd, helping him to grow, white 
enjoying the companionship of other women. 

Mothers also become aware of the many ways each parent may direct or 
assist their individual child, and perhaps, some of these ways might Work for 
them. I have known some play groups that have existed until the children are 
ready for preschool, sometimes adding an extra day a week as the children 
grow and their attention span Increases. 

Editor's note: Marilyn Strus, an Early Childhood Specialist, conlfnues her col- 
umn "Dear Marilyn* for Lakeland Newspapers, a service of the Child Care 
Coalition of Lake County. If you have a problem or concern you wish to 
address, write to Dear Marilyn, c/o Child Care Coalition of Lake County, P.O. . 
Box 1252. Highland Park, IL 60035. 



How to respond when kids challenge limits 



Stanley Tureckl, M.D., head of the 
Difficult Child Center In New York City, 
will speak Tuesday, Oct. J 8 at 8 p.m. at 
Nlles North High School auditorium, 
9800 N. Lawler Ave., Skokle, 

Turecki wilt offer behavior manage- 
ment guidelines that enable parents of 
children ages 1 through 6 to respond to 



everyday Issues such as cleaning up, 
sharing, dressing, eating, listening, and 
going to bed. 

Registration of $5 can be mailed to 
Parents Resource Network, P.O. Box 
.3054, Skokle, IL 60076 or $8 can be paid 
at the door. For more Information call 
675-3665. 



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OcTobit 7, 1994 UIceIancI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



*^ 




-Business BrjeFs 

YW€A recognition award 

McBENRY— Prem Magnetics, Inc. of McHcnry 
was presented the 1994 Corporate Recognition Award 
by the YWCA of Northeastern Illinois. The award was 
announced during the 16th annual Women of 
Achievement Benefit held at Marriott's Lincolnshire 
Resort. A manufacturer of coils and transformers for 
the electronic industry, Prem Magnetics offers its 
employees benefits that include college tuition schol- 
arships and employee tuition grants and an on-site 
child care center for 50 children. 

Dollars and sense handbook 

1NGLESIDE— "Your Dollars and Sense" by author 
and counselor Thomas L Johnson of Johnson and 
Associates has just been published and is available to 
the public. It is a practical handbook for anyone who 






Antioch, IL 60002 



V. 



.■ 



needs to learn how to weather the financial storm. 
Unlike most books on personal finances, Johnson 
won't tell you where to invest your money or how to 
diversify your portfolio, but Instead talks straight 
from the heart to those who feel there is no hope. For 
information about counseling services or to order the 
book, call 546-1099, 

SB A seeks person of the year 

LAKE COUNTY— The U.S. Small Business 
Administration (SBA) is looking for the successful 
small business man or woman who will become 
America's Small Business Person of the Year for 1995. 
The deadline for nominations is Nov. 23. Winners of 
the Illinois state competition compete for the nation- 
al tide. Each year since 1963, the president has desig- 
nated a week in May as National Small Business 
Week, in recognition of the small business communi- 
ty's contributions to the American economy. Nearly 



21 million strong, small businesses now employ 54 
percent of the private work force, produce 50 percent 
of the private sector output and create two out of 
every three new jobs. 

Winning women membership 

VOX LAKE— The Business and Professional 
Women of Lake County invites attendance to its 
"Annual Winning Women" membership event 
Thursday, Oct. 13, at the Lilac Apartments, 3 Lilac, 
Fox Lake. Networking and Buffet Supper begins at 6 
p.m., with program and keynote speakers at 7:30 • 
p.m. Featured speakers will be Barbara Richardson, 
Lake County Coroner and Willard Hollander, Lake 
County Clerk candidate. Regular dinner meetings 
are held at the Lambs Farm the second Thursday of 
each month. For further information call member- 
ship chairs Suzanne Dam 587-8669 or Pam King 
587-4242. 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



* ; -- ."■- "• . ; ;.'.; .." 





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Investment 
Trends 

Interest and how it 
affects yield RAGE C2 

^lahgand 
baking 

Restaurateur runs deli £ 
;arid'50s Styje&tery 

pAgec2 : 

Murphy on 
Real Estate 

Helping die mortgage 
process PAGE CJ 

Stock inarket 



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normal for economic 
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Company Price 

Abbott 303/4 
AUs«&M23 : l/2 : 
Amefftecli 38-7/8 
AT&T ;^52 5/8 
Baxter ^27 3/4 
Brunswick 20 1/4 +3/8 
JJnlcom '— - 
D. Winer 361/4 
Kemper 59 7/8 
McDonald* 26 3/8 -1/2 
Motorola 51 -13/8 
I Peoples En. 251/2 -1/2 
Qkr;0aks751/8 -21/B 
Sara Lee 221/2 
Sear* 473/8 

f:uj\L^§f^ : |;H 

WaJgreens37 
WMXTech.28 



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-1/2V 
-17/8 

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43/8 



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+3/8 i 

ii/8 

-3 3/4 
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lOjerry Elec. ; 16 3/4+3/43 



S6.72^ 
$1192 

■$L3|1 

$1.05 
50.44' 
S1.60 
$0.50 \ 
S0.92 
$6.24 1 

; ; $0.28:. 
51.80 ; 

1*2.28 
$0.64 
$1160 

'$0,00 
$0.68 

LW-60 
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Local stocks followed the mar- 
ket's general trend due to fear of 
Interest rate hikes. 



Stock Watch^ provided bjf;, 
Noah Seidenbtrg of Edward D, 
Jones St Co., Gruyslake. 



Gurnee fits into growing industrial mold 



NEAl TUCKER 
Staff Reporter 

The Village of Gurnee has 
placed another feather in its 
industrial cap. Nypro Chicago, a 
division of arguably the largest 
custom injection molding com- 
pany in the world, just dedicated 
its newest plant, a $10 million 
facility located in Gurnee. 

During the dedication cere- 
mony, which included speeches 
by company, state, county and 
village officials, Mayor Dick 
Welton'told of a much different 
Gurnee when he became mayor 
more than 22 years ago. 

■ Welton remembered Gurnee 
as a place that was losing popula- 
tion and money to states such as 
Wisconsin and Indiana: At that 
time, he and county officials put 
together a comprehensive plan 
that is now coming to fruition 
almost, daily. Their plan was 
designed to take advantage of a 
natural corporate and industrial 
resource that runs right through 
Gurnee— the 1-94 Tollway. 

The planning has paid off in 
spades with the addition of Great 
America, Gurnee Mills and its 
growing outlots, and the growth 
of the Tri- State Business Part 
Nypro Chicago, literally just a 
stone's throw from the tollway, is 
the latest addition to the park, 
and is already in the process of 
purchasing land to. the south of 
its 84,000 square-foot facility to 
accommodate future expansion. 
Nypro Chicago is one of five 
new plants that have gone on line 
or are under construction as part 
of the company's planned $40 mil- 
lion expansion effort. The Gurnee 
plant now employs 40 people with 
10 molding presses with plans for 
120 employees and 24 units. 
Fifty percent of Nypro's pro- 
> duction is for the healthcare 
industry. Nypro is the world's 
largest producer • pf custom- 
molded medical components. It 
is no coincidence that Nypro 
located its new plant in a county 
which already. holds two of the 
world's largest healthcare related 
corporations — Baxter Healthcare 
and Abbott Laboratories. 

The plant also houses a 
10,000 square-foot subsidiary 
called Nypro Mold Inc. Nypro 
Mold develops and manufactures 
the. custom steel molds that are 
used in the injection process to 



create the plastic parts. 

The area of the plant where 
the plastic molding takes place is 
state-of-the art. Robotically con- 
trolled manufacturing stations 
spew out thousands of molded 
plastic components per hour. 
Each component is computer- 
inspected for quality and purity.. 

The manufacturing area is 
known as the 'clean room.' 
Surgical hats, gowns and hair 
nets are worn at all times because 
clothes and even human skin 
release millions of particle impu- 
rities into the air each hour. 
Workers with any facial hair must 
also wear a surgical facemask. 



The air in the expansive room is 
completely recirculated every 
three minutes, running through a 
thorough filtering in the process. 

Each item is then tracked 
through each step of the packag- 
ing and distribution process with 
bar codes and laser scanners. 
The bar code holds all the infor- 
mation about the product and its 
destination and the laser scanner 
matches that information to a 
computer that also has complete 
data regarding the package. 

Nypro, headquartered in 
Clinton, Mass., has experienced 
dramatic expansion because of the. 
leadership of company President 



Gordon Lankton. In 1972, 
Lankton, a Peoria native, laid out a 
corporate mission he called the 
McDonalds Plan. He contended 
that a big part of that restaurant 
chain's success was based on qual- 
ity, cost-efficiency and consistency 
among its franchises. 

Lankton felt the same philos- 
ophy would work in the custom 
injection molding business. It 
has. The company is verifiably Z : 
global with plants in Asia, Europe 
and Puerto Rico in addition to 
throughout the United States. In 
1994, the company's sales 
reached $200 million with 2,200 
employees worldwide. 




Chris Navrafll, special projects manager for Nypro Chicago In Gurnee, lectures a group on custom 
plastic Injection molding during Nypro's open house. To keep parts pure, employees wear protec- 
tive garb to limit airborne particles. Nypro It a world Industrial leader In plastic custom injection 
molded medcal components.— Photo by Neal Tucker 



Financial advisor Carol L 
Passalaqua of Vernon Hills will be 
a featured speaker at Victory 
Memorial Hospital's second 
annual Feminine Forum from 
8:30 irn. to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, 
Oct 23, at the College of Lake 
County, Grayslake. Passalaqua 
will highlight the investment 
opportunities that can prove suc- 
cessful for the amateur investor 
in "Bulls vs. Bears— Investing 
Made Easy." 

The uncertainties of the 
investment markets often para- 
lyses beginner investors while 



speaks 



they invigorate the professional 
investor. Passalaqua will help 
attendees discuss their options 
and provide strategies that can be 
used right now to take advantage 
of the tremendous opportunities 
for financial success offered by 
Wall Street This is Passalaqua's 
second appearance at the forum. 
A respected financial advisor, 
Passalaqua has over 12 years 
experience in management of 
investments for individuals and 
corporations. She is a certified 
trust and financial advisor and a 
certifier financial planner. 



Feminine Forum is presented 
by the surgery department of 
Victory Memorial Hospital It fea- 
tures a series of workshops of 
interest to women, a health fair 
including free "pencil and paper" 
health screenings, a luncheon and 
a networking tea. A $25 advanced 
registration fee ($30 at the door) 
covers all workshop materials. 

Information on the workshops 
to be presented is available by 
calling Victory's community rela- 
tions department at 1-800-843- 
2464 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 







BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UIceIancI Newspapers OcTobe* 7, 1994 



-Investment TrencIs— DeU owner shakes and bakes in Volo 




Noah A. Seldenberg, 

Investment Representative of Edward D. Jones & Co, 

Interest rates and yield 

A topic of much conversation lately has 
been "What's going on with interest rates?" A very 
good question, but one that may need some 
research into where interest rates have been his- 
torically. 

Many people have forgotten where rates 
had been prior to 1978 and through the 1980s. 
Those who had CD's; mortgages, savings 
accounts, etc. before this time may remember 
getting interest rates of 3 to 4 percent on these 
things. In fact, many people don't realize that 
prior to 1978 the yield on a 30-year government 
bond had never even been over 8 percent, and this dates back to 1799. 
The average interest rate from 1799 to 1978 was around 4.5 percent. 
The average 30-year bond is now paying 7.8 percent. 

It wasn't until the mld-'80s that people were suddenly able to get 14 
percent on these same investments. Again, what many people forget 
about this time is that only only were taxes higher, but inflation was 
approaching double digits. Now, with inflation at around 2.5 to 3 percent, 
an investor is actually receiving a better return after taxes and inflation. 

Consider this example. An investor is getting 7 percent, which is 
what many five-year insured corporate bonds and government bonds 
arc paying. Also assume a 28 percent tax bracket and 3 percent infla- 
tion. The equation would look like this: 7 percent x 28 percent 
(tax]=5.04 percent after tax return — 3 percent (inf!ation)=2.04 percent 
total true return. 

What this means is that someone, especially someone living off a 
fixed income is actually able to have their money, grow even after taxes 
and inflation. On the other hand something Ihear quite often lately is 
"I am waiting for rates to go up before I invest any money into an 
investment — unfortunately, this causes many Investors to virtually 
guarantee themselves a loss of purchasing power. 

Consider this example: An investor waiting for rates to go up buys a 
six-month CD and keeps rolling It over. Suppose you arc able to find a 
CD paying 4 percent. Again, the calculation looks like this: 4 percent x 
28 pcrccnt=2.88 percent - 3 percent inflation = -0.12 percent return. 

This means that each year you would have to lower your standard of 
living because you would have less buying power. 

Editor's note: column highlighting stocks of local inter- 
est. The author, Noah Seidenberg, is the local representative 
for Edward D. Jones and Co., the nation's largest investment 
firm. For further information or additional questions, call 
223-1908. 

Seminar scheduled for entrepreneurs 

Entrepreneurs" will be held from 
6:30 to 10 p.m. Oct. 12 in Room 
C003 atCLC's Grayslake campus. 
The cost is $30. Visa, 
MasterCard and Discover will be 
accepted. To register, call 223- 
3633 or fax to 223-9371. 



Small business owners can 
learn how to handle risks and 
protect their business through 
insurance by attending an 
evening seminar at the College of 
Lake County. "Risk Management 
and Insurance for 



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TINA L SWIECH ___ 

Staff Reporter 

Baking bread Is her life, And 
so is making a wide array of 
healthy and delicious salads, 
sandwiches and side dishes. 

Theresa Meade Is the propri- 
etor and chef at "Theresa's Old 
Volo Deli" and "The Filling 
Station," a combination of two 
great eating places In the Old 
Volo Village mall. 

The deli side offers sit down 
or take and go foods including an 
assortment ■ of home-baked 
breads and rolls, pasta and veg- 
etable salads and also will offer 
dessert Items when available. 

Meade said she likes to bake 
breads but unfortunately doesn't 
always have the time, but most 
days she does she have the 
homemade bread on hand. 

Hie cast half of the building is 
a sit-down family-type establish- 
ment offering fun foods like hot 
dogs, shakes and malts in a '50s 
type atmosphere. 

The Filling Station restaurant 
goes over well with the many cus- 
tomers who come to the mall's 
Volo Auto Museum to check out 
the classic cars of yesteryear, or 
the antique shops In the mall. 

"People from all over come 
here. We've gotten people from 
Germany and Japan," said Meade. 

Meade doesn't like a boring 
menu. "The deli gives me the 
opportunity to create different 
things," she said. "There's some- 
thing different all the time.'* 

The breads she makes arc 
always fresh and healthy like the 
multi-grain or Meade's favorite — 
the oatmeal-almond. Probably 
the most popular item on her deli 




i 



: 



Theresa Meade, owner and chef at Theresa's Old Volo Dell and 
the Filling Station, displays a basket of fresh-baked breads from 
the Dell. Meade opened the two shops at the Old Volo Village 
Mall this spring.— Photo by Tina L Swlech 



menu arc the sandwiches which 
customers can have built accord- 
ing to their taste. 

Since the spring after she First 
opened, Meade has booked sev- 
eral parties In her dining room 
and encourages more. She is cur- 
rently getting ready for a big 



crowd that is scheduled to come 
to the Volo Auto Museum fall 
auto auction. 

Theresa's Old Volo Deli and 
The Filling Station are both open 
from 11 am. to 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. For more infor- 
mation call (015) 305-6393. 




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OcTobtit 7, 1994 UIceIancT Newspapers. BUSINESS/REAL, ESTATE 





-MuRphy on ReaI Estate— 

Jerri Murphy 

How to help the 
mortgage process 

The selection of your choice for a mortgage 
is an important one, There arc many questions 
'that should be answered prior to paying your 
non-refundable application fee. 

Much depends on the loan "processor", after 
you have submitted your loan application. The 
efficiency of the processor and their procedures 
\vill heavily depend on the timeliness of your 
mortgage approval. 

The mortgage company has a relationship 
with an appraisal company to facilitate the 
requirement for a current appraisal of the home purchase. The delays 
can be attributed to a delinquent order for an appraisal or the inability 
of the appraiser to get access to the premises. This is where the sales 
agent and cooperative agent need to monitor the time sequence to 
make sure things will move along. 

The applicant can also assist the reporting process. When an appli- 
cant is a new hire or a transfer from another city, alerting their new per- 
sonnel department of the verification can' speed the system. 
Oftentimes, the new hire arrives prior to the notification of the new 
destination's personnel department. Then, the report can "sit" on the 
desk in the personnel department until the formal notification comes 
through. Alerting the personnel office can circumvent this delay. 

Some lenders will allow the applicant to hand-carry for forms for 
deposit and account verification to their bank. This hand delivery can 
ensure a quicker response back to the mortgage lender. 

Some situations require special paperwork. If the applicant has had 
a divorce at any time, it may be necessary to submit copies of the 
decree to the lender. The lender is looking to verify possible monetary 
obligations imposed by the divorce decree. 

If an individual is an independent contractor or owns their own 
business, copies of their past tax returns will be required. If the buyer 
has a career that deals ■ with a renewable contract, a copy of this con- 
tract may be necessary to satisfy the underwriters' requirements. 

Although many applicants complain about the excessive validation 
and verification of income, obligations, contracts and credit applica- 
tions, understand that due to the problems the lending industry lias 
suffered, we need to assist the underwriting, requirements to effect a 
solid mortgage approval. 

• A reputable lender will offer a complete list of requirements at the 
time of application. However, sometimes after the portfolio has been 
assembled, there may be a few more informational items to make the 
approval process a sure thing. 

This is why it is important that your initial interview process with 
the lender you choose be a comprehensive one. Asking the right ques- 
tions before paying your application fee gives you the clear under- 
standing necessary to make the right decision for you. 

Be sure you feet comfortable with the commitment to service and 
integrity level of the lender you select for a smooth mortgage approval. 
Questions or comments may be directed to Jerri Murphy, Box 6234, 
Libertyville, IL 60048. . . ■ 

— BusiNESs Person in eI — — 




Patrick A. Salvt 

Patrick A Salvi of 
Lake Forest was elect- 
ed as a member of (lie 
board of directors of 
the prestigious 

national trial lawyer's 
organization known 
as Trial Lawyers for 
Public Justice at the 
American Trial Law- 
lycr's Convention in 
Chicago on July 23.TrlaI Lawyers for Public 
Justice includes (he most accomplished 
personal injury trial lawyers in the United 
States. Salvi heads his own six-attorney 
firm in Waukcgan, concentrating in seri- 
ous personal injury, medical malpractice 
and wrongful death cases in Lake, Cook 
and surrounding counties. His term is 
from 1994 to 1997, 

Edgardo De L os Santos 

Edgardo Dc Los 
Santos has been 
appointed director of 
physical therapy at 
Victory Memorial 
Hospital. His re- 
sponsibilities in- 
clude overseeing the 
physical, speech and 
occupational therapy 
programs at Victory 
Memorial Hospital as well as the Victory 
Physical Therapy Rehabilitation Center in 
Lake Villa De Los Santos has a bachelor's 
degree in physical therapy from the 
University of Santo Thomas, Manila, 



Philippines. Before joining Victory, he 
worked at Wcsllake Community Hospital 
in Melrose Park where he evaluated and 
treated both inpatients and outpatients 
with cardiac, neurological and orthopedic 
disabilities. He and his family reside in 
Woodridge. 



Edward D. Jones cites new investment 



Noah Spldcnbcrg, investment 
representative for Edward D. 
Jones & Co. in Grayslakc, 
announced that a new type of 
investment called a multi step-up 
callable note Is now available. 

"This investment Is actually a 
type of bond," Scidehbcrg 
explained. "Like a bond, It pro- 
vides return of principal and is 
backed by the credit of the issu- 
ing corporation or government 
agency, It carries the same credit 
rating as the issuer." 

Mult! step-up callable notes, 
like more traditional bonds, pay a 
fixed rate of Interest for a prede- 
termined amount of time. 

Unlike, a typical bond, howev- 
er, each year the note is not 
called, the investor receives a 
higher rate of interest in the form 



of a stepped-up coupon. The 
longer the bond Is not called, the 
higher the Interest rate paid on. 
the note. 

In most cases, however, multi 
step-up callable notes arc 
callable after a short lockout peri- 
od of one to three years. 

"What this means," 
Scldcnbcrg explains, "is although 
all of your principal will be 
returned at a future call date, you 
don't know when the note will be 
called. 

"If a fixed interest rate and a 
predetermined maturity date arc 
what make bonds attractive to 
you,, then multi step-up callable 
notes arc definitely not suitable 
for you." 

This Investment is most 
suitable for investors who fit 



four criteria: 

They believe interest rates 
will rise gradually. 

They are seeking an invest- 
ment with a short- to intermedi- 
ate-term maturity. 

They want a higher yield than 
other short-term investments can 
offer. 

They are comfortable knowing 
their principal maybe returned at 
any time during the' call period 
before maturity, 

Edward D. Jones & Co. traces 
its roots to 1871. 

Its more than 3,000 invest- 
ment representatives offer a full 
range of financial services from 
49 states as well as the District of 
Columbia. 

Seidenbcrg's office is. at 229 
Center Street or phone 223-190B. 



CLC job fair boasts 100 plus careers 



Business and service profes- 
sionals representing more than 
100 different careers will discuss 
jobs and career opportunities at 
the 21st annual career fair from 
fl:30 to 11:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 7, 
at the College of Lake County 
physical education center, 19351 



W. Washington St. tiort— from a high school diplo- 

The fair is intended for anyone ma to a doctorate degree— will be 

interested in choosing a first available at the fair. 



career, thinking about a career 
change or interested in learning 
about other careers.- Represen- 
tatives working in occupations 
requiring various levels of cduca- 



Thc career fair is free and 
open to the general public. For 
information, call Frank Nickels, 
CLC counselor, at 223-6601, ext. 
2535. 




Park place 

This park-like setting Is not a secluded retreat. It Is part of the corporate campus for Vision Tek, 
a computer memory manufacturer in Gurnee. The rapidly growing Grand Trl-State Business 
Park along the tollway features beautifully landscaped Industrial sites throughout.— Photo by 
Noal Tucker 



Wednesday at 

10 am. is the deadline 

for Classified Ads... 

Don't Forget 



iv<* *■' 



We're Home! 



\\ 




Thai's a favorite phrase more lllinolsans are using when they site their 
manufactured home in a manufactured housing rental community that 
is designed well and provides many services that manufactured home 
owners are looking for. 

For more information about Manufactured 
Home Rental Communities, call the Illinois 
Manufactured Housing Association at 
1-800-252.9495. 



... 




Will You Be 
Able to Retire 
When You Want... 
The Way You Want? 



Find Out at This Valuable Free Seminar. 



Whether your retirement dreams are full of navel, golf or flirting your own but in tss, making them 
cane true lakes careful planning that can't wait until tomorrow. Start now by attending ihls free, 
no-obligation presentation where you'll learn: 

•How to build a substantial retirement fund while combating the erosive effects of 

inflation and taxes 
•Which Investments are best for your current stage of life 
•What tools are available to help you map out a retirement plan 

"Planning a Secure Retirement Step-by-Step" 

Location : Best Inns of America 

1809 N. Milwaukee, Libertyville. IL 60048 

Dales: Thursday. October 13, 1994 
Thursday, October 20, 1994 

Time: 7:00-9:00 p,m. 

EACH SESSION IS DIFFERENT - PLAN TO ATTEND BOTH 

Each attendee will receive a Tree six-step guidebook. Plaa.faig. Secure Retirement. Please call In 
advance for reservations since sealing is limited. Or return this reservation request 



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Name _ 
Address 



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State 



Phone (h) 



(w) 



Zip 



A.G. Edwards clients, please provide the name of your investment broker. 




Member S1PC 

1984 A.O. Edwards & Sons, Inc. 



At Rodriguez 
1-800-888-4299 




BUSI NESS/REAL ESTATE UkclANcl Newspapers Ocrobw 7, 1 994 



Economic cycle spurs normal rally 



Is the stock market entering a 
new bull market or just rallying as 
the economic recovery runs its 
course? 

T. Scott McCartan, chief invest- 
ment officer of The First National 
Bank of Chicago, said he'd bet on a 
rally. 

"With the Federal Reserve rais- 
ing rates and the bond market not 
doing much, it is hard to sec more 
than a rally/' he said, in his month- 
ly Investment Perspectives 
newsletter to clients. 

The market is behaving in a 
manner consistent with the fourth 
and final phase of the economic 



Upscale shoppers 
have new choices 

Upscale North Shore shoppers 
have a new choice with the opening 
of Nordstrom's at Old Orchard 
Shopping Center. 

Nordstrom's is expected to have 
an impact on shopping habits at 
Hawthorn Center and Northbrook 
Court.The famed Seattle retailer 
opened for. business Friday at Old 
Orchard which has been virtually 
rebuilt. Major mall tenants included 
in the Old Orchard rehabilitation 
included Marshall Fields, Saks Fifth 
Avenue and Lord and Taylor. 
Bloomingdalc's is due to open next 
year. 

Officially, Hawthorn and 
Northbrook Court arc welcoming 
competition from the new "old- 
timer." Old Orchard was the North 
Shore's original major mail 

The resurgence at Old Orchard 
will be sort of an "all in the family" 
opening for Hawthorn, which 
shares the same mall management 
company. In fact, Linda Slavin, 
assistant mall manager at 
Hawthorn, was assisting with the 
Nordstrom's opening. 

Nordstrom's went to great 
lengths to be different from its 
Oakbrook Shopping Center store, 
especially with interior decorations. 

But the grand piano still will be 
part of the attraction.— by BILL 
SCHROEDER 



cycle, McCartan said. "It occurs in 
the mature part of the economic 
cycle, when bond prices decline, 
but stock prices keep rising, fueled 
by realized profit growth and profit 
expectations," he explained. 

"It's a happy time for equity 
investors as capital gains roll in," 
McCartan observed. "However, 
investors generally get carried away 
with this and bid prices to unrea- 
sonable heights, ignoring the lurk- 
ing danger of what higher interest 
rates eventually mean for the econ- 
omy and for corporate profits." 

McCartan said he believes the 
current rally has a "reasonable" 
chance of leading the market to sur- 
pass its high on the Dow Jones 
Industrial Average of 3978.36, hit on 
Jan. 31. 

By the same token, It's also a rea- 
sonable bet that the market wilt test 
the year's low point on the Dow— 
the 3593.35 established on April - 
before Jan. 1, McCartan added. 



What's key to watch is whether 
the Federal Reserve is able to engi- 
neer the much- discussed econom- 
ic "soft landing," McCartan said, 
"Tills Fed has done tilings that oth- 
ers have not, so perhaps the odds 
arc higher that we can avoid the 
extremes of recession or boom." 

And if the economy slows with- 
out stalling, 1905 will be quite good 
for stock investors, he suggested. 

"We're going to pull for a trading 
range roughly between this year's 
highs and lows during the near- 
term, betting that the economy set- 
tles into a lower growth mode, but 
soli grows," McCartan concluded. 

The First National Bank of 
Chicago, the tenth largest bank in 
the country, has more than 80 
branches throughout the Chicago 
metropolitan area providing lead- 
ing edge banking products and ser- 
vices to retail and business cus- 
tomers. It is a subsidiary of First 
Chicago Corporation. 




-ReaI Estate PersonneI 




Darryl Hayes 

Lifelong Lake 
County resident 
Darryl Hayes has 
joined the 

Libcrlyville office of 
Century 21 Kreuscr 
and Seller. Hayes 
has been an active 
licensed agent for 
over seven-and- 
onc-half years, le is a graduate of 
Zion-Benton Twp. High School and 
Barat College where he received a 
bachelor of arts degree in 
business/marketing. He is a licensed 
Real Estate Appraiser, a life member of 
The Million Dollar Club and serves as 
director for the Lake County Assn. of 
Realtors. Hayes is a member of the Mt 
ZIon Baptist Church, the Lake County 
Urban League, and the Barat College 
Alumni Assn. Hayes specializes in the 
sale of residential and Investment 
property in central and northeast Lake 
County. 

Michael Warren 

Michael Warren of Antioch has 
joined the staff of RE/ MAX Advantage 



$■ 



Professional Networking/Study Group 



$ 



O pportunity 



$. 



Profeaaional in the insurance and Investment business looking 

for entrepreneurial Attorney, CPA, Mortgage Broker and Real 

Estate Agent to form breakfast group for 

mutual professional growth. 

Contact: Craig Rawlins, CFP, CLU, CPA 
(708) 498-5800 Ext. 256 



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Realtors in Antioch. Warren is an 
active member of the Antioch commu- 
nity. Two decades ago, he and mer- 
chant Dill Patterson co-chaired the 
Chamber of Commerce committee 
responsible for the trees along Main 
Street and Lake Street. Me organized 
the Antioch Hc-dcvclopment Commis- 
sion and was its first chairman. He is a 
charter member of the Antioch Rotary 
Club and continues his participation 
as a senior active member. Warren has 
two of the four children living at home 
and attending Antioch Community 
High School. His 
second son, Mike 
Jr., is a senior at 
Northwestern Univ. 
and plays outside 
linebacker for the 
Wildcats. Dan 
Warren, the oldest 
son is an assistant 
manager at the 
MauroAuto Ma. 



I 
I 



Women's issues 

Today's woman, no matter her age, Is concerned about 
Improving relationships, caring for her family and advancing 
her career. On Oct. 23, 'Feminine Forum' at the College of 
Lake County In Grayslake will share a variety of personal 
growth, professional and health Information with Interested 
women. The event Is presented by the Surgery Department 
of Victory Memorial Hospital In Waukegaa Call 1 : 800-843- 
2464 for more Information. 



Insurance agents honored 




An agency manager and five 
agents in the Country Companies 
Northwest Lake Agency are among 
a group of 425 top life insurance 
producers for the insurance group 
at midyear. These top producers 
arc being recognized for their 
efforts by being named All Stars. 

Van Buchlcr of Ivanhoc, an 
agency manager, is included in this 
prestigious group based on the 
Northwest Lake Agency's life insur- 
ance sales and. excellent customer 
service from Jan. 1 to June 30. 

Local agents among the top 
producers are: Richard Frankson 



of Antioch, Kevin Glogovsky of 
Gurnee, Ed Macck of Antioch, 
Kurt Mcdc of Gurnee and Jim 
Pappas of lnglcside... 

These agents are included in this 
prestigious group based on their 
life insurance sales and, excellent 
customer service for the first six 
months of 1994. The Country 
Companies Agency Force totals 
more than 1,300 members. 

Country Life Insurance 
Company and Country Investors 
Life Assurance Company arc the 
life insurance companies of the 
Country Companies. :■.> 



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Visit Our Gurnee Showroom! 

3701 W. Grand Ave. • (708) 249-7676 
M, Th 8:30arn-8prh • T, W, F 8:30am-5pm • Sat 9am-4pm • Sun 11 am-3pm 





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OcTobtn 7, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers HEALTH WATCH 




Ml (li( A I Cl Mf R 



Grief support group . 

Saint Thcrcsc Medical 
Center's bereavement" pro-" 
grani for children between the 
j ages of 5 and 1 5 \. will be' held ; 
j the first and third M onday, of 
each month from 6:30 to 
p.m. The program will beheld 
at 2516 Washington ) St., 
Waukcgan. For additional 
information /call Mary 
Wheeler at 360-2259. 



L\ki CoiM\ Hi 

l)l |)AFtIMf M 



Blood pressure testing 

The Lake .County Health 
Dept. offers' -blood ' pressure 
testing at the following loca- 
tions: Fox Lake State Bank; 55 
■> E, Grand Ave, Oct 10 from 11, 
am. to 1 p;m;Cohsurnci J s Co : 
Op Credit Union, 1210 S. Lake 
St;Mundeleln on Octil fiprh 
10 am, to noon. Antloch 
Public library, 757 Main St, 
Antioch on Oct. 12 from 2 to 4 
p.m. Eagle Foods, 400' W.- 
Rollins M, Round Lake Reach 
on Oct.-26 from 2 to; 4 p.m. 

Mobile health 

The Lake County Health 
Dept Mobile Health Service 
will be at the following loca- 
tions: Warren Twp. Citizens 
Bldg., 17801 W Washington,. 
Gurnec oh 6ct*7; 14, 21 and 28 
from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Call 244- 
' 1101. Harry Khiggc Civic 
Center, 95 E. Main St., ;Lake \ 
Zurich on Oct 12 and 24 from ) 
9 to 1 1130 am. Call 438-7823. 

Immunization clinics 

The Lake Coun ty Health 
Dept. offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County chil- 
dren at the following loca- 
tions: Lake County Health 
Dept. Belvidcre Medical 
Bldg., 2400 Bclvldere Rd.; 
Waukegan every Monday : 
from 1 to 3 p.m.; Tuesdays 
from 8 to 10 v am,; : and 1 
Thursday from 1 to 3 p.m; No 
appointments arc necessary. 
■%' .Trinity Lutheran Church, 
25519.W, Hwy. 134, lngleslde 
on Oct. 12 from 9 to 11 a;m. 
No appointment necessary. 

A/FW Post 4551, 75 North 
Aye., Antloch on Oct. 19 from 
9 to 11 a.m. No appointment 
necessary. American Legion 
•; Post 867* Rtcs. 176,- 60 and • 
•83, Mundelein onjOct. 26 
from 9 to 11 am. No 
appointment necessary. 



SISIl KS 

SL j)|)()ltl (,UOl j> 



, Silicone Information 
Support Through .Education, \ 
Resources and Services (SIS- 
TERS) Is a support group for 
women, created and run by 
women. The purpose of this 
group is to assist women in 
their decision making process, 
as well as to provide support for 
those who are sick due to sili- 
cone implantation. Meetings 
are held at John.Hersey High 
School, 1900 E. Thomas, 
Arlington Heights, the first 
Wednesday ( of each month 
starting with Nov. 2. The meet- 
ings will be held in the school 
cafeteria from 7 to 9 p.m.; For 
further information call Laura 
at 272-0667, Steph at 837-B255 
or Peggy at 832-0527. 



Millman to speak on parenting at Feminine Forum 



Positive parenting in the 1990s 
Is a real challenge. Joyce Millman, 
director of parent- services, 
NICASA, will discuss the impor- 
tance of developing strong family 
ties in her workshop, "Positive 
Parenting. " Her presentation is 
one of 12 workshops scheduled at 
Victory Memorial Hospital's 
Feminine Forum which Is sched- 
uled from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
on Sunday/ Oct. 23, at the College 
of Lake County, Grayslake. 

Parenting is a greater chal- 
lenge today than ever before. 
Today's children encounter vio- 
lence and have access to alcohol 
and drugs at early ages. While 
parents recognize their role is 
increasingly more important, 



they find less time to do It. 
'Millman's workshop will identify 
ways to improve the parent's 
position in the family and to fos- 
ter a home environment of 
encouragement and learning. 

Millman has a strong under- 
standing of family interactions. 
She conceived, developed, mar- 
keted and facilitated the nation- 
ally recognized Parent Project, a 
unique workplace parent training 
program. She trained and super- 
vised all additional project facili- 
tators and consults to Illinois prc- 
ventionists offering the program 
through Lt. Gov. Kustra's "The 
Parenting Partnership" Initiative. 
Millman chairs the Family 
Committee of the Illinois 



Alcoholism and Drug 

Dependency Assn. and is an 
elected representative to the 
IADDA Prevention Steering 
Committee. A member of - the 
Lake County Fighting 'Back 
Project, Millman serves on the 
group's Healthy Family, Healthy 
Child action team. 

Millman has over 30 years 
experience as an educator i n high 
school, college and adult learning 
settings. A peer counseling move- 
ment leader since 1971, she has 
led classes and workshops on 
Interpersonal relationships and 
communication skills in the U.S., 
Canada and Europe. 'As a mem- 
ber and then chair of the Chicago 
Abused Women Coalition board 



of directors, Millman was instru-. 
mental In opening and running 
the first shelter for abused 
women and their children In 
Chicago. 

/ Feminine Forum is presented 
by the surgery department of 
Victory Memorial Hospital: It fea- 
tures a series of workshops of 
interest to women — a health fair 
including free "pencil and paper" 
health screenings, a luncheon 
; and a networking tea. A $25 
advanced registration fee ($30 at 
the door) covers all workshop 
materials. Information on .the 
workshops to be presented is 
available by calling Victory's 
community relations department 
at 1-800-843-2464. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 




-Women's 

How to understand your adolescent daughter 



MERRY MILLER, M.D. 

Julie used to he such a happy 
little girl. She was always eager to 
be helpful, excited about school, 
fond of spending time with her 
family. She was very outgoing 
and loved to play with her 
friends. 

Lately Julie has changed. She 
is now a teen. She spends a lot of 
time alone in her room. She can 
think of few things less fun than 
spending the day with her par- 
ents and brother. She spends a 
tremendous amount of time on 
the phone, discussing all the lat- 
est developments among her 
group of peers. She feels incredi- 
bly hurt when her girlfriends 
leave her out of something, and 
sometimes withdraws from 
everyone for a few days while she 
nurses her hurt feelings. 

Healthcare study 
forum set for Oct. 7 

On Oct 7, Highland Park 
Hospital will reveal the findings of 
a healthcare study that provides 
the most recent comprehensive 
assessment of the health status of 
Lake County residents. All are 
invited to take part in this special 
■ forum to learn more about the 
state of health in Lake County 
today. During the forum, Highland 
Park Hospital also will issue a call 
for a countywide partnership of 
community healthcare providers 
with the goal of creating a health!- . 
cr, better informed public 

The study, "Lake County 
Health Needs Profile," provides an 
extensive look at the health of Lake 
County residents compared to 
others around the state and coun- 
try. Participants will share the 
good news, and the bad news, 
about how Lake County residents 
measure up in a variety of health 
areas, including heart disease, 
cancer, mental illness, smoking, 
drinking, and weight control. 

A broad range of legislators 
and healthcare decision makers 
for ail segments of the Lake 
County community arc expected 
to participate. The forum will take 
place at Highland Park Hospital, 
718 Glenview Ave., during the fol- 
lowing hours: 9 to 10 a.m., general 
meeting; 10 to 10:30 am., media 
briefing and question and answer 
session. 



Sometimes she gets terribly irrita- 
ble, like the time she got furious 
with her mother for interrupting 
her important phone conversa- 
tion. She got so mad that day that 
she seriously considered running 
away. Other times, she gets 
tremendously excited, like when 
the new boy in her school seemed 
to show some interest in her. Her 
parents wonder when and why 
and hoc Julie became so moody. 

Can anyone understand the 
adolescent female? How much 
moodiness and changed behav- 
ior is "normal"? What can parents 
do to guide their teen? 

Growing up in our society 
today involves many stresses and 
challenges as well as opportuni- 
ties. The adolescent girl typically 
experiences a wide gamut of 
emotions as she "grows up." 



Establishing her own identity, 
developing intimacy with peers, 
experiencing bodily maturation 
including hormonal changes and 
sexual drives, and beginning the 
process of separation from par- 
ents arc all issues for the adoles- 
cent girl. 

Studies indicate that self- 
esteem for females often plum- 
mets ad adolescence. It is com- 
mon for the adolescent female to 
be plagued by self-doubt regard- 
ing her appearance and worth. - 
This decline in self-esteem at 
adolescence appears to be much 
worse for females than males. 

At times this concern about 
appearance can be associated 
with gross distortions of body 
image. A healthy or thin girl may 
see herself as obese despite all 
indications otherwise. In some 




cases, these| 
girls may begir 
to develop eat- 
ing disorders such as bulimia and 
anorexia, in a desperate attempt 
to make themselves become 
more and more thin. Typically 
the girl with an eating disorder 
continues to see herself as fat, 
even if she becomes emaciated. 
In severe cases, both anorexia 
and bulimia can become life- 
threatening. 
■ The majority of teenage giris 
do not have eating disorders, yet 
they do struggle to accept and 
feel confident of their changing 
bodies. The onset of puberty and 
the first stirrings of sexual desire 
may bring much discomfort. It is 
not unusual for adolescent girls 
to have guilt about their sexual 
See DAUGHTER page B-(HW2) 



Victory Lakes... The Natural Choice. 

Victory Lakes provides family-centered, quality long-term care in a natural home-like environment. 
We realize that when a loved one must separate from the family, it can be a difficult experience for everyone 
involved. At Victory Lakes, we try to make this'transition a little easier by having open visiting hours and 
encouraging family and friends to stop by and join in our many resident activities and holiday gatherings. 



Victory Lakes offers comfort, convenience, and concern. From the raised, outdoor flower beds for our 
wheelchair-bound gardeners to the cozy dining room to our in-house beauty parlor and colorful aviary 

to the sparkling clean living areas, loving care is evident everywhere. 



Come visit anytime. Meet our professional staff. Get to know 
firsthand what you can expect from a quality nursing home 
environment. 



We offer: 




• Long-Term Nursing Care 

• Rehabilitation/Medicare Unit - short term 

• Alzheimer's and Related Disorders Unit 

• Respite Care Program - overnight to 30 days 



Please call (708) 356-5900 for a tour. 




Victory Lakes . 
Continuing Care Center 



1055 East Grand Avenue • Lindcnhuret, IL 

7 mites nest ofRi. 94 • Affiliated wtth Victory Memorial Hospital 







HEALTHWATCH UIceIancJ Newspapers OcTobcn 7, 1994 



Daughter— 

From page B^rtfiwi) 
urges. Some may have great diffi- 
culty setting limits with mates. 
Acquiring a sense of control over 
their own bodies Is a large issue 
for many adolescent girls. 

Although some Internal turmoil 
.and increased intensity of emotion 
Is a common and "normal" feature 
of adolescence, severe conflict and 
emotional despair may signal a 
more serious prohlcm. Teenagers 
who withdraw socially, suffer dra- 
matic mood swings and experi- 
ence increasing conflicts with par- 
ents and peers may be showing 
signs of depression or other emo- 
tional Illnesses. 

As in adults, other red flags for 
depression include changes in 
sleep and appetite, difficulty con- 
centrating, loss of Interests, 
decreased motivation, crying 
spelts, fatigue and suicidal 
thoughts. Teenagers may addi- 
tionally demonstrate an increase 
in acting-out behaviors and 
school problems. Since very good 
treatments for depression arc 
available, it Is important to recog- 
nize these warning signs. 

Another possible problem 
area for teenagers is the develop- 
ment of problems with alcohol 
and drugs. It Is common for 
teenagers to feel the desire to 
experiment, and sometimes alco- 
hol and drug use is also used as a 
means of rebellion. Substance 
abuse can interfere with school 
performance, damage relation- 
ships with peers and family, and 
lead to depression and poor self- 
esteem. Parents should maintain 
alertness for signs of substance 
abuse and confront these issues 
as early as possible. 

So what is "normal"? What real- 
ly matters to an adolescent female? 
The traditional concept for under- 
standing adolescent development 
has emphasized the importance of 
separating from parents and devel- 
oping independence. Although 
these processes arc underway in 
the adolescent girl, more recently a 
different understanding has 
emerged. For the adolescent 
female, the desire to establish rela- 
tionships with others and feci con- 
nected appears to be more impor- 
tant than separation. Whereas ado- 
lescent boys arc often primarily dri- 
ven to compete and achieve and try 
to attain mastery, adolescent girls 
instead often put top* priority on 
relating to others. 

Achievement, of course, is 
important to girls, too, but stabil- 
ity of relationships is a crucial ele- 
ment for their self-esteem and 
sense of well-being. 

Key relationships for the ado- 
lescent girl may experience much 
turmoil. For example, she may be 
very eager to establish her inde- 
pendence from her parents, and 
may develop rebellious behaviors 
to prove herself as different from 
her parents and "in control." Yet 
simultaneously she. may want to 
be taken care of. Her relation- 
ships arc fluid, and shift back and 
forth between independence and 
dependence, rebellion and close- 
ness. Tolerance for this process is 
an important ingredient in main- 
taining a healthy relationship. 

Some adolescent girls may feel 
the need to spend much energy 
taking care of others. This may 
even extend to taking care of her 
own parents. As adult women 
make moves into the workplace 
and struggle with their own iden- 
tities, their daughters sometimes 
perceive the need to assume a 
"mothering" role. They may take 
care of siblings, friends and then- 
parents, although sometimes 
with an edge of resentment at 
being placed in this position. 

So how can one parent an ado- 
lescent so as to maximize the hope 



and minimize the pain? A mixture 
of clear, consistent limits, nurtu- 
rancc, and open communication 
seems to be the best approach. 
Adolescents are notorious for test- 
ing limits and should have clear 
messages on what is allowed and 
the consequences for acting out 



At the same time, teens like Julie 
crave closeness and need to expe- 
rience warmth and acceptance 
from their parents. Parents can 
help build and preserve their 
daughter's self-esteem through 
tolerance, consistency and aware- 
ness of Influences. 



Overall adolescence Is a time of. 
tremendous potential. Indcpcn- 
* dence, control, freedom, Intimacy, 
adult Interests arc all just around 
the comer, on the next horizon. 
Getting there can have its moments 
of pain and doubt, but there Is 
much reason for hope. 



Merry Miller, M.D., is a board 
certified psychiatrist and is the 
director of The Women's Circle oj 
Health in conjunction with 
Neuropsych in Ubertyville. She is 
also on staff at St. Therese Medical 
Center in Liber tyville. For com- 
ments, call 680-647B. 



N 



N N' U 



FEMININE FORUM 

PRESENTED BY VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1994 

AT THE COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY - GRAYSLAKE, IL 



■8:00 -9:00 AM 

REGISTRATION 

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 

HEALTH INFORMATION FAIR 

9:05 AM - 10:15 AM 

GENERAL SESSION 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER 

Laughter: The Best Medicine 

Speaker - Marilyn Grey 

Learn how to relieve stress and 

find humor in everyday life. 

10:30 -11:30 AM 

SESSION 1 

(Choose one of the following) 

1. Maria Swanson 

What Part of "No" 

Don't You Understand? 

Learn how to deal with 

difficult people. 

2. Carol Passalaqua . 

Bulls vs Bears: 

Investing Made Easy 

Strategize for stock market success. 

3. Joyce Millman 

Positive Parenting 

Overcome negative societal 

influences and increase family ties. 

4. Betty Massie,Ph.D 

Linda Sizemore, Ph.D 

GailPurdy / Ph.D 

Help, Let Me Off! 

Learn how to maneuver 

through stressful situations. 

11:30AM -12:10 PM 

LUNCH 

HEALTH INFORMATION FAIR 

12:15 -1:15PM 
GENERAL SESSION 
KEYNOTE SPEAKER 

Celebration! 

Speaker - Marilyn Grey 

Increase your zest for life by 

finding opportunities for 
celebration in everyday events. 

1:30 -2:30 PM 

SESSION 2 

(Choose one of the following) 

1. Carol Eiffler-Orton 
Mentoring: A Key Alliance 

for Success 
Enhance your professional life 
by becoming a mentor or protege. 

2. Sue Politakis, R.D 
What's the Big Fat Deal? 

Understand fats and how they 
affect weight and wellness. 



,mr\—rw>fi7* 



^*"***3K! 



.«£ 



7K 






■iff 



is:i 



_ , ■ "■ -■.■■■■ ; 



^Hi«j.- ..-■ 



***»».-]&*. 



■ ^ ■ R 



3. Betty Massie, Ph.D 
Linda Sizemore, Ph.D 

Gail Furdy, Ph.D 

He lust Doesn't Get It 

Learn how to improve 

communication between the sexes. 

4. Eileen Strohmayer, M.D. 

Masquerading Menopause 

Ways to effectively cope with 

your "change of life." 

2:45 -3:45 PM 
SESSION 3 
(Choose one of the following) 
1. Patricia Smith-Pierce, Ph.D 
Dress for Success 
Find out how to improve 
your professional presence. 

2. Kristina Zahorik 
Women in the Workplace 
A senior legislative aide to 

Senator Paul Simon, 
Ms. Zahorik will discuss the 
status of employed women. 

3. Marta Swanson 
How to Wear a Skirt 

and Not Get Taken 

Learn how to become a more 

knowledgeable consumer. 

4. Susan O'Halloran 

Pla y in g Fair 

in an Unfair World 

Explore how you can be treated 

with respect and vice-versa. 

3:45 -4:30PM 
NETWORKING * TEA 



For more information or to 

register, call . 
1-800-The Choice (843-2464). 

The early registration fee is $25 

and includes workshop 

materials, continental breakfast, 

lunch and a networking tea. 

Space for some sessions is 

limited. Same day registration 

is $30, and, we are unable to 

guarantee luncheon availability. 

Sorry, no refunds after October 19. 



If you can not come early on 

Sunday morning, registration 

will be open until noon. You can 

still hear the keynote speaker 

and join a number of classes. 



FOR INFORMATION CALL 1-800 THE CHOICE 



JjLll 



hUi>A iS' ; 



..J&THttStB&^w.'V*:;: 



■■ 



I 



t 



Sf 



l 



. — 9X ... — , 



,-.*.***'<■*.»■ < 



t. .vr * 



OcTobH 7, 1994 LaIceM Newspapers HEALTHWATCH 










7 



I 



ff 






Children collect can pop tops for charity 



Relatives, friends and neigh- 
bors of two local youngsters 
undergoing treatment for cancer 
have collected literally thousands 
of aluminum can pop tops and 
will use the proceeds to benefit 
the Ronald McDonald House at 
Loyola Univ. Medical Center, 
Maywood. 

The outpouring of support 
comes on behalf of nine-year-old 
Julie Johnson of lnglcslde, a 
fourth-grader at Gavin North 
School; in the Lake Villa School 
Disc, and five-year-old Anne 
Hcnnigan, who attends Kinder- 
garten at the Mill St. -School in 
Napcrville. 



For Julie, children at the Gavin 
North School made pop top col' 
lecting a special project and 
helped gamer the assistance of 
the school district and Inglcsidc 
community. 

Anne's grandparents initiated 
the pop top project in their neigh- 
borhood on Chicago's southwest 
side. Helping them were the cou- 
ple's friends at the Ridge Country. 
Club In Chicago and one of the 
child's uncles, who works for the 
Chicago Transit Authority. 

The pop tops will be sold to a 
recycling organization through 
the cooperation of Ronald 
McDonald Children's Charities. 



Proceeds will benefit The Caring 
Place at Loyola, a Ronald 
McDonald House that Is being 
constructed adjacent to Loyola's 
medical center campus on land 
donated by Mines Veterans 
Affairs Hospital. 

The 15-bcdroom, $3.5 million 
Caring Place will provide a "home- 
away-from-homc" for families of 
children undergoing treatment for 
serious illnesses. Not only will the 
facility offer a place of rest near the 
center of care, it will give guests the 
opportunity to share experiences 
and receive emotional support 
from other families in similar cir- 
cumstanccs. 



mm 



THE 




I I 



'"'* 

•?/' 



S\i\i I hi i 
\1mIk \l C i 



Grief support group 

Saint Thcrcse Medical 
Center's bereavement prof, 
gram for children ; betwee n 
die ages of 5" and 15 will; bes 
held the first and third 
Monday of each month from 
6:30; to 8. p.m. The. program 
willf :-he\ held at 2516 
'Washington St., Waukegan. 
For additional information 
call Mary Wheeler at 360- 
2259. 



LaInI Col m\ Hi 

|)l pAUIMt M 



Blood pressure testing 

The like County; Health 
Dept offers blood pressure 
testing '.at the foUbwingJoca- 
tions: Fox Lake State Bank, 
55^E; Grand Ave., dct. 10; 
from 11} a.m; : to l;]:pjn v ' 
Consumer's Co- Op Credit 
Union, 1210 S. Lake St, 
Mundeleln on Oct 11 from; 
10; aum^ to noon. Atitloch 
Public Ubirary, 757 Main St, 
Antioch oil Oct 12 from 2 to 
4 pim/ Eagle Foods^;4O0^W>; 
Rollins Rd., Round Lake 
Bpach on Oct 26 from 2 to4 
P«n. 



Bldg, 17801 W. Washington, 
Gurnee on Oct 7, 14, 21 and 
28 from 5 to 7:30:p.m. Call; 
244-lldli Harry Khi^e Civic i\ 
Center, 95 IL Main St; Lake- 
Zurich on Oct 12 arid 24 
from 9 to 1 1:30 a.m. Call 438- 
7823. 

Immunization clinics 

The Lake County Hcalthv 
Dept offers immunization, 
clinics for Lake County, chil-' 
dren at the following Idea- 1; 
tions:. Lake County. Health 

• Dept. Belvidcre:; Medical ■ 
Bldg., 2400 Belvidcre Rd;i\ 
Waukegan 'every; Monday - 
from 1 to 3 p.m.;; Tuesdays 
from ,8 ; to 10 .a.m.;- and 
Thursday from 1' to 3 p. hi- No . 
appointments are necessary. 
Trinity Lutheran Church, 

"25519 W. Hwy. 134, Inglesldc 

^bn Oct J2'frbm9 to 11 am . 
No appointment neccssaryi.: 
VFW Post 4551, 75 North 
Ave., Antioch on Oct 19 from ~ 
9 to 1 1 a.m. No appointment 
necessary. 

American Legion Post ; 

: 867, : Rtes. 176, 60 and 83, 
Mundeleln on Oct 26 from 9 
to 1 1 am. No appointment 
necessary^ .v . : -: '^ij\ 



Vic iou\ 






Mobile health 

The Lake County Health 
Dept. Mobile Health Service 
will be at the following loca- 
tions: Warren Twp. Citizens 



Hos|)ii\l 



Alcoholics anonymous 

Support group; meets 
ieycry Wednesday at ;7 p-nV 
and Friday at 8 p.nt; Call 
360-4090 for information; 



Narcotics anonymous 

• Meets every Monday at ft 
p.m., at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan. No registra- 
tion required. Call 360-4090; 



Cocaine anonymous 

, ^Support group. : meets 
every Saturday at 7:30 pim; 
Call 360-4090 for informa- 
tion. 



AIATttjV 

:^- Support^ group for chil-" 
dren ages 5 throu^i 1 Imcets 
every Wednesday at 7 p.m. 
Call 360-4090. ' v 



ComIiII Mitlicxl 

C I Ml ft 



Caregivers support 

CondeU Medical Center's 
Caregivers Support Group 
will meet at 7 p.m., the fourth ■ 
Tuesday ,bf every ; month, at 
the All en Con d e ! I Day Center 
for fntergeneratiohal Care in 
Libertyvillc.: Anyone who is 
responsible for giving care to 
elderly, infirm, or disabled 
family members is invited to 
attend. Call 816-4584 for fur- 
ther details. 

'Home health care 

Accredited Home Health 

Care ; Services are avail ahl e 

.through: Cbhdcll Medical 

Center. For information, call 

CondeU Medical Center at 






i 



WIIL 



ROCK 




If you're a woman over 35, 

a small investment on your part can insure 

something that's priceless- 

YOUR HEALTH. 

During the entire month of October, we're offering more than half off 
our regular mammogram screening fee in support of Breast Cancer 
Awareness Month. For only $50, you'll receive a mammogram and a 
radiologist's interpretation. The offer is good at both our Gurnee 
Radiology and Vernon Hills Medical Imaging facilities. To make an 
appointment, call: 

855-0102 Gurnee Radiology 680-7530 Vernon Hills Medical Imaging 



LAKE 

FOREST 
HOSPITAL 

M0 North Westmoreland Road • lake Forest, Illinois 60045 • 708-234 




"HOME OF 

YOUR 
DREAMS" 



IN FOXMOOR ESTATES 

LOCATED AT THE 

CORNER OF 

39th AVENUE 

& 109th STREET 

KENOSHA 

Hwy. 1 65, turn South On EZ, 
Kenosha 




NOW 
OPEN 

TO THE 

PUBLIC 

WEEKENDS 

(9/1 7-1 0/1 6) 

1 :00 PM-5:00 PM 



m 



1 CAR CARE Ukcl/wd NcwspApcRS OcrobcR 7, 1994 



FALL CAR CARE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Tidy tips to protect cars 



•Wash your car regularly, one© a 
week, preferably by hand with a soft 
towel or sponge. Do not use detergents 
or scouring pads on painted and vinyl 
surfaces, 

•After washing, thoroughly dry the 
car. Including the hard-to-reach areas, 
with a soft towel or chamois cloth. 

•In.'snowbelt" regions, power-wash 
wheel wells to remove built-up salt- 
laden road deposits, and especially to 
loosen and remove caked mud and to 
open up drain holes. 

•Wax you car at least three times a 
year. 

•Wipe off tree sap, bird dropping, 
bug stains and road tars with a mild 



detergent solution or mineral spirits. Do 
not rub vigorously. 

If bug stains persist, mix a small 
amount of meat tenderlzer In your 
hand and apply to the stain. Wipe 
clean after 10 minutes. 

•Have paint chips treated promptly, 
because even If your car Is protected 
on the Inside metal, chipped paint can 
still make It rust on the outside. A spe- 
cialist can provide an exact match of 
the color and type of paint for your par- 
ticular vehicle. 

•Treat exterior vinyl surfaces with a 
vinyl dressing at least every two months, 
or have a specialist apply a profession- 
al protective product to the vinyl. 




HIGGINS 
AUTO CENTER 




(Formerly Gumee Auto Center) 
34740 N. Hwy. 45, Lake Villa (708) 548-9460 E53 

Serving Gumee, Grayslake, Gages Lake 
Round Lake, Lihdenhurst £ Lake Villa 

•Professional Auto Repair • (ML Truck Rental 
• <g| Certified Techs 'Most Repairs In 1 Day 

•Towing & Road Service 

"LUBr6fL"AND~""" 1 

FILTER r OM 

Expires 10/31/94 



18 




WHEN YOU NEED 
BRAKES, COME TO... 

ttUDAS 



Whether you drive a foreign or dometic car, light truck or van, you can 

depend on Midas for professional service, quality parts and great Midas 

values. At Midas, dependability is the driving forcel 

MIDAS MUFFLER & BRAKE SHOPS 

1950 RT. 83 ROUND LAKE BEACH 708-223-3344 

SHOP HOURS d*u (3JJ S© gg \W\ 

Monday-Thursday .. .7:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 

Friday 7:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. 

Saturday .7:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

COUPON " 




Midas supports technician certification 
through the National Institue for 
Automotive Service Excellence. 



25% OFF 

BRAKE PADS & SHOES 

Famous Midas warranty good at over 
1800 Midas shops across the country. 
SEE WARRANTY TERMS IN SHOP. 
'Off regular price. Discount does not 
apply to other needed parts and 
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Not wM wiv dtm promotions of disoowt*. Ofcr good Mtt coupon only 
. lvougnt(V31/M*tp««oiMlngtMuhK*loni 



COUPON 



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Famous Midas warranty good at over 
1800 Midas shops across the country. 
SEE WARRANTY TERMS IN SHOP. 
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Not witt *B> oft* promofcm or dwointi, 0*1 good «M) mm onh 

*uoyghl(V31/W»tp4i1apj*oaMcU*loc*ni. 




Lake County's Largest 
Chrysler-Plymouth 
Dodge-Dodge Truck 

'^'"-IcKIE 




FOX LAKE. IL 






\-/--' 



Bill MclOe 

r '■ !M - -■ ' 




Would like you to meet 
the service crew... 




Wendy Dobosiewla 
Warranty 

" Administrator 

18 Years Experience 



Paul Reed 

formerly of Sunny side 

Dodge in HcHenry 

2S Years Experience 



Ed Ahrens 

Parts 

Manager 

/ 7 Years Experience 




Back Row: Rick, Gene, Brian, Jim, Bob. 
Front Row: Hike, Dave, Brennan, Dave & Bill. 

Combined experience of over 100 years 



Paul invites his old friends to stop in 
and say "hi" and looks forward to 
making many new ones. 

* 

Be sure to give Paul or Wendy a call 
to take advantage of these service 
specials or to set up an appointment. 

STOP IN AT SANDY McKiE - EXPERIENCE COUNTS/ 






While You're Doing Your Fall Home ~~ ^ 
Maintenance, Don't Forget To Get Your Car 
Or Truck Into Great Running Condition 
For Fall Too! 



I 



Wheel Bearing 
Repack 

•Repack bear ings (non-driving axle) and install 
new grease scats if needed. 

•Inspect front pads/rear linings 

DOOOE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 

ONngo«4t>flughlW1S/M Prtwrttetconi*«ne(difliBffl«iCwntbt 
mi m t> tnf nfmi t4*«n of ip*otf« T«m nn reWtd 





Engine Maintenance* 



Tune- 



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4 Cylinder '40. 

6 Cylinder '51.02 

$ Cylinder '64.00 
MopaCtarapion tpuk piufi 
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DODOE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 



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I 



OcTobu 7, 1994 UMkk\ Ncwsp«|>tm BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Leo Leonard Swederski 

Age 78, a resident of Richmond, IL for the past four 
years and a former longtime resident of Ingleside, IL 
died Wednesday, September 28, 194 In his home. He 
was born In Velonla, Arkansas on January 28, 1916 to 
WUllam and Josephine (nee Jablowicz) Swederski. Mr. 
Swederski was a carpenter by trade and was a member 
of the Carpenters Union Local #10. 

Survivors Include five sons Gerald (Carol) Swederski 
of Stockton, CA, Robert (Diane) Wilson of Fox River 
Valley Gardens, William (Pat) Wilson of Paddock Lake, 
WI, Ronald (Lynea) Swederski of Round Lake, IL and 
Leonard' (Pat) Swederski of Richmond, IL; four daugh- 
ters Gerald ine (Harold) Melton of Burlington, WI, Sue 
Garfield. of. Northbrook, IL, Pat (John) Brechel of 
Richmond, IL and Sharon (Jim) Caulfleld of Montcllo, 
WI; two brothers Herman Swederski of Chicago, IL and 
Peter (Beverly) Lewadowskl of Chicago, IL; two sisters 
Betty (Bruno) Gerarde of Palatine, IL and Agnes 
Swiderski of Fox Lake, IL Numerous grandchildren and 
great grandchildren as well as other relatives survive. He 
was preceded in death by his late wife Emily Mary 
Swederski In 1991; two grandchildren Rhonda and 
Ronnie Swederski; two great-grandchildren Dana 
Brechel and Cassldy McCauley, one nephew Skipper 
Gatschet and by two brothers George and Irving 
Gatschet. 

Friends of the family called from 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday, 
October 2, 1994 at the K.K. Hamsher Funeral Home, 12 
N. Pistakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL (The Chapel on the 
Lake). Funeral services were conducted on Monday, 
October 3rd at the Grace Lutheran Church, 10900 Main 
Street, Richmond, IL at 10:00 a.m. with the Rev. Terry A. 
Dufur officiating. Interment was at Wlndrldge 
Cemetery, Cary, IL. For information call (708) 587-2100. 

Jacob "Jake" E. Stoffel 

Age 92 of McHenry, IL died Friday, September 30, 
1994 at Sunset Manor Nursing Home In Woodstock, IL. 
He was born November 26, 1901 in McHenry, the son of 
John and Mary Buss Stoffel. He was married to Matilda 
"TUIle* Miller on September 16, 1930 iri McHenry. A 
butcher by trade, he owned and operated Staffers Store 
on Main Street In McHenry from 1944 to 1956. Following 
that, tie was a plumber's helper in McHenry for five 
years. He worked as a scale-operator atTheien Sand and 
Gravel from 1962 to 1975. He was a founder and mem- 
ber of McHenry Gun Club. He was an avid duck carver, 
fisherman and hunter. He was a great one for hunting 
for arrowheads. He loved to spend hours with the grand- 
children. 

He is survived by his wife Tlllle; a daughter Mary 
Ann "Bunny" (Vern) Thelen of Spring Grove, IL; nine 
grandchildren Jack (Debbie) of AnUoch, Mary Beth 
(Robert) Varak of North Riverside, IL, Susan (Warren) 
Schumacher of Ingleside, IL, Thomas (Paige) of Twin 
Lakes, WI, Peter of Antioch, IL, Steven (Diana) of 
Antioch, IL, Ann (Ross) Berry of Lisle, IL, Barbara of 
Naperville, IL, Margaret "Peggy" (Thomas) Miles of 
WUdwood, IL; a sister Marion Thurlwell of Morton 
Grove, IL; a brother John (Fern) Stoffel of Geneva, IL He 
was preceded in death by an infant daughter; seven sis- 
ters Frances Garner, Martha Stoffel, Laura Uecker, Vera 
. Ford, Emily Miller, Adele Wamer, Lillian Dlemer; and by 
two brothers Paul and George Stoffel. 

Funeral mass was at 10:30 a.m. Monday, October 3, 
1994 at St. John the Baptist Church in Johnsburg with 
Rev. Fr. Robert Balog officiating. Interment was in St. 
John Church Cemetery. Memorials may be made in his 
name to the Johnsburg Rescue Squad. 





Linda Pierce 

October 7, 1989 

Wc love and miss you. 

You ore in our hearts and 

memories. Thank you for 

all you did for us. 

You are a treasure. 

Love, 

The Pierce Children,. 
Your Brother Leon Geng 
and Horn D. Geng 



il 






Darlene Faye Fisher (Welty) 

" Age 49 of Round Lake Heights, IL (formerly of 
Montour Falls, NY) passed away on September 25, 1994 
after a lengthy Illness. She was bom on June 9, 1945 in 
Montour Falls, NY and was employed as a Receiving 
Clerk at the Navy Exchange Warehouse, Great Lakes, IL 

She Is survived by her husband Henry; a son John 
(Connie) of Vernon Hills, IL; a daughter Tracey of Round 
Lake Heights, IL; three grandchildren Kim, Kelly, and 
John Russell Fisher; her parents Norman and Eris Welty 
of Montour Falls, NY; two brothers Darrcll and Dale; and 
a sister Vicky. 

Memorial services were held on Friday, September 
30, 1994 at 10:00 a.m. at the Marsh Funeral Home, 1521 
Washington St. , Waukegan, IL followed by Interment in 
the Ft. Sheridan Military Cemetery. Visitation was at 
Marsh Funeral Home on Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 
The family requests that In lieu of flowers, donations be 
made to the American. Arthritis Foundation 
(Scleroderma Research) or the American Cancer Society 
(Breast Cancer Research). 

Frances M. LaPlant 

Age 80 of Antioch, IL passed away Sunday, October 
2, 1994 at her home. She was born June 11, 1914 in 
Chicago,- IL the daughter of the late Frank and Ella • 
(Lewis) Evans. She had lived In Chicago, IL before mov- 
ing to Antioch in 1959. Mrs. LaPlant was a former mem- 
ber of the Bryn Mawr Community Church In Chicago, 
IL She was a member of the Antioch Womens Club, a 
Board member* of the Antioch Mental Health 
Association and a member and first president of the 
• Antioch Worhens Golf League. On July 22, 1959 she mar- 
ried Homer LaPlant In Chicago, IL. 

Survivors Include, her husband Homer; one sister 
Jane Evans of Batavla, IL; one brother-in-law Jim 
McKinzle; one nephew Dave McKinzie of Crete, IL and 
three nieces Jane Anne Franson, Nora Laughlln, both of 
' Crete, IL and Judy Holzer of Lansing", IL She was pre- 
ceded in death by one sister Eleanor McKinzle. 

Funeral services were held at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, 
October 5, 1994 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main 
Street (Rte. 83), Antioch, IL with the Rev. Vincent 
Eckholm of St Ignatius Episcopal Church In Antioch, IL 
officiating. Interment was In Hillside Cemetery, Antioch, 
IL Friends called at the funeral home from 4 until 8 p.m. 
on Tuesday. 

Yida R. Schumteson 

Age 86 of Taylor, Nebraska; formerly of Antioch, IL 
passed away September 24, 1994 at Valley County 
Nursing Home, Ord, NE. She was born July 18, 1908 in 
Loon Lake, Antioch Township. She was the daughter of 
the late John and Agnes (Sundby) Palmer and lived in 
Antioch until 1989 when she moved to Taylor, NE. Vida 
was a member of the United Methodist Church of 
Antioch and a 1926 graduate of Antioch Community 
High School. 

Survivors Include two sons Lad (Lenka) of Boulder, 
CO and John (Mary Ellen) of Taylor, NE; one brother Les 
Palmer of Antioch, IL one sister Phyllis (Ray) Maaske of 
Bristol, WI; and five grandsons Arnold, Aric, Todd, Buck 
and Drake. 

A memorial service will be held at 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, October 12, 1994 at the United Methodist 
Church of AnUoch, IL Interment will be private at 
Liberty Cemetery, Salem, WI. Those desiring may make 
contributions to the Valley County Nursing Home, Ord, 
NE 68862 in her memory. 



W 






Justen's Round Lake 

222 North Rosedale Court* 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

708/546-3300 

Our full-service Funeral Home offers: 
•pre-arrangement planning 
•pre-funded funerals 
•traditional services 
•contemporary services 
•customized services 




Funeral Director and Owner 

Mark L. Justen 



George H Justen & Son Funeral Home 

3519 West Elm Street, McHenry 



Justen's Wonder Lake Funeral Home 

761 1 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake 




Death Notices 



ARNDT 

Thomas E. Arndt, 52, of 

Fox Lake, IL. Arr: K.K. 

Hamsher Funeral Home, 

Fox Lake, I L 

BODAM 

James Bodam, 79, of 

Round Lake, IL Arr: 

Salata Funeral Home, 

North Chicago, IL 

BROWNE 

Madallne T. Browne, 74, 

of Third Lake, IL Arr: 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 

CAHLSEN 

Selmer Carlsen, 88, of 

Antioch, IL Arr: Strang 

Funeral Home, Antioch, 

IL • 

CLAUSEN 

Evalyn Pester Clausen, 77, 

of Grayslake, IL Arr: 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL 

DRZYMALA 

Genevieve C. Drzymala, 

87, of Round Lake Beach, 

IL Arr: Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslake, IL 

DUCHARME 

Joseph A: DuCharme, 66, 

of Llbertyville, IL Arr: 

Marsh Funeral Home, 

Gurnce, IL. 

DEMBWSU 

Gloria M. Demblnskl, 72, 

of Round Lake Park, IL 

Arr: Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslake, IL 

PIANT1NE 

Daniel ]'. Piantine, 22, of 

Mundeletn, IL . Arr: 

Kristan Funeral Home, 

Mundelein, IL 

PODBORNY 

Raymond P. Podborny, 
64, of Fox Lake.IL Arr. 
K.K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake, IL 



HOGAN 

Francis "Mike" Hogan, 64, 

of Mundelein, IL Arr: 

Kristan Funeral Home, 

Mundelein, IL 

ISTVANEK 

Mary Margaret Istvanek 

(nee Jakubik), 106, of 

Gurnee, IL Am Gurnee 

Funeral Home, Gumee, IL 

KNAPP 

Dennis Ray Knapp, 47, of 

Kildcer, IL Arr. Ahlgrim & 

Sons Funeral Home, Lake 

Zurich, IL 

KUENHOLD 

Alfred H. Kuenhold, 75, of 

Antioch, IL Arr: Strang 

Funeral Home, Antioch, IL 

LANG 

Mae Lang, 72, of Antioch, 
IL Arr: Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch, IL 
UTTERSKI 

Goldie B. Lltterskl, 76, of 
-Lake Villa, IL. Arr. Ringa 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Villa, IL 
LOMBARDO 
Rose Lombardo, 81, of 
Fox Lake, IL Arr: K.K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 
Fox Lake, IL 
MAKI 

Paul F. Maki, 52, of Lake 
Villa, IL An: Ringa Funeral 
Home, Lake Villa, IL . 
MANGI 

Nick D. Mangl, 83, of Lake 
Villa, IL An: Ringa Funeral 
Home, Lake Villa, IL 
MANHART 

Steven S. Manhart, 51, of 
Round Lake Beach, IL Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libertyville, IL 
MCGEE 

Gordon E. McGee, 75, for- 
merly of Lake Villa, IL Am 
Marsh Funeral Home, 
Gurnee, IL 



VOUNO 

Frank Volino, 76, of 
Libertyville, IL Arr: 
McMurrough' Chapel, 
Libertyville, IL 
WIECEK 

Marion Wlecek, 80, of 
Antioch, IL Am Strang 
Funeral Home, AnUoch, IL 

WISNIEWSKI 

Theresa Wlsnlewski, 83, 
of Lake Villa, IL Arr: 
Strang Funeral Chapel, 
Grayslake, IL 

SCHOTANUS 

William Schotanus, 66, of 

Mundelein, IL Arr: 

McMurrough Chapel, 

Libertyville, IL 

SWAN 

John H. "Jack" Swan, 73, 

of Libertyville, IL Arr: 

McMurrough Chapel, 

Libertyville, IL 

TR1TSIS 

Nina L Trltsls, 49, of 

Gurnce, IL Am Marsh 

Funeral Home, Gumee, IL 

O'KEEFE 

Darlene O'Keefe (nee 
Moore), 67, of Ingleside, IL 
Arr. KK Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake, IL 



The Deadline 
for Obituaries 

and 

Death Notices 

is 5 p.m. 

on 
Tuesday. 



K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Ltd. 
offers Forethought A lert Card 



If you're away from home 
and become ill or seriously 
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Emergency personnel can view this information through a special lens 
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The Forethought Alert program is available to you FREE from 
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^■■■^ >*> HiUyWn- At* Vmd0 



J 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone: (708) 587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



fffl BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE Ukcl/vNci Ncws[)A[>ers OcTobc* 7, 1994 




NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOT ICb 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
The Fish Bowl 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 115 Center 
Street, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
. PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Frank H. 
Prohaska, 16931 60th 
Street, Bristol, Wl 53104. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above narjied 
business from the 
looation(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Frank H. Prohaska 
September 21, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
21, 1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Dorothy M, Beer 

Notary Public 

Received: September 21 ,1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994E-167-GL 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
MAG Consultants 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS" 
COUNTY: 522 Kingston 
Blvd., McHenry, IL 60050. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
■ BUSINESS: Michael A. 
Gallln'ati, 522 Kingston 
Blvd., McHenry, IL 60050. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locat)on(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Michael A. Galllnati 
September 21, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
21,1994. * 

. OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Sept. 21, 1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994E-181-FL 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



WEDNESDAY 10 A.M. 

is the deadline for 

classified ads! 
(708) 223-8161 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS ' 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Sunrise Services 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 35 S. Holly, Fox 
Lake, I L 60020. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Robin Ward, 
35 S. Holly, Fox Lake, IL • 
60020. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Robtn M. Ward 
August 29, 1994 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by • the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this August 29, 
1994. ■ 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Elaine C. Spangenberg 

Notary Public 

Received: Sept. 9, 1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-177-FL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Longshot Press 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY:. 35321 N. 
Sheridan Dr., Ingieslde, IL 
60041. 

NAME{6) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PER-SON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Darlene 
Curcio-Elsbury, 35321 N. 
Sheridan Dr., Ingieslde, IL 
60041. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locatlon(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Darlene Curcio-Elsbury 
September 10, 1994 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
10, 1994. 

' OFFICIAL SEAL 

Elsie M. Farris 

Notary Public 

Received: SepL 12, 1994 

Linda lanyzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-169-FL 

September 23. 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that personal, household, and 
misc. items belonging to: 

Walter Novak (Outdoor), 1899 Cedar Lake Rd., Round 
Lake Beach, IL 60073 (1 brown van). " 

Tonya Young (Unit #78), Meadowbrook, Round Lake 
Beach, IL 60073. 

Dennis McGarry (Unit #73-B), 115 Glen St., Grayslake, 
IL 60030. 

Gloria Oliver (Unit #75-A), 145 Glen St., Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

Alan Bauschke (Unit #41), 550 Arbor, Round Lake 
Park, IL 60073 

located at the E-Z Storage Facility, 100 S. Cedar Mound 
Rd„ Round Lake Park, IL 60073 will be disposed of on 
October 8, 1994 at 9 a.m. 0994E-192-RL 

September 30, 1994 
October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
, 1 . Time and Place of Opening of Bids. Sealed propos- 
als for the re-roofing of the Gurnee Police Station of the 
Village of Gurnee, Lake County, Illinois, will be received 
at the Gurnee Police Department, 4587 Grand Avenue, 
Gurnee, Illinois 60031. Said Bids will be received up to 
the hour of 1:00 P.M. on the 14th day of October, 1994. 
Bids will be opened publicly at the Gurnee Police 
Department, 4587 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, Illinois 60031 , 
at 1:00 p.m., October 14th, 1994. 

2. Description of Work. The proposed work consists of 
re-roofing of the Gurnee Police Department 
Administrative area, which Is approximately 100 feet by 
40 feet. 

3. Instructions to Bidders. Copies of the Bidding docu- ■ 
ments may be obtained from the Gurnee Police 
Department located at 4587 Grand Avenue, Gurnee, 
Illinois 60031 on or after Monday, October 3rd, 1994. 

All Bids must be accompanied by a Bidders Bond, 
Certified check, or Bank cashiers check payable to the 
Village of Gurnee for 10% of the total amount of the Bid 
as provided in instructions to the Bidders. 

Not less than the prevailing rate of wages as found by 
the Village of Gurnee or the Department of Labor or 
determined by the court on review shall be paid to all 
laborers performing work under this contract. 

4. Rejection of Bids. The Board of Trustees of the 
Village of Gurnee reserves the right to waive technicali- 
ties and to reject any or all Bids' when the public Interest 
will be served there by. Unless the Bids are rejected for 
good cause, or the contract shall be made to the lowest 
responsible and qualified Bidder. 

Richard A. Welton, Mayor 1094A-206-Gen 

Norman C. Balllet, Village Clerk . October 7, 1994 



public NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
The Village Artisan 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 172 E. Hawley, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Rita B. 
Stanley, 727 Momlngslde 
Dr., Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locatlon(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Rita B. Stanley 
October 3, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this October 3, 
1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E. Toro 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: October 3, 1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

1094A-207-GL 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 

October 21, 1994 



rimuuiMUiiub - 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Two Horse Trading Co. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 36696 Lake 
Rd., Ingieslde, IL 60041; 
Rte. 45 & Rte. 120, 
Grayslake, IL. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Wayne A. 
Carlson, 36696 Lake Rd., 
Ingieslde, IL 60041. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
. This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
locatlon(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Wayne A. Carlson 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
23,1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Beverly McAdams 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Sept. 23, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994E-185-FL 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 

October 14, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
REGARDING CONTEMPLATED 
ANNEXATION OF TERRITORY 

Public Notice is hereby given by the Corporate 
Authorities of the Village of Grayslake, Lake County, 
Illinois, that pursuant to Illinois Municipal Code, Section 7- 
1-13, the Village of Grayslake is contemplating annexa- 
tion of the territory described in Exhibit A generally locat- 
ed on the north side of State Route 120, approximately 
1 ,000 feet west of U.S. Route 45. 

EXHIBIT A 

That part of the North half of the Northeast quarter of 
Section 36, Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the 
Third Principal Meridian, described as follows: commenc- 
ing at a point on the center of the highway known as Old 
Plank Road and which point Is the southeast corner of a 
tract of land conveyed to Morris Erdhelm and Leora 
Erdheim, his wife, by deed dated June 8, 1950, and 
recorded In the Recorder's Office of Lake County, Illinois, 
as Document No. 699396, running thence North along 
the East line of said aforesaid described tract of land con- 
veyed to Morris Erdheim and leora Erdheim, his wife, a 
distance of 726 feet; thBnce East parallel with the North 
section tine, a distance of 410 feet; thence South parallel 
with the East section line, a distance of 726 feet, more or 
less, to the center of highway known as Old Plank Road, 
and thence West 410 feet to the place of beginning, 
(except that part of the North half of the Northeast quar- 
ter of Section 36, Township 45 North, Range 10, East of 
the Third Principal Meridian, described as follows: com- 
mencing at a point on the center of the highway known as 
Old Plank Road and which point Is the Southeast comer 
of a tract of land conveyed to Morris Erdheim and Leora 
Erdheim, his wife, by dedd dated June 8, 1950, and 
recorded in the Recorder's Office of Lake County, Illinois, 
as Document No. 699396, running thence North along 
the East line of said aforesaid described tract of land con- 
veyed to Morris Erdheim and Leora Erdheim, his wife, a 
distance of 300.00 feet; thence East parallel with the cen- 
terilne of said Old Plank Road 62.0 feet; thence South 
parallel with the East line of aforesaid tract of land con- 
veyed to Morris Erdheim arid.Leora Erdheim; his wife, a 
distance of 300.00 feet to the centerllne of said Old Plank 
Road; thence West along said centerllne 62.0 feet and 
except that part of Illinois Route 120 as previously 
annexed), in Lake County, Illinois. 

Said property is wholly bounded by the Village of 
Grayslake, contains less than 60 acres, and is unincor- 
porated. An Ordinance of Annexation of said property will 
be considered by the Board of Trustees of the Village of 
Grayslake. Illinois, at a Village Board Meeting to be held 
on October 18, 1994, at 7:30 p.m. at the Grayslake 
Village Hall, 33 South Whitney Street, Grayslake, Illinois. 
Dated: October 8, 1994. 

Barbara Bacsa, Village Clerk 
Village of Grayslake, Illinois 

1094A-219-GL 
Octobers 1994 



ruBLlC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Mystique Merchant 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1323 
Juneway Terr.,' Round Lake Beach, IL; P.O. Box 547; 
Round Lake, IL. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESSES) OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: Barbara 
Miller, 1323 Jurieway Terr,, Round Lake Beach, IL. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named business from the locations) 
indicated and that the true or real full name(s) of the 
person(s) owning, conducting or transacting the 
business are correct as shown. 
Barbara Miller 
September 6, 1994 

The foregoing Instrument was acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) intending to conduct the business this 



September 6, 1994. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

. LeRoyWIese 

Notary Public 

Received: September 12, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-167-RL 

. September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BID 

The Round Lake Area Park District will receive sealed 
bids for the construction of a maintenance building addi- 
tion located at 751 Hart Road, Round Lake, Illinois. Bids 
will be received by the Round Lake Area Park District 
office located at 814 Hart Road, Round Lake, Illinois until 
3:00 pm (Chicago Time), on Thursday, October 20, 1994, 
and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. 
The project will consist of the following divisions: 
Division I - Concrete 
Division II - Masonry 
Division III - Carpentry 
Division IV - Plumbing 
Division V- Electrical' 
Division VI - Metal Building Addition 
Division VII - HVAC 
Bidding Requirements,. Contract Documents and 
Specifications may be obtained at the office of the Park 
District, at the above address beginning Monday, October 
10, 1994 for a non-refundable fee of $15.00, 

Contractors for all Contracts must comply with the fol- 
lowing: 

a). "As this construction project is to be federally funded, 
all labor standards and equal opportunity regulations 
win be enforced. 
b). The contractor for this project will be required to 
comply, to the greatest extent feasible, with all 
Section Three regulations pertaining to provision 
of opportunities for training and employment to 
lower income residents of the project area and to 
the provision that contracts for. work in connection 
with the project be awarded to business concerns 
located in, or owned in substantial part by, persons 
residing in the area of the project". : ; 
Not less than the prevailing rate of wages as found by 
the Round Lake Area Park District or the Department of 
Labor or determined by the. Court of Review shall be paid 
to all laborers, workmen, and mechanics performing work 
under this contract 

Each bidder will be required to submit with his 
Proposal, a certified check, a bid bond, bank-cashiers 
check or bank draft, payable to the Round Lake Area 
Park District in the amount of 10% of the total bid, and the 
successful bidders will enter. into a contract, including liq- 
uidated damages provision, and a 100% performance 
and completion bond, and labor and material bond as 
provided in the Instructions to Bidders. 

Any contract or contracts awarded under this 
Invitation to Bid are expected to be funded in part through 
the HUD program for Community Development Block 
Grants. Neither the County of Lake, nor HUD will be a 
party to this Invitation to Bid or any resulting contract. 

The Round Lake Area Park District reserves the right 
to defer acceptance of any proposal for a period not to 
exceed (30) thirty calendar days after the date bids are to 
be received, to reject any or all proposals, and to' waive 
technicalities. Only bids in compliance with the provisions 
of this advertisement and Instructions to Bidders will be 
considered. 

Bidders shall not discriminate against any employee 
or applicant for employment because of race, creed, 
color, sex or national origin. Bidders will take affirmative 
action to insure that applicants are employed and that 
employees are' treated during employment without regard 
to their sex, race, creed, color or national origin. Such 
action shall include but not be limited to the following: 
employment, upgrading, demolition, or transfer, recruit- 
ment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination, rate 
of pay or other forms of compensation and selection for 
training, including apprenticeship. 

The successful bidder shall certify to the Round Lake 
Area Park District that they have adopted a Sexual 
Harassment Policy in compliance with the State of Illinois 
Public Act 87-1257 and supply a copy of this plan to the 
Round Lake Area Park District 

Robert Rolek, Executive Director 
Round Lake Area Park District 
814 Hart Road 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

1094A-220-Gen 
Octobers 1994 



! 






ON- 
323 
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ON- 

3ara 



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>n(s) 

fthe 
the 



3 me 
ithls 
iEAL 

fieso 
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1994 
Hess 
Ilerk 
7-RL 
1994 
1994 
1994 



saled 
addi- 
Bids 
iatrict 
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1994, 
Ud. 



and 

Park 

itober 

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Jems 

irsons 



OcTobm 7, 1994 '\jSt\md NtwspApEW BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




LEGAL NOTICES 



r LtULlC NOTiUc 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE. 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Counter Fitters 
ADDRESSES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 888 E. 
Belvldere Rd, #315, 
Qrayslake, !L 60030. 
.NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

T RANS ACTING 
BUSINESS: Robert E. Del 
Prato, 528 Beechwood 
Dr., Round Lake, IL 
60073. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
• This is to .certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Robert Del Prato 
September 10, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
13,1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Lillian M! Frost 

Notary Public 

Received: September 14, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-174-GL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

' October 7, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Real Estate Specialties 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 801 Lakevlew 
Dr., Round Lake, IL 
60073. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Martin 
Grlmaldi, 801 Lakevfew 
Dr., Round Lake, IL 
60073. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Martin Grlmaldi 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this September 
9, 1994. 

■ OFFICIAL SEAL 

Cynthia I. Olandese 

Notary Public 

Received: September 9, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0994D-162-GL 

September 23, 1994 

September 30, 1994 

October 7, 1994 



fUDLiC NOTICE 

The. Big Hollow School 
District Is accepting pro- 
posals for the construction 
of a parking lot. Information 
may be obtained at the Big 
Hollow School District #38 
central office, 34699 N. 
Highway 12, Ingleslde, IL 
60041 (587-2632) between 
9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Sealed 
proposals are due by 
Friday, Oct. 14. 

1094A-204-Gen 
."■Dr!tnhpr7 1QQd 



fm 



Beratrawnlalm 

Buying, Selling or 

[Finding What You Need!] 

[lakeland Newspapers) 

Classifieds 
|(708) 223-8161I 



LEGAL NOHCE 

PUBLICATION IS EASY AND CONVENIENT 

IN LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

An Invitation is extended to public bodies, attorneys, 
businesses and private citizens to uw the publications of 
Lakeland Newspapers for convenient efficient and eco- 
nomical publication required for Legal Notice by the 
State of Illinois statutes. 
Legal .notices may be placed in person at our centrally 
located business office, 30. S. Whitney St, Grayslake, 
60030, or sent by mail or FAX, 708-223-8810, The tele- 
phone number is 708-223-8161. 
The 13 community newspaper publications of Lakeland 
Newspapers meet all the statutory requirements for 
Legal Notice in Lake County, 111. Our rates are economi- 
cal and our deadline is the latest In Lake County. We reg- 
ularly provide publication service under the tightest time 
restrictions. 

The Lakeland staff is experienced in the unique require 
ments for Public Notice. We are ready to assist with your 
questions and all your. Public Notice needs. For ques 
tions and rate information, please call Chris Kenyon at 
708-223-8161. Let us serve you with Legal Notice publi 
cation, Thank you. 

The Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 



Another 
Satisfied 
Customer! 




Lakeland Classifieds... 

We'll point you 
In Ute right direction! 

To place your ad, contact your 
Classified Ad-Visor today at 

(708) 223-8161 

Lakeland 




Tis 5 months before 

Christmas 

And all through the store 

The clerks are so busy 

You'll need to hire more! 

No need to worry, 

No need to fret, 

Classified 

can get you the best 
sales clerks yet! 




Not lust salesclerks - but all types of skilled people 
can be found fast with a help-wanted ad in classified. 
Call now to place your holiday or temporary help. 
Good people are just a classified ad awayl 

Classified - the answer to 
all your holiday needs! 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
Classifieds 
(708)223-8161 



Classified Ad 
Order Blank 

Word Rate Ads 

15 words '6,25, 1 5e for each additional word (pre-paid) 
15 words 7.25, 15« for each additional word (to be billed) 
(Private Party Only) 

Count words* Phone 
numbers and hyphenated 
words count as one word. 

Write Copy Below: 




1 ' 








* 


Name: 




Address: 


Town: 

Run Ad (date): 


Phone: 



Under What Category 



Enclose check & mall to: 

Lakleland Newspapers 

80S. Whitney St 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

or FAX (708) £23-8810 

We also accept Visa & MasterCard 
For more information, call 

(708) 223-8161 



SHARE YOUR BLESSINGS WITH THE NEEDY 
IMS THANKSGIVING AND WE'LL GIVE YOU A 

FREE CLASSIFIED AD 

Let's make sure no local residents go hungry 

this holiday season. Donate 4 cans of 

food and you will receive a free 

classified ad (25 words or less) 

• No expired, dented or rusted 
cans will be accepted. 

• Cans must have labels. 

• Only Market Guide and 
Transportation ads accepted. 

•Private Party only. 

Drop off your food contribution in person at 
our office between 8am and 6pm, Mon.-Fri. 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, EL 60030 




Food will be donated to 

a local P.A.D.S. Shelter 

in your community. 




CLASSIFIED UkcUNcl Newspapers OtTdta* 7, 1994 



CLASSIFIED 
GUIDE 




.-» ■■>>•. 



Personals 

Auctions ;..........«..«..-.... rt ...Ml30 

Business Personals 135 

Financial i— . 140 

oVlplOyfVibfNT 

Hdp Wanted Part-Time..... 219 

Help Wanted Full-Time '. 220 

Employment Agencies 221 

Business Opportunities ". 225 

Si luaUons Wanted 228 

Child Care....... 240 

School/Instruction .'. 250 

\;v^:;-'..'. , >-.v:.' ; :V:-:'-~ ; ■'<'.■• "■■><•■ >.:••«■•••.•:«•'•-'. ■ .'*•:-:«.'•:•.>''• '.V»: : !S'-- "■' ■■■■:■■ '■/, :J 

MARKET ?^Ou 1C1H ; 

''AiBflqHlS^ H 'u. n »i.;» M MM.H»«««; m 301 

Appliances 304 

Barter/Trade 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 314 

Business/Office Equipment «. 318 

ElcctronlcsAkxnpulers... 320 

llRD IjUJuOl.. H«nimi*HlMUHIHI»IHMHHIIIHMHIIMU1IHtli«liMlJ*l 



Firewood 328 

Garase/Rummagc Sales 330 

Good Things to EaL 334 

Hones & Tick , .". 338 

Household Goods/Fumlture. .-,...340 

Jcwdiy .....344 

Lawn/Garden 348 

Miscellaneous... ......350 

Medical Equip/Supplies » « 354 

Musical instruments « .«.«« 358 

Pcts&Supplles 360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools & Machinery........ 368 

Wanted To Buy. ' 370 



ReaL Estate 



Homes For Sale 500 

Homes For Rcnl 504 

Homes Wanted. 508 

Homes Builders 510 

Condo/Town Homes 514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

Apartments Wanted 524 

Apt/Homes To Share .....528 

Rooms For Rent « 530 

Buildings „ 533 

Business Property For Sale 534 

Business Property For Rent - „ 538 

Investment Property 540 

Mortgage Services ....'. ...544 

Farms - 548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage , 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals 564 

Out of Area Property - 568 

Cemetery Lots «*»- 570 

Real Estate Wanted. 574 

Real Estates Misc. ..... .. 578 

RECREATiONAl 

•Xvxr yy.yyyyyyss.yy. ■'.■'•'■■'.■','. yyyy. : ■;.-'.-.->. •«■ ;•:•.-. .v.- .-.v. ;.-.!*. ■.-.•. *.*;*.• .-.■.•>.• .•»;•.•!•.•.•»•>>/ •>.**•.■. ..*.*.•>.• '.•'•',-.■' 

Recreational Vehicles^ ........ 704 

Snowmobtle/ATV's - 708 

Boals/Motors/Hc «... 710 

Camping -... ...„^.....„.„... 714 

Travd/VacaUon 718 

Sports Equipment. 720 

Airplanes 724 



.'.v.-.\-.v.v.\y.v 



:<•:•:•••: ••:•■•:■:•:•*:•:•: 



IfilANSpORTATiON 



;':>>': : :-v.v>'>>;": : : ; : 

f§i|iP 

■x-'-v,' >tvx»> '-;■',• '.■'■ yyy/.-.-y.-' •'.■',:■'<■' ■.■:■'',■.■ >:•'**• :•*.*.• yyyy. y-yyyy/<-yyyyyy-yyyyyyyyyyyyr-yyyyy//yyy//&y*+Yf* 

Cars For Sale. 804 

Reoial/Leases „ 808 

Classic/Antique Can 810 

Service 4 Parts 814 

Gar Loans/Insurance. BIB 

V 2U5 ......... IHmNHtfMHHIHI HI>in)HIHHIMHIItlMllltHtlllHIM<ftwl 

rOUT WD€CI l/flVC/] C6p$ iMiMiiiiHt>M» • ,,**.,..., tt „.,.,..a£a 

Trucks/Trailers — .: 834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles :... 844 

Wanted To Buy... ....848 

Service Directory 

Appliances Repair 903 

PUBDWQp >■ ■ - "" '■* mm »» JlJO 

Builders S09 

Cirpeoiry ...S12 

CaipetClaalrjg SIS 

CoocreioCeraenL... S18 

Dry Wall S21 

EducaUon/InslnxUoQ ., „ S24 

UvCUICiJ'..... 'i.. ti....... > lU/ 

Rrewood S30 

Handyman..... «... S33 

Heating/Air Condittootog..... S36 

Housekeeping S39 

I JIMTSJ MIHIMf lli m .lll..l.il.1l«.lMI>.lllllMMkl-lt. IIUtlllHtlUU 

Laundry/Qemtng.. ..S45 

|w ft JI JMmW.mlHUlMilMtimiiMitUHHHH Mt*HIMIHHIHh*HHiWM*HM>MO 

MvUjCU BQnDD -i.i "i»J H.ln'i»ii.mi«n.im.'..it»n. &}1 

Moving/Storage. „.,..... S54 

PKnling/Deconttrtg S57 

ParaLepJ/Typtng Services.... „..,..,. SfiO 

Plumbing .'. S63 

Pools :. S66 

Pressure Washing... » S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair S75 

H*V T F <"W ^fi * •■ O/O 

KcSUDJvS tut-n ihiii " * * '*■■> 00 1 

Roofing/Sdiog..... SS4 

„ S87 



Storage, 

Ta Service.. 
Trees/Hats 

Wedding..,.., 
Mlscdbneous Services 



»tl*l*4MII4ll*H 



I.*....,....... 1... ..... ........... .... 



iinNHM<MH««t»Mt«k «t«.tl|f.lttltt« <M 



...S90 
...g3 

..S99 



Twin 
Lakes. 



Richmond 



McHnry 



Crystal 
Lak* 

Mcllciiry 

County 



diSTR.buTION 



Kcnoatin 

Comity 

•Silver Lake n , , . 

^^as^BrtJtoJ^ 






•Kenosha 



•IBBbufTv 




©•wx 

43/mm Wsutagin 



***** ^ Zg ^'^-^ ^^V, 

•Lwg 
' Birrtogtefl 0*w» 



.palatine 



Butlalo Grove 




Metra 
. — ^Milwaukee 
RR 



•Norlhbrook 



Cook tiHiiily 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 15 Newspapers! 

Antioch News-Reporter • Round Lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News • Warren-Newport Press • 
Graysiake Times • Fox Like Press • Gurnce Press • Lindenhurst News • 
Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyvllle News 



CLASSIFIED 



110 


Notices 



110 



Notices 



110 



Notices 



North Chicago Lions Club 

Congratulates our 1994 

50/50 Winners 

Rich Anderson $ 600.°°/Chester Swopes $ 400. M / 
Bernard Semasko ^200.°° 



CASINO NIGHT October 8, 1994 

Sponsored fey North Chicago Ltotu Club 
BERTRAND LANES *oo PM - 2:00 AM 

AtfmistiM %" Brfnf thU Aid f<r %* eff timiuion 




S#I#S#T*EfeR^S# 

S. ilicone 

I. nformation 

$. upport 

T.hrough 

E.ducation 

R.esources & 

S. crvices 

Sisters Support Group Meeting 

November 2, 1994 at 

,. John Hcrsey High School 

1900 E. Thomas, Arlington Heights 

7-9 p.m. in the school cafeteria 

Please come and join us for an evening of learning about the 

affects of silicone in the body, and to have any of your questions 

answered. We will have a format which includes a time for sharing 

information with each other. This will be YOUR support group, 

and you will have input into the group dynamics. 

Attend the first meeting and assist the co-founders in establishing 
the group from its foundation and watch it growl 

We hope to see you on November 2, 1994, and every first 
Wednesday of the month (hereafter. If you have any questions 
please call one of the co-founders. 

Laura ... 708-272-0667 
Steph ... 708-837-6255 
Peggy ... 708-832-0527 

See you on November 2nd... Be there! 



COMPUTER SHOW AND 
SALE. October 9th., 10am- 
3pm. Holiday Inn, 6161 W. 
Grand Ave, Gumee. Save up 
to 60% on new/used hard* 
ware, software, books, CD's, 
parts, supplies, accessories 
and shareware. For more In- 
formaHon call (219) 931-3761 

EARN "$50. In FREE Mer- 
chandise or MORE, just being 
a 'Christmas Around The 
World" hosless. Call Artene for 
Information on specialty gifts 
or Christmas AND catalogs 
loday at (708) 74Q-1384. 

PARENTS- TOUGHLOVE a 

support group for parents ol 
troubled children/teens, 
meels each week, at Round 
Lake Area Park Dlst. room 
114. Located on Hart Rd. 
and Rte.134, Round Lake. 
GET THE SUPPORT 
YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING 
FORI Or call (SO0)S26-K)DS, 
For Informal Ion. 

REWARD! $1,000 for video 
footage or $500 for variable In- 
formation regarding steer 
killed at sherrftf rodeo on Sat- 
urday, September 17, 1994. 
Anonymity guaranteed. (70S) 
552-7672 or (708) 550-6925. 

TALENT SEARCH. Singers, 
dancers, comedians, all types 
of enterlanment. For Irforma- 
tlon call (706)604-1711. 

WANTED 13-MORE PEO- 
PLE TO LOSE UP TO 
30LBS IN 30-DAY PRO- 
GRAM, FOR UNDER 
$100. 100% GUAR- 
ANTEED. OFFER WILL 
END SOON! CALL NOW! 
(709) 360-06M. 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST Incorrect Insertion.' The newspaper will be 
responsible for only the portion of the ad that is in error. 
Please notify the Classified Department in the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that in any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

PAYMENT IN ADVANCE IS REQUIRED FOR THESE ADS: 

•Advertisers out of Lakeland circulation area 

•Business Opportunities 'Mobile Homes 'Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pa fs will bo considered tor giveaway. 

WE ACCEPT: EBf&Si 



ATTE NTION 
CLASSIFIED . 
ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspaper* you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising, lb receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments far your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

hsfcasaai N«wapaa«n 
roBoxaes 

30 •. wTdtaey St. 
Orayslato, IL 00050-0368 



115 


tot&Foaad 



HOW TO PUCE A CLASSIFIED AD 

® ph B o Y n E ... Call (708) 223-8161 




BY 
PHONE ... 

BY 
MAIL ... 



Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Dox 2GB 
Graysiake, IL 60030 



IN 30 S. Whitney St, 

PERSON ... Graysiake 

[r=*l BY FAX... (708)223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line .........Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8am - 8 pm ..: Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm Frjday 



FOUND SEPTEMBER 14 

IN LAKE VILLA AREA MALE 
CHIHUAHUA. CALL (706) 356- 
5954. ^^^ 

FOUND- BLACK KITTEN 
wtth purple collar. Nov Ri. 59 
Cemetary. Call <70e) 
395-2634 to Meraly. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




115 



Lost A Found 



LOST SHOE BOX CON- 
TAINING WOODEN 
SANTA CLAUSES. IF 
FOUND PLEASE CALL 

(708) S87-5SSB. 

DID YOU FIND Someonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get 
your results, FOUND ads 
are RUN FREE of Charge. 
Call (708)223-8161. 



120 


Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN.' For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

FREE COLOR CATALOG 
tor personalized children's 
story books and baby books. 
Each book has name, age, 
town and friends, making your 
child the star. Receive In one 
week. McCarthy's Create-a- 
Book. PO Box 10B5, Linden- 
hurst, III., 60046. (708) 
356-0031. ■ 

GIVEAWAY UP-RIGHT 
PIANO. Works, but does 
need repair. You haul. (708) 
872-3226. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A FREE 
or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads). DeadQnes: 
10am Wednesdays. (708) 
223-8161, ext. 140. 




A BABY TO LOVE! Please 
let us give your baby a warm 
and loving home wflh a bright, 
secure future-full of happi- 
ness, opportunity and enthu- 
siastic grandparents, aunts, 
uncles and cousins. We am 
eager to help you! Wll you 
help us? Please cal Cotoen & 
John (312) 774-1566 COL- 
LECT^ ^^ 

A BABY, A DREAM COME 
TRUE: ADOPTION! Let us 
give your baby the simple |oys 
of family, all the love in our 
hearts, and a happy secure h> 
lure! We are a down-to-earth 
professional couple longing to 
share our Me win chldren. 
Can we welcome your baby? 
CALL LAURA A MARC 
(706) 662-0261 COL- 
LECT! ^^ 

LOOKING . FOR AVON 
PRODUCTS, BUT DON'T 
KNOW WHERE TO BUY 
THEM? CALL LORI-AVON 
INDEPENDENT SALES 

REP. (706) 546-031S. 



125 


Personals 



ADOPTION- ' PLEASE 
HELP. Loving professional 
couple happily married for 14 
years desperately wants to 
complete our family. Our only 
chance Is you. We can fulfill oil 
the dreams you have for your 
precious baby. The baby will 
have a 'lifetime of love and 
happiness and a devoted full 
time Mom and an adoring 
Dad. We live In a beautiful sub- 
urban home wtth lots of kkts - 
and park nearby. We will pro- 
vide an excellent education ' 
and financial security. Confi- 
dential, medical, counseling, 
and court approved Irving' ex- ' : 
penses paid. Please he £ by 
calling bur attorney at 
(708)957-6111. " 

ADOPTION- A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. Dr. Dad and 

creative, at home Mom thank 
you for considering the gift ol 
He. We understand this Is a 
tough time but your concom 
j fins our hearts wfth love and 
hope. Our loving, secure 
home Is Just waling tor the 
laughter of children. Medical, 
legal, counseling, and court 
approved Irving expenses 
paid, Information corrlktentlal. 
Please call our attorney at 
(706)957-6446. 

ADOPTION-TRUST US 

WITH YOUR GREATEST 
GIFT.. Let us help you to give 
your precious baby everything 
you could wish for. N for any 
reason you are unable to raise 
you baby yourself- please 
trust us to fulfil your hopes 
and dreams. Your trust and 
wishes wil be honored. The 
baby w!H have a lletlme of love 
and happiness win a full time 
Mom and adoring Dad. We live 
in a beautiful suburban home 
and wll provide an excellent 
education and financial securi- 
ty. Confidential, medfcal, legal, 
counseling and court ap- 
proved ivlng expenses paid. 
Please let us nek) by callng 
our attorney at (706)957- 
6111. ' 

FINANCIALLY SECURE 
COUPLE wants to adopt 
newborn. Call Debbie and 
Steve collect (706)295-9515. 




K Art You Looking a 

for a Synagogue? 

CONGREGATION 
AMEGH0D 

1 500 Sunset Aw., Wzukegan 

336-9110 
Sites* icnkac (Mas, 7*>pja; 

. Sssjrdsn, 9 nn. 

Sunder School 10 am - boob 

Habnv School In Uaossbunl, 

ftcsJapaihundsji 

3 UP -Spin, jt 






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P 

LEASE 

sslonal 
for 14 
irtts to 
w only 
fulllll all 
or your 
iby wilt 
tre and 
■tod lull 
adoring 
Kul sub- 
ot kids 
will pro- 
ucatlon 
Contl- 
risellng, 
fing'ex^' 
ho^ by 
ay at 



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OcTobsk 7, '*! 9-94- UkclANd N 




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125 



Personals 



125 



Personals 



IF YOU LOVE TO COOK, 
halo to cook, or Just need raw 
Ideas, share a PAMPERED 
CHEF KITCHEN SHOW with 
your (ifondsl It's fun) Call for 
details (312)761-914B. 

NOVENA TO ST. JUDE. 
Oh, Holy St. Jude, Apostto and 
Martyr, great in virtue and rich 
In miracles, near kinsman of 
Jesus Christ, faithful Interces- 
sor of all who Invoke your spe- 
cial patronage In lime of need, 
to you I have recourse from 
the depth of my heart and 
humbly beg "you" to whom 
God has gtvon such great, 
power to come to my assis- 
tance., Hefc) me In my present 
and urgent petition. In return I 
promise to make your name 
known and cause you to be In- 
voked. Say three Our Fathers, 
three Hall Marys and Glories. 
Publication must be promised. 
St, Jude pray for us aJt who In- 
voke your aid. Amen. This No- 
vena has never been known 
to fall. M.Z. 



ADOPT:- A lifetime of hugs, 
kisses and a secure future 
await the baby we adopt. 
Modlcal/legel expenses paid. 
Call Marsha and Dick 1-800- 
314-5433, 

ADOPTION: Wo grow up with 
■mall town value* In large, 
loving families. Wa want to 
adopt a child to love and 
•hare our Ufa. Can we help 
fl*ach other? For more infor- 
mation please call our attor- 
ney Gtenna at 1-800-241- 
6384 or us at 1-800-393- 
1773. Scott and Sara 



135 



Business Personals 



1SSS LUXURY VEHICLE. 

$800/down, $7S/month. Free 
Information LSASE to: Sutton, 
7506 W. 161st, Tlntoy Parte, II. 
60477. 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
' ran- inne 



HAVE . FUN DEMON- 
STRATING Christmas ar- 
ound the wo rid. House of 
Uoyd. Work P/T, earn F/T pay. 
Free kit and training. No In- 
vestment. For more Informa- 
tion call Sheryl (706) 
567^6042. 

LOSERS WANTED! 5 to 
500bs. Fast, Quick and Easy! 
Guaranteed. (7Q6)546-SL1M. 

THOUSANDS PER YEAR 
WITHOUT A SECOND 
JOB 1 $3.00-cash/SASE: E & 
A, 3950 N. Lake Shore Dr. 
#910. Chicago, II. 60613. 

WANTED 77 MORE PEO- 
PLE to Lose up to 30 pounds. 
Programs start under $100. 'If 
you donl need 1o lose 
vwyiii, ■onwortw you ion 
does. (708)223-2517. 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 
$35,000 potential. 
Details. Call (1) 805 
962-8000 Ext. B-4458 



DANCE POUNDS AWAY 

Expanding. Seeks 6:00 ami 
Step/Aero Instructors and] 
Part Time counter help. 

PLEASE CALL 

(708) 662-2772 



TEACIIER 

Needed for Christian 
.after school program 
between 2 and 6 p.m. 

Please Call 
(708)380-9042 



IF YOU UKK A VARIETY 
and are not afraid to get dirty, 
this job is Tor you. Light 
cleaning, light filing, phone 
sod driving. 15-25 hours a 
week. Bl-IIngua] helpful. 
Must have car. $3.5G/hour. 
(708) S46-4S777 



I 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Lake County's fastest grow- 
ing group of weekly newspa- 
pers, Is seeking a 

TELEMARKETING 

SUPERVISOR 

The candidate will be responsl 
ble for a staff of 8-10 part time 
telemarketers, Responsibilities 
Include hiring; training, meet 
tng departmental quotas. 
Hours are M-Th 3-8:30 with 
possible Fridays or Saturdays; 
if you are professional, ener- 
getic, creative and enjoy vari- 
ety, we are Interested in talking 
to you. 
Please send resume or call. 

LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

30 S. Wnftney St, Grayslaka 

(706)223-8161 



I 



Part Time 

HELP WANTED 

Christian Educator 

and 

Custodian 

Please Call 

Antioch United 
Methodist Church 

(708)395-1259 



PRE-PRESS 

[immediate PT opening! 
Ifor evenings. Must navel 
[prior paste-up & proof-l 
treading experience.! 
iSome Desktop publish- 
ing, consisting of IBM] 
Iwindows, PageMaker &l 
lCorel Draw, experience] 
helpful. 

Call Ruth 

after 10 a.m. 

244-7425 




219 



lldp Wanted 
Part-Time 



BOOKKEEPER 

Need monthly and occasional- 
ly to balance checkbooks, 
Computer knowledge helpful 
but not necessary. 

Please Call 
(815)344-8733 
Leave Message 



AG YCl) LOVE 1 
ANIMALS? 

Do you have 2 hours per week to spare? Asslsi 
Animal Foundation, the area's only no-kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work that Is highly rewarding 
and funl We need men and women who: 
: ,?Can work with cats and dogs 
*Do tight repair work 
- "Answer phones and other office duties 

We are located in Crystal Lake 
For more information call. I 

(815) 459-0990 ^ 



pORK PART TIME H0URS| 

| EARN FLUTTMB PAY | 

s Clean model homes || 

i Flexible evening or s 

= very early A.M. schedule. = 

Car necessary 

|CalI (708) 351-62431 

for Interview \ = 

1 

S BANQUET x 
SERVERS 

Good hourly rale 

Varied hours available 
Experience preferred 

'Also Disbwasbers/Busboys 

tws, Coiwimr Squire 
Banquet Facility 

its. 120 A 45, GnysUke, IL 
v (708) 223-3022 * 



HOTEL 

Night Auditor- 
Part-Time 

Immediate opening Friday 
& Saturday nights at 
Executive 'Conference 
Center. Competitive start- 
ing wage. Apply in person: 

HARRISON 

CONFERENCE 

CENTER 

136 Green Bay Road 

Lake Bluff, Illinois 

Please telephone 

708-2 95- J 100, 

extension 27* 



\ 




Food Service . 

Are You Committed, 

Energetic, . 
& People-Oriented? 

Then We May Have The 
Perfect Job For You... 

•DIETARY AIDES* 

Part-Time 

(CornpetWw Wa««/B*rwfrt») 

Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center Is seeking 
flexible Individuals with a 
food .service background 
to work within our me& 
leaf facility. W1U be 
responsible for tray line 
service, delivering food to 
our patients, and other 
various duties within our 
Food Service Department 

For consideration, stop In 
to complete an applica- 
tion: 

Human Resources 
2801 Emmaus Avenue 

Zlon, IL 00090 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



219 



lldp Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
jrnT-iinw - 



219 



ParMime 



220 



Help Wanted 

FullrTlme 



Inventory' 
Taker 

npeded in 
.Vernon Hills area. 
. Flexible hours 
$6,25 starting pay. 

For information call: 

MIS Inventory 
Specialist 

^(708) 253-1173' 



DELIVERY 
WORK 

Needed for Mondays 
and/or Tuesdays, 

Car and dependability 

a must. For" more 

information call 

(708) 223-8161 

Ask for Bob Schroeder 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



LUNCH & DINNER 
WATT STAFF 

Fine dining experience 

preferred. Must be 

pleasant and dependable. 

Apply in tenon 

Tuti.-Sun. after 1030 a.m. 

* * + * * 

Country Squire 
Restaurant 

Rts. 120 & 45 
Grays! ake 

(708)223-0121 



•J iiinHiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiiiniUHiiiininT E 



Clerk Typist 

CenComE9-l-l 

Emergency Telephone System 

Soiled Word Perfect, light fil- 
ing, 20 hours a w«k, may fie* 
hours. $7-57 S3 hour depending 
on qualifications. Applications 
are available at 

911 Lotus Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

(708)270-9111 

EOE 



aiiiiiiiniiniiiimnitiininiiimiiiliiir, 



P CLERICAL Q 

(MWley Horn) 

Duties Include general 
clerical .work - and 
answering phones -as 
well as shipping & receiv- 
ing. Experience helpful. 
Non-smoking office. 

Apply at: 

Illinois InttnimcntB 

27840 W. Concrete Dr. 

Ingleslde, IL 60Q41 

*\ (815) 344-6212 



RESIDENTIAL 
CLEANING 

Port TimeJFull Time 
Top Pay! 

$7.25-9.25 per hr. 
Dependability a must. 
Nice daytime hours. No 
weekends. Must have tell- 
able Insured transporta- 
tion. Wauconda, Island 
-Lake, Harrington area. 

Call Greg between 
7'Sfp.m. weekdays 

(708)487-2557 



Sat. & Sun. 

i 

1/2 hour am & 1/2 hour pm 
Assist wife (stroke) 
Go to bed, get up. 
Good pay. ■ 

Wauconda 






Call 



(708) 526-2281 



n 



For appointment 



Ei 



c! 



Part Time 
MAHROOM 

Mondays and Tuesdays 
in our Grayslaka office. 
Perfect for retirees, mar- 
ried couples or someone 
wanting to pick up a little 
extra money. 

Call Bob Schroeder 
(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



BP 



• HOUSEKEEPERS * 

part time 

Must be able to 

work weekends 

and holidays. 

COMPANY 

BENEFITS APPLY 

Apply in Person 

Best Western 
Regency Inn 

350 Route 173 
Antioch 



^ 



mimic 



Super 



K 



Center 



\ 




(OPEN 24 HOURS) 

ONE STORE ONE STOP 

ONE GREAT IDEA 

We are looking for applicants lor positions In ihc following areas: 

Part Time 
•UTILITY CLERKS 
•GROCERY STOCK 
•CUSTOMER QREETERS 
•FASHIONS 
•DELI SERVICE 
•AUTO SERVICE WRITER 
•CHECK-OUT SERVICE FTorPT 

•FOOD COURT FTorPT 

Experienced 

•CAKE DECORATOR FTorPT 

•SEAFOOD 

We Encourage Applications From All Interested Senior 
Citizens A Students Wanting Full or Part-Time Employment 

EXCELLENT STARTING WAGES AND BENEFITS 

APPLICATIONS WILL BC TAKEN AT: 

413 N. Milwaukee) Ave. 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

, Apply at the Layaway Dapartmant 

Mom-Sat 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

In the Interest of safety and to promote a safe production work 
environment K-Mart stores conducts a p reemployment drug test. 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. • 



Earn Up To v.*. 
$15 per hour 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Complete training, 

paid holidays, 

flexible part- time 

hours. 

Call 
Bob or Aim 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspaper* 



BOBSBBBBBBHHHBSn' 

S PHOTO fj 

§ STRINGERS » 

D Lakeland Newspapers rj 
Dhas openings on Its [J 
{{expanding editorial^ 
d staff for photon 
D stringers. Will handle a a 
|j variety of assignments.™ 
El Must have a reliable rj 
Dear, camera equipment^ 
Band be able to works 
c under deadline situa-rj 
Etions. For interview!! 
g appointment contact [J 
w ToddHeisler a 
c Photographer a 

| (708)223-8161 3 

BBBBQBBByBBBBHaa 



DO YOU ENJOY 
WORKING WITH 

ANIMALS? 

We ar3 seeking a 

permanent; qualified 

person for five hours 

dally Moa-Fit Must 

love animals, anfmdl 

experience helpfuL 

Cleaning, some 

phone work and 

routine medication 

with dogs and cars 

In a cheerful no kill- 

facility Call 

815-459-0090 

9 am - 5 pm 



DELIVERY | 
WORK 

Lakeland Newspapers 
has openings in our 
circulation department 
on Thursdays and 
Fridays.- In this job, 
you will deliver copies 
of our papers to local 
merchants. A car is 
required and you must) 
be extremely depend-l 
able. Ideal for a retired 
person. Contact 
Bob Schroeder at 
(708) 223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
Grayaiake, IL 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MAR K WHH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



NEED YOUNG MAN WITH 
CARPET REPAIR EXPERI- 
ENCE, for International fran- 
chise deartlng company. Pride 
In workmanship a must.- (708) 
940-0300. 

WORK FULL-TIME, EARN 
GREAT MONEY (AVER- 
AGE 322 PER HOUR), 
SET YOUR OWN HOURS 

AND HAVE FUN! Join Wick- 
er Plus, Ltd - Call Lynn 
f70SM87-39O3 for details 

LOO' HOME DEALERSHIP! 
Unlimited earning potential) 
Part/Full -time. Loads/training. . 
Models from 914,904.00. 
Brentwood Log Hornet, 427 
River Rock Blvd., Murfreei- 
boro, TN 37129. 800-264- 
LOGS|5fi47) 

ATTENTION DRIVER TEAMS 
« 15,000 IN BONUS Paid 
monthly, quarterly &* yearly 
PLUS TOP MILEAGE PAY 
401 (K) Plan. tEOO SIGN-ON 
BONUS . Other paid benefits. 
•Vacation -Health and Life • ' 
Dead Head -Motel/Layover- 
Loadlng & Unloading. COVE- 
NANT TRANSPORT 1-800- 
441-4394. Sotot and rtu- . 
denU welcome. . 

WHY ARE WE #1? WE CARE 
ABOUT YOUI Galney Trans- 
portation of Indiana hat Im- 
mediate openings for experi- 
enced OTR Driver*. Family 
values, great benefits. Call 1- 
800-738-0708. 

DRIVERS AVERAGE OVER 
42000.00/MONTH - J.B. 
HUNT offers training assis- 
tance to become a profes- 
sional over the road driver. 
You'll not only earn great pay 
and comprehensive benefits, 
you'll be offered a variety of 
travel, freedom and inde- 
pendence. Call 1-800-2JB- 
HUNT for more information. 
EOE/Subject to drug screen. 

DRIVERS & OWNER OPERA- 
TORS - Grow with a com- 
pany on the move-Fox Mid- 
west Transport, Inc. Offers 
you. *No East Coast 'Home 
Weekly 'Quarterly Bonuses. 
800-333-2268. 

DRIVERS - OTR COMPANY, 
TEAM, OWNER/OPERATORS 
& DRIVING SCHOOL 

GRADUATES. EXCELLENT 
PAY ' & BENEFITS. NEWER 
CONVENTIONALE. PAY 

BASED ON EXPERIENCE.. 
REGULAR. HOME TIME. 
WEST SIDE TRANSPORT 1- 
• 800 : 3732957 X.I 83. 

Driver/OTR... Singles 
37d/mi., Teams - 20a 
each/ml. Late Model Conv. 
Equip, Great Benefits) Driving 
School Students Welcome. 
Great Coastal Express 800- 
444-4929 ext. 6604 



PART-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 26 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career in the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

•Pension Opportunities 
"Discount Shopping Prhrleges 
# Pald Training 
'Educational Benefits 
*Free Uniforms 
*0ne Weekend a Month 
*Two Weeks per Year 
*N0 BOOT CAMP 

This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

^ For more information: 
Rich Hoffman 




RiSEnTc 708-688-3773 






DRIVER-GET MORE FOR 
YOUR MILES! OTR/Shorthaul 
opportunities, home weekly 
Ishorthaul), assigned trucks, 
great benefits, $750 experi- 
enced sign-on bonus; BUR- 
LINGTON MOTOR CARRIERS: 
1-800-JOIN-BMC. EOE. 



NOW 
HIRING 

•Servers "Cashiers 
•Kitchen Staff 

At Boston Chicken you'll 
enjoy: 
•Outstanding Pay Rates »A 

clean and Energetic 

Environment •Great People 

•Flexible Shifts -Full Time & 

Part Time Positions 



Kit I l\M It I I 



'Or KV^ 



Come In lor an Interview 
Monday-Saturday 9am-5pm 

WAUKEGAN 

919 N, Greenbay Road 
(1 Block North ol Grand Ave.) EOE 

Stop by our 

OPEN HOUSE 

Mon-Sat, 9am • 5pm 

Hampton Inn 

5550 Grand Ave. 

Suite 141 

Gumee 

(1 Block West ol Great America) 

(708)662-1100, Ext. 141 

EOE 





CLASSIFIED LaI(eIancI Newspapers Ocxoben 7, 1994 




220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



I Mp Wanted 
M-Tlmc 



Hair Stylist 

CostCuUcr/Mundclcin 

Call Silvio 
(708) 566-7307 

-♦WAREHOUSE*- 

Growing, dynamic NW Sub 
company needs high-energy 
individual to pick and pack 
orders in pleasant working 
environment. Attention to 
detail and excellent atten- 
dance required. Mechanical 
aptitude a plus. Great 
opportunity for someone 
looking to get involved with 
a small company. $7/hr to 
start and full benefits, 
including health ins. and 
profit sharing; Come in to 
fill out an application at: 

William Frick & Co. 

730 Forest Edge Dr. 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

(Corporate Woods 

@ Rtcs 21 & 45) 



| MECHANIC | 

= Diesel & Cm g 
| (708) 526-0858| 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiif. 



WAREHOUSE 

We have an entry- 
level position In our 
warehouse. Ideal 
candidate will have 
the ability to lift up to 
70 lbs, be self-moti- 
vated, organized, 
and Unow how to 
drive a fork lift. 

Apply In person 

MorvFrt. 

between 

Sam and 5pm 

Nil-Way Speaker 
Products, Int. 

945 Anita Ave. 
Antfoch, IL 60002 

EOE 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Local company needs professional Business 
Manager to be part of the Management team. This 
person will be responsible for all accounting activi- 
ties, i.e., billing, closings, payroll, taxes, receivables 
and payables. You will assist in the preparation of 
annual operating budgets. This position reports 
directly to the General Manager. 3-5 years of 
accounting and computer experience with an 
Assodate Degree in Accounting or related field. 
Please call (708) 336-7900 to set an appointment. 

EOE 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



• POSTAL JOBS • 

I Opening! In Winds and nation 
Iwido. Entry level pay starting 
[at S12.68/TV. Call Sun. through 
[pfl. only for employment Infor 
Inflation and application. 

1-818-506-5354, ext 536 



6 CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL/ * 
DAYCARE • 

Need* Full Time 
Teacher A$*Utant 

mmvmmmmm 

PIcomc call Drill 
K g (7QB) 2G505U0 g i> 



SHEET 
METAL SHOP! 

Seeking a responsible 
person, with experi-,, 
ence, to set up and! 
operate a MADA CNC. 

Also need dependable | 
person for general fac- 
tory. Manufacturingjl 
knowledge a plus. 

• Please Call 

(708)473-10421 



a RECEPT10NIST L 

Busy Waukcgnn based 
medical practice seeking 
receptionist with previous 
medical office experience 
to work In our Fox Like 
location. Must be flexible 
with hours. Qualified can- 
didates should have excel- 
lent communication skills 
and some experience with 
computer and Insurance. 

Mall or Fax your Resume to 
Rcnce Horton 

The Eve 

Care Center 

2424 Washington* 

Waukcgan,IL 60085 

Phone (708) 244-2176 

fl Fax (708) 244-5122 17 



■■■■■■■! 



I ■■■■■• I 



Immediate openings (of full-lime OTR seml-driveri. Must meet DOT requite- ■ 

mentj, hive CDL & good driving record. Minimum age 21, 2 yn. exp. pre- ■ 

ferred. Mileage pay, paid pick-ups & deliveries. Ql Safety Bonus, Medical Ins. ■ 

No East Coast late model Pete. Conventional*'. Call for application. 

PRYOR TRUCKING, INC. 

! (414)889-8534 (800)336.8534 Z 



BIG BUCKS FOR COLLEGE! 

High School Jr's, Sr's and College grads, looking for 

a way to go to College? The Illinois' Army National 

Guard will pay 100% of your tuition to any state of 

Illinois college or university. You could get Great 

part-time pay and qualify for the Montgomery G.I. 

Bill. For more information call your local Recruiter or 

1-800-OK-GUARD 



Illinois 




NATIONAL 

GUARD 



Americans At Their Best 



220 



Help Wanted, 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted I 
Fall-Time , 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fulj-Time 



DENTAL RECEPTIONIST/ 
mm MANAGER 

Friendly Gray«lnkc 
office looking for expe- 
rienced pcrnon. Full 
time but hours flexible. 

(708)223-7799 



BnaxBBxmzD® 



MIMICAL 
KILLER 

Requires working 
knowledge of CPT 
and ICD9 coding. 

Please Reply 

Laurie Anderson 

207 S. Milwaukee 
JUke Villa, IL6004C, 



Olllce Clerical 



DRAFTSPERSON 

Industrial Oven or t 
Furnace Experience 

Wc are a leading manufac- 
turer of Industrial ovens 
and furnaces. We have an 
excellent opportunity for 
an Individual with a mini- 
mum of 3 years experience 
In sheet metal drafting In 
industrial ovens, furnaces, 
or related fields. We offer a 
competitive salary, com- 
prehensive benefit program 
and profit sharing. 

Please call or 

send resume to: 

A.E. Luther 

GUlHl GRIEVE CORPORATION 

500 Hart Road * Round Lake 
(708) 546-8225 



Developmental 
Trainer 

Full time, entry loyel, 
willing* to train indi- 
viduals with develop- 
mental disabilities, in 
skills, oral hygiene, 
domestic, pre-work 
and community. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount .■.' 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 




around 11,000,000 



© 



They make the call, 



At Ameritech, customers 

arepauamouni^ meet bur 

commitment to 100% customer 

saUs^action, : vye are seeking 

highly motiyaied,- friendly people to 

join our team as: 



DIRECTORY ASSISTANCE 
OPERATORS y 

Full Time Term Positions 
r . (UptoLyear) 

Ameritech operators provide Information to 
callers requesting business, government or resi- 
dence telephone numbers. Customer contact 
' experience is required. 

Ameritech offers complete training 
and competitive compensation. These 
positions are conveniently located i'/f 

In yourarea. For immediate attention, USi 

give us a call TODAY! 

AMERITECH JOB LINE 
1-800-966-3241 Ext EAC-BLX 

Ameritech Representatives are available to 
speak with you 7 days a week from 7am to 1 1pm 
CST. Pre-employment testing will be scheduled 
for qualified candidates. 





eritech 



Ameritech - an equal opportunity employer 



Restaurant 






I " A -SI A |7 



PvvT 



oin Uur I earn! 



What's So Great About 
Earning Up To 

VERNON HILLS 



at r <?/«jj j/</&» Art 30 &w»J 



/SffS-/99t 



r 
I 



Company:. 
Phone: . 



NAME _ 
ADDRESS 
CITY 



GREAT BENEFITS I Company 

• Affordable Medical • Great 401 (K) I <*«: 

•Flexible Hours •Fun, Friendly Environment 
•One On One Training • Free Uniforms •Meal Discounts •AndMore! 

•Customer Service For Dining Room | 

•Order Takers •Cashiers • Counter Help •Food Runners 

•Line Cooks •Management Opportunities | 

At "Portlltos we believe that you are our only customer contact person. You handle our 

money and our customers so you should get the payi We also treat you as the responsible \ 

person that you are. We realize that parenting and schooling take first priority and 

treat you with the respect you are due. Forget all the fast food/retail horror stories, 

come Join us and find out why we're different from the restl Vue to tremendous 

sales growth, we are looking for year round help to fill positions in our company. 

These positions offer very flexible hours for weekdays, evenings and/dr weekends. 

Perfect Full/Part Time Jobs For Mams, Dads, 'Retirees, Students - 

Anyone Looking To £arnl 

Complete the application to the right, send or bring It In, or call for an 

appointment after Zpm. £Q£ 



Per Hour? 

HELP WANTED MINT APPLICATION 

Bate 

Posirirm: 



""I 



Position. 



PHONR 



STATE 



_ZTP_ 



MUST BE 16 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY 
□ FULL TIME qPARTTIME 

I Q DAYS QNIGHTS 

I HOURS AVAILABLE TO 

j WORK: - 

_ PLEASEnLLOUTTHISMMAffANDBEnJBNTODAYUl 
| PORnLLO 1 SHOT DOGS- BARNELLIS PASTA BOWL 

| 708-367-7290 708-367-1856 

| 221 E. To wnline Road, Vernon Hills 

•••Optional* 



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3 



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OcTobcR 7, 1994 UldANcJ Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




Help Wanted 
FnU-Thnc 



220 



Help Wauled 

Fail-Time 



ASSEMBLER 

For heivy Induslriil equipment 
Must read blueprints itw lumhh 
own look Ted required. 

A&plyjo.: 

American 
Process Systems 

3815 Grandvllie Avenue 
'.: Gurnet, IL 60031 

Phone: 708-336-2444 



Social Services 

*PHOQRAM DIMCTOR* 

(For South Bent, Indium) 

Imnwf. FT opening lor professional 
for above position. RespcroibllrtJas 
Ird. day-today operaUona of Group 
Home, compllanc* w/lCFTVH stan- 
dards. Staff Develpm't & Budget 
Mgmt Supervisory & Group Home 
eip. • plus. Starting tat. Is 525,760 
plus exe, twni. Incl'dg pd 
neartVdanal.'Sertd resume w/cover 
letter to: H.R. Dir., DUNQARVIN 
INDIANA. INC., 1441 E. 84th PI., 
MerrMlle, IN 4e410, E.O.E. Position 
Open Until Riled. 



SI 



® 



For full -rime and part- 
ttm* Job*, Evening* 3-11 
pm at .our but/ conve- 
nient stow. Bsnsfltt 
Inehids 

-NW Vacation 

'MacHcal 

'Ufa buMraiK* 
Ca a for mors Information 




Shell 



1 



• General Warehouse 

• S hi p p i ng/Recei ving 
•Picking & Packing 

•inventory 
•Assembly 

•SPECIAL 12-Hour* 

Shift Salary! 

Punctuality, Attendance k 
| Many Other Bonus Plans- 

. PLUS A 

$50 
HIRING 
BONUS 

| After 60 hours successful 
empIoyment,.when 
you bring in this ad 
at application. - 

Opportunity for Temp 4c 

Temp-to-Perm Positions 

I Most have own traniportitkm 

I Lloyd Creative Temps can 
I help you find the job oppor- 
I turuty you've been looking 
I for. We have many immedi- 
ate openings for depend- 
lable, consaentious people 
in a variety of light ind us tri- 
I al positions, eoe m/f/d/v 

CALL NOW ' 

, (7G8).S66-0727 
| LLOYD GREAHVB TEMPS 

On the spot interviews 

are conducted daily 
' 'at 8am at 2pm only! 

42 Oak Creek Plaza 

| Oak Creek Shopping Plaza 

Al tkc Intencdtoae of «S 4i M 

Mundelein 

eoe m/f/d/v 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tim* 



I ELEHARKET IRS ft 
LICAL ilLIVERY 

Earn $200+/week. 

Cash paid daily. 

No.experience, will train. 

Apply, today, start todayl 



(701) #45 9140 



Snowphw 
] Owner Operators | 

Northshore Area 
Top Pay -Guar. Hours 

j Work today- \ 
J pay tomorrow 

1(708)272-1747 



Combination 
WAREHOUSEMAN 

and TRUCK DRIVERl 

wiih CDL licEfrtE. 

Company ' n cowTRucriori ; 

inidusTRy. Hwvy lihir+q, 

PAy uVUEd ON EXPERIENCE. 

(708) 48M «0 



DRIVERS 

Local company seeks drivers i 
i for their over (he road/local i 
'division. Reefer experience' 
'helpful, excellent driving' 
,rccord a must. CDL license, 
.required, excellent pay plusi 
i benefits. Apply at 

IBjrchwooo Twmm' 

3111 152nd Ave, 

Kenosha, WI 

Mon-Fri 8am - 4pm 

or call Mike 
(414) 859-3018 

EOE. 



LOOKING FOR 

AN 
OPPORTUNITY 

As a Plant Malntananca 
Trains*? We are In need ot 
people with a desire to learn 
general machine repair.' Will 
train the right Individual. 
Good wages with room tor 
advancement. Benefit pack- 
age. Apply In person at 

BIRCHWOOD MEAT 
AND PROVISIONS 

County Hwy MB, South of 142 
Kenosha, Wl, 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



WE ARE 
GROWING! 

nred ol IS* hectic oomrute? 

Interested in future JdwcwMrt? 

Enjoy working aHi tt busnwj 
cofnmnity n) cMt orpiotjons? 

For Interview pkate cat 
Maria at (708) S77-3637 

Monday October 10th 
9am to 5pm 

WELCOME WAGON* 

ANBGHBORrfOOOTrUIXTKW 
since 1928 

Ah Equal Opportunity Employer 



■BBBBHBHBBBBBBBEBBBBHBBBBBEBHHBBEB 

| Customer Service g 
| Representatives | 

3 Local area printing firm is looking for a full-time g 

B Customer Service Representative. .Qualified B 

B candidate must possess general office skills and c 

Eerrjoy working in a fast-paced environment, g 

aBenefit Package available. Phone Ruth at (708)b 

5244-7425 after 10:30 AM daily. g 

■EBBEEEEEEEEEEEEBEEEEEEBEBEBEEEEEB 



MANUFACTURING 
PRODUCTION WORKERS 

1st and 2nd shift. Due to tremendous growth, Decorel, Inc., 
a leading mfg of picture frames & framed art, has immedi- 
ate openings available in our Mundelein mfg facility and 
for order pickers & packers in our Waukegan distribution 
ctr for 1st & 2nd shift. 

Apply in person. M-F 8*10 am 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 
- and 3860 Sunset Ave., Waukegan, IL 



ZION FIRE AND POLICE COMMISSION 

CITY OF ZION 

AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 

FIREFIGHTERyPARAMEDIC 

Age: At least 21 when hired 

Women and Minorities arc encouraged to apply. , 

Military Veterans must have Honorable Discharge and may qualify for crcd 

it under the law. 

Must have High School diploma or GED Equivalent. 

Must be U.S. Citizen. 

Must Pass Physical Agility Test, Written, Oral and Medical Examinations, 

Must be of good moral character as evidenced by a background check and by 

references you provide. 

Must have Illinois EMT-P certification or Illinois Firefighter II certification 

and secure the other within one (1) year. 

Pick up application forms at Zion Fire/Rescue Department, 2828 Sheridan 

Rd., Zion, IL between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. 

Completed applications with attachments must be returned in a sealed enve- 
lope to the Commission by 5:00 P.M., November 1; 1994 at the Zion 
Fire/Res^ Department, 2828 Sheridan Rd (Station 1). Zion, Illinois. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Futl.Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



Mundelein marketing 

company Is looking 

for a full time 

Receptionist/ 

tjitcettve Assistant 

Applicant must be persorv 
ile, organized/ type 55 
wpm and be proficient In 
Word Perfect. Qualified 
applicants only. 

Apply In Person . 
American 

Marketing Service! 

955 Campus Dr. 

Mundelein 



CLERICAL 

Immediate Start 

General ofc/word processing, 

Typing 40-50 wpm. 

8:30a -4fl0p,Mou.-Fri. 

Bannocldjurn area. 

$7.00 hr, + Increases. 

Call Help Unique 
for interview 

708-215-9300 



CusttmtrStrvJM 
latoJLMtsfetrttfti 

Lake Fore it 

Marketing firm looking 

for full-time employee for 

. customer service, sales 

administration position. 

We are a manufacturers 

rep company in the - 

consumer electronics and 

computer products 

industries. Duties will 

Include order processing, 

order followup, customer 

service and a variety 

of dealer and sales 

support functions. 

Please fax resume and 

salary requirements to 

708/1 34*590 



SECURITY 
OFFICERS 

tmmtrf/tft Openings 
In 

Lake County, Ml Prospect, 
Ubertyville, Crystal Lake 
•Premium Pay ' 
•Uniforms Provided 
•FREE Life Insurance 
•FREE P.E.R. Registration 
•FREE Stale Training 
•MaScal/Dental Available 
•Tuition Relmbursemenl 
•Paid Vacations 
•Excellent Benefits!! ' 
4ppry in Penon 
WW, 4 Thurs. 
10am* 3pm. 

GUARDSNARK 

1590 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

Suite 205 

Ubertyville, IL 

708-367-7935 

• - EOE 



BBBBBBBBflBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBn 

E It's Not A Job! 3 

It's An Adventure! 

g A-TTs Hair Sensation Is looking tor experienced .|J 
g hairdressers. Many benefits. Please call Terrie [J 
n ; . for Interview. (708)526-8940 pj 

HBBBBHyBSBBBySUyByUHHHHBBBBHBByBBil 



fc PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR J 

fc tnd Shift tj 

We have an Immediate opening for a hands-on * 
J production supeMsor^echanlcal aptitude required, J 



I 



as well as the ability to lead and direct people. 

Bilingual In Spanish Is a plus. . Send resumes to: 

BOX XX 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 






PRIOR-SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES 

Need a Part-time job? The Illinois Army National 
Guard needs your skills and experience. You could 
qualify for: Great part-time Pay, Retirement Points, 

Leadership training, education and many other 
benefits worth checking out. Immediate openings. 

For more information call your local recruiter or 

1-800-OK-GUARD 



Illinois 



Americans At Their Best 




NATIONAL 

GUARD! 




h 

i 

i 

at 

s 

I- 



OM Country Store 

IS HIRING — 

•6 Servers 
•2 Cooks 
•2 Cashiers 

DAYS, NIGHTS 
& WEEKENDS 

•Great Benefits 
•No Tip Sharing 
•Weekly Paycheck 

$2H Sign on Bonus 

For Grill Cooks, Servers, 
& Cashiers! 

See Manager for Details 
Come by Mon,*Frt 

CRACKER BARREL 

GURNEE 
(708) 244-1512 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




Lb 

4 



J 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnU-Tbne 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



rsfflPPfHG! 
! CLERK 8 

S We need a person- to S 
9 store, pick and 'ship J 
borders on first shift. • 
I The preferred candi-l 
H date should have | 
A good math skills, a J 
j| stable job history, j 
j| have experience and y 
a be a iorkilf t operator. S 

H We offer lull benefits, ty 

| 40 IK, paid vacation, y 

ft APPLY IN PERSON OR | 
| SEND RESUME TO: j 

! Aciown- 8 



i 



24UHighview 
Spring Grove, Illinois 

815-675-6641 



■BBEBBEBBEflBEBB 

JOBS NOW! 

j Outitanding Temp and 
i Temp to Permanent oppor- 
1 (unities for the following.' 

•Assemblers 

•Inspectors 

•Shipping/Receiving 

•Pickers/Packers 

Positions ire tvtiUble 
with outstanding Libenyville, 
! Mundelein, Wauconda and 
i Lake Zurich customers. lst& 
| 2nd shifts available. 

We offer EXCELLENT 
piy raise, vacation pay, hol- 
iday pay and bonus opportu- 
nities! Medical insurance 
also available. 

LibertyvUle 

Lake Zurich 

(708) 550-1150 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

IbbeeeebebbbbeeI 




•TOOL AND DIE MAKER 
•TOOL ROOM MACHINIST 
•SURFACE GRINDER HAND 

Close tolerance work. lOyrs. exp„ must have 

own tools. Top wages, full benefits. 50 hr. wk. 

drug & smoke free environment. 

(708)526-2222 



SEARS PORTRAIT STUDIO 
FULL AND PART TIME CHRISTMAS HELP WANTED 

Here's your opportunity to work with one of the most national 
ly recognized companies in the photography industry. Sears 
Portrait Studios are operated under license by CPI Corporation 
in over 900 locations. - - 

If you are creative, outgoing, talented with children and enjoy 
seeing the direct result of your work, this may be the job for 
you. Photography experience Is not necessary. Ability to work 
with the public a must Any previous experience in retail sales 
is preferred. 

Hours may include evenings and weekends. 

We provide a fully paid training program, competitive compen- 
sation, and outstanding opportunities for career advancement 
Put yourself in our picture! Salary commensurate with retail 
sales experience. 

APPLY IN PERSON TUE-SAT 1 0-6 

HAWTHORNE CENTER 

E.O.E. M/F 







How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: Dear... Search: Last week 1 applied for a position in a col- 
lection agency as a collector for which I have four years expe- 
rience. The interviewer asked me where I see myself in three 
years from now. My answer to his question was I want to own 
my own collection agency. The interviewer turned to me and 
said "wrong answer", then ended with "thank you for coming 
in". I feel the interview was blown at that moment What is the 
proper way to have answered that question? LG . - Liberty ville. 

Al Dear L.G. Evidently the interviewer felt threatened with 
your goal to open your own business in their field. The idea 
of you gaining all their knowledge of their business and 
clientele obviously didn't sit right, which is not hard to 
understand. Next time when asked that question, answer with 
something a bit more open-ended such as "I see myself being 
the best I can be in my field". 

9: Dear,. .Search: Due to cut-backs I was laid-off from my 
last job in February. I have been collecting unemployment 
compensation since that time and have been notified that I 
have been cut off. During this time I have been doing things 
around the house and traveling with my husband. Now I 
have begun to search for a job only to find that there are 
fewer jobs available and loads of people looking. I have 
applied for an extension on my benefits only to have been 
rejected. I didn't think 1 would have a hard time finding a job 
with my office management skills but it appears I was 
wrong, I am noticing fewer of those positions available now. 
Has that level of management been cut out of smaller com- 
panies? What should I be focusing on? D.L, - Ltndenhurst 

A; Dear D.L. Let me sum by saying that Unemployment 
Compensation is not "vacation pay". Too many people believe 
this to be the case thinking that this is "owed to them", thus 
intensifying our current problems in the state. While a person 
may have compensation benefits due them it is supposed to be 
looked upon as a short term situation with the idea of putting 
all your efforts into seeking new employment The time to 
have started looking for a new position was at the time of your 
lay-off and not once have your benefits been exhausted. These 
days interviewers are wise to gaps in employment history. 
And with a back-up story such as your, anyone would ques- 
tion drive and ambition. In answer to .your first question, not 
necessarily 1 To your second question, I would "be focusing on 
getting a job if that is in fact where your heart is now! 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumce, 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 4949 Grand Ave., 
Gumee, EL 60031. 






-", . -- V 



-\___ 




CLASSIFIED lAktlANc) Ncwsp*pcRS October* 7, 1994 



- 



W/*V<VA*'JAV,V.V.*. , .'>. , Av.*y.*J/A}£.K* 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted I 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 




f* Help Wanted, 
U FuUrTime 



■Telephone Switchboard ■ 

■ Motor Werks ■ 
• of Barrington \ 

■Day & eve. shifts at our* 
"beautiful . auto mall.^ 
■Excellent benefits for self-" 
■motivated person to route ■ 
Jour steady flow of Incom-JJ 
■ Ing calls. ■ 

I Apply in person I 
I Comer of Barrington Rd. I 
I & Dundee Rd. in Barrington " 



Agape 

Chiropractic 

Center 

Doctors office in Like Villa 
looking for responsible per- 
son for various duties 
including answering phones, 
greeting patients, and sched- 
uling appointments. Hours 
are Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday from 8:30 a.m. Ill 
7:00 p.m. Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 12:00 p.m. 
til 7:00 p.m. 

Please Call 

(708) 356-8093 

Ask for Karen 



: PRINTING : 

" 'Experienced Pressman ■ 

■ for:FLEXO/WEB . ■ 
" labels, 1/C to 5/C J 

•Pressman J 

■ HEID l/C, SM offset ■ 

■ ■ 

■ .•Hot Stamping ■ 

■ . Role to tole labels ■ 

■ ■ 

■ PT/FT person needed to do ■ 
a miscellaneous job duties B 

J Island Lake ; 
■(708} 541-1400" 



TELLER 

We ire seeking in experienced 
teller for a lull time position Mon.- 
Fri. 10am to 7pm. If you haw a 
blend!/ smile and enjoy servicing 
euitomen, please call (70S) 
54M831ext 510 U hours i 
diy seven days a wek for an auto- 
matic telephone application . 

Libcrtyvilie Bank 

Branch of Richmond Bank 

1509 N. Milwaukee 

Llbcnyvillc, II. 60048 

EOS 



data processing 

Omni Resources Inc. the LARGEST 
Wisconsin basod Information Systems 
Consiibng firm celebrating Its 10th 
anniversary seeks experienced IS 
Professionals for our Wisconsin, 
Minnesota & Illinois clients. Wo desire 
Programmer Anatysts w/at least 3 yrs 
nppfcatjons ex p. Must havo 1 or mora 
o! the following: 

* UNIX Notwofkerfi'CPtP/roken Ring 
'LOTUS Notes, ACCESS ■ 
" PowedxiMer, Smaftlaik, Gupta, GUI 
' NATURAL/ADABAS 
'SAS, Focus CYBORG, 

ENDEAVOR, CPCS 
' AS/400 RPG 400. COBOL 
'C++ Visual BASIC/INFORMIX, 

SYBASE, ORACLE SQL 
•Windows NT 

We offer an excellent compensation 
and benefits package including mod 1 
leal, dental, vision, 40t(k), tuition 
reimbursement, on-site training and 
lime 1/2 paid O.T, 

OMNI RESOURCES, MC. 

330 E. Kllbourn AveiSte. 707 

Milwaukee. Wl 53202 

1-000-23G-5920 . 

Fax: 414-325-3039 

equal opportunity employer 



J Experienced J 
5 Help Wonted^ 

I ■• Waitress jj 

r • Cashier * 

• Hostess I 

;j All Shifts am 8c pm : 

9 TOPSRtstaurant j 

1 Route 1764 45 
' Mundelelrt 

5(708) 949-6666 J 



CNA'S 



FULL&PART 

IMPOSITIONS 

Long term care facility 
Is now accepting appli- 
cations for Full & Part 
Time Positions. Duties 
consist of primary care 
which Include dressing, 
grooming, persona! 
hygiene, toileting, 
bathing, passing ' of 
meal trays and hand 
feeding residents. 
Interested parties 
should contact Rose 
Mary at Libertyvllle 
Manor (708) 367-6100. 



LIBERTYVILLE 
MANOR 

610 PETERSON RD. 
LIBERTYVILLE, IL 

708-367-6100 



Computer 

PRODUCTION 
MANAGEMENT 

United Mailing Is seeking a man- 
tsgor for our personalization area. 
Exporionco w/lasor & Impact print 
production roq'd. Embossing & 
Ink-Jet oxportonco - helpful. 
Opportunities for addfl rtisponslbll- 
Itles avail, for the right canddato. 
Successful track record supervis- 
ing o production stall roq'd. Comp. 
salTbons pkg. Quality Corporate 
chlldcaro avail. Please submit a 
re sumo Incfdg salary history & 
reqm'ts to: David A. Tabert UNIT- 
ED MAILING, INC., 1001 Park 
Rd., Chanhassen, MN 55317. 
EEO/AA Employer M/F/D/V. 



V 



^ 



Retail Store Office 

Harlem Furniture 
is Growing! 

We need P/T help In our 
Vernon Hills office. We 
offer competitive salary, gen- 
erous discount & advanced 
opportunities. If you have 
general offfce or cashier 
experience, call: 

(708) 617-4700 eit 265 



True Value 

* Sales Person 

with merchandising 

experience. Looking to 

train for a possible 

management position. 

* Experienced 
Cashier 

with good phone 
and people skills. ' 

Please Apply In Person 

256 E. Westminster 
Lake Forest, II 

li. Contact Bob Barcus j] 




4 Banking "^ 

Banking 
Associate 

Fast growing Banking 
organization is seeking a 
banking associate to work 
in a friendly and profes- 
sional environment. We 
seek a self motivated Indi- 
vidual positive attitude 
who Is dedicated to excep- 
tional customer service. 
Various duties include 
account openings, cus- 
tomer service and loan 
documentation. Previous 
experience is a plus. Good 
benefits and pay. Please 
send resume to 

American 

Chartered Bank 

of Lake Zurich 

459 S. Hand Rd. 
m Lake Zurich, IL 60047 g 



"ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE^ 

Libertyville company seeking full time inside sales 
people for expanding Telesales department. Looking 
for skilled sales people with a good phone voice, who 
are not afraid to ask for the sale. 

*Salary plus commission 
♦Benefits 
*Paid training 
CALL 708-367-1109 



KASKOR INDUSTRIES 



HBBHBBHBHBfSr30HHBOBBBHHHBaBf30r3BHI3Hcl 

| GENERAL | 
jj FACTORY | 

C Transformer mfgr. needs men & women for assembly, a 

^inspection, and packing assignments. We need ener-[J 

a 
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9 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
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a 
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cgetic, self-starters & team players! 

1 «4 Day - 40 Hour Work Week, Mon.-Thurs. 
•Life, Health & Dental Benefits 
•401 K Retirement Plan 
•Paid Vacation & Holidays 

'•"t ; Apply in Person To: 

ACTOWN ELECTROCOIL 

2414 Highview St. Spring Grove, IL 60081 
(815)075-6641 



c 

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BBBEaBBUaBaBHBBBafiaaBBHSHBHa69BaBa 




Medical 

ravsKALTwrumT 

PHVSCAL 7WUPBT AMSTANT 
WMHMTONDCAKA 

FT perm positions avail. In 
expanded outpatient orthopedic 
practice w/some sports medicine. 
Exp. 1/or interest In manual thera- 
py. Spacious, well equlp'd office 
w/dynamic group ol PTs, PTA's & 
athletic trainer. Oppty to be 
involved w/new program develop- 
ment & marketing. Call, fax or 
send resume: Richard Singer, 
P.T., CENTER FOR PHYSICAL 
MEDICINE, 5201 Leesburg Pike, 
Suite 910. Falls Church. VA 
22041; 703-9984000 ext. 328; 
Fax: 703-99a-a256. 



Nurae 



CRNA'S 



lOWA-lmmediite Openings: 

Qualified CRNAi. DtpL ol 
Anetthetia, Univeriity ol low*. Musi 
bt graduate ol AANA-approvtd 
anesthesia program, passed nation- 
al ctrbtying examination. Must pos- 
sess knowledge 4 ability with current 
antithetic* & techniques, evidenced 
by 3 current references. Must be 
•ilg. lor RN & ARNP licensure in 
Iowa Fun time position w/moderate 
night University benefits. Relet 
sssist. Send or lax your resume to: 
CRNA Search Committee. Dept. of 
Aneithetia, 6621 JCP, University of 
Iowa. 200 Hawkins Dr., Iowa City, IA 
52242. FAX: (319) 356-2940, The 
University ol Iowa ."ii an EEO/AA 
Employer. Minorities & Women are 
encouraged to appry. 



Modioli 

PTA PROGRAM DIRECTOR 

Physical Therapist or Physical 
Therapist Assistant to coordinate 
program & teach curriculum. 
Prefer teaching exp. & a degree in 
addition to physical therapy. Must 
be He'd and/or elig. to practice In 
Ohio. Contact Thomas Howard, 

(419)531-9610 



THE WINNING TEAM 

J YOU 
fAND THE 

'CLASSIFIEDS 
/GET YOU 
(WHERE YOU 
'WANT TO GO 




Medical 

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT 

Progressive & growing physical med- 
icine & retubli tatlon group practice in 
Falls Church, VA is seeking physician 
assistant wfinter est In musculoskele- 
tal & rehab medicine. Responsibilities 
IncTd In-patient rehab rounds, out- 
patient evaluation & blow-up care, 
trigger pohl InlecBons & pain mgm't 
strategies. No call, no weekends. 
Virginia Ic. nee. Exc. sal /bens. Call 
Judy Crenerj or Sharon Kutesz, PAC, 
703-998-8000. ext 333 or 331 . CEN- 
TER FOR PHYSICAL MEDICINE, 
5201 Leesburg Pike, Suite 910, Falls 
Church, VA 22041. 



Make A Career 
Out Of Caring 

Earn a Certified Nursing 
Asst. Certification white 
you learn & grow In a very 
rewarding field. 

Hillcrest Nursing 
Center 

will help set your course. 

Come visit Hillcrest 

for information on 

ourprogram. 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 
Round lake Beach 60073 



■BBBBBBBBBEB 
^Immediate Opening E 
B for. B 

gtyMRPi 

Ej to work with adult £j 
£1 developmentally 5 
B disabled women p 

g 1 Full Time g 
g Position Open g 



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B 
B 



Contact 
Gail Becker 



B 
B 



g Mount g 
g St Joseph g 

g (708) 438-5050 g 

g Lake Zurich g 

■EBBBBBBBBBB 




CNA's 



1. Are you looking for flexibility in your schedule? 

2. Are you looking for a facility that is progressive 
and that offers competitive salaries? 

3. Are you looking for benefits and health packages 
that are optional and fit your needs? 

If you answered "yes" to any of the above, we would 
enjoy the opportunity to meet with you and discuss 
your future with MAPLE HILL NURSING CENTER. 
Call Suzy for further details on how you can become a 
member of our team. 

(708) 438-8275 

« eoe m 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




DIRECT 
CARE 

NIGHT 
SHIFT 

('* [Mil li .1 111 ) 



^=^^. 



THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

ALL WE DOt 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 
\S Care 
';■ Workers 

Full or 

Part Time. 
Wiling to 
.train for 
positions. 

F!««m emntmet Omtt Brnkerr 

(708) 438-5050 



RN/LPN 

Full Time Opening 

2pm - 10pm 

Including Saturdays 

Contact 

Candy Sabay 




220 



Help Wanted 

FuU-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 

Fa U -Time 



NOW HIRING 
u!uc FOR FALL 

!f%l .^1 w Across from Great America 
Starting up to $5.00/hour 



PART TIME PAYS 8c NIGHTS 



PERFECT FOR STUDENTS - FLEXIBLE HOURS 

3-4 hour shifts available • Weekdays Monday-Friday orfend Weekends 

At Our Gurnee BURGER KING 

Across the street from Great America 

5300 Grand Ave. 

336-3427 



(708) 



■. -* ▼■■Hi 



ADVERTISING SALES 

Lrteland Newspaper*., Lake County*! iargett weoWy 
newspaper group Ja seeking an Adrartising Account 

Exocufva. The cancSdate will be re»pondbte tor fold 
sales calls, developing a key area In Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in interpersonal 
contrmJrtication, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The camSdote muct also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to hancie multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candkto te should have previ- 
ous sates experience. Ptease send resume or cad: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IX 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



JOIN THE 

Crate&barrel 

rOR THE FALL- 
CHRISTMAS SEASON! 

Crate and Barrel Is looking for energetic, 

hard working people to work at our fast 

paced Catalogue Warehouse shipping orders 

to our customers. We need detail-oriented 

people with good organizational skills to pick 

and pack orders. This Is a seasonal position 

starting Immediately through December, t ' 

FUN PLACE TO WORM , 

Terrific Employee Discount! 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Come in to complete an application. 




CATALOGUE 

311 OILMAN AVENUE 
WHEELING, IL 60090 



Drive to Excellence. 
Work for Manpower. 
Win a Car! 




Join our team; see how well we treat our employees! 
We have good wages and fringes, terrific top-notch 
customers who lead their industries in health care, cel- 
lular phones, automotive components and much 
more. The people who work for Manpower are part of 
a great team. 

To thank all of our employees, we'll be giving away 
over $12,000 in prizes - including a car - to our employ- 
ees. ' 

We have immediate work opportunities for: 
*Light Assemblers *Biblogists & Chemists 
♦Pickers & Packers *Certified Nursing Assistants 
•Electronic Assemblers 'Physical Therapists 
•Secretaries •Medical Assistants 

•And MORE! 

Call the Manpower office 
nearest you for more information. 

Vernon Hills (708) 918-1200 McHenry (815) 385-6600 

Wauconda (708)5264300 Marengo (815) 568-0100 

Waukegan (708)4734300 Harvard (815) 943-8100 

Healthcare (708) 578-1133 ■' Technical (708)578-1500 






OcTobeK 7, 1 994 LAkclANrJ NcwspApcre CLASSIFIED | jy 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



COLD HEADER 

OPERATOR 

and SET-UP PERSON 

1st or 2nd shift. Call Todd A. 
Clemtns, Fortress Forma, 
Now BBr1ln,.WI 414-797-7520, 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 



I Bobcat Owner! 
[Operators j 

I needed for racfwplowing I 

| Top Pay -Paid Fie!' j 

Guu. hours. ' 

I Work today- j 
I pay tomorrow 

j (708) 272-1886 1 



ANDRE'S ' 
STEAK HOUSE 

•Dining room wait staff 

•Banquet watt staff ; 

•Cooks 

•Pantry 

•Bus People 

Please Call 
(815)678-2671 



Drivers 

SPOnER/DRIVER 

Gum«e Area Loc. 

On site Tankwa&h driver 
position. Prefer to have 
CDL, Hazmat & Tank 
Endorsement. Full-time 
permanent position, flexible 
hrs. Exc. hourly rate, com- 
pany benefits, Call for appt 
70B-594-220O ext. 314. 



RETAIL STORE 
MGR/SALESPEOPlE 

Full or Part Time 

Hourly plus commission. 
Cellular anil paging 
experience helpful. 

Call 
Maria 

(708)655-8572 



t 



CNCMACHNE 
OPERATOR 

Our growing company 

has 1st and 2nd shift 

openings for CMC 

Lathe and CNC Mill 

Operators. Experience 

preferred. Overtime. 

, Lake Bluff, IL 

(708) 473-1300 

Ask for Kurt 



I 



GENERAL OFFICE 

OPPORTUNITY & VARIETY GALOREl 
Ught typing 
S44-OOX6 



perfor JLcrsonnel 



- 



-i. 



■^ 



General Factory 

Now that the kids are back in school, are .you 
looking for a second income? No experience 

necessary. Paid vacation/lhsurance/401 K/ 
r- excel lent, work environment. Mother's hours 
•available. Located in Fox Lake. 

Remington Industries 

(708) 973-2234 



EXPERIENCED FORKLIFT DRIVERS 
2NDSHIFT 

Decorel, a leading manufacturer/distributor of home fashion 

Eiroducts, is seeking full-time experienced reach/stand-up 
orklift drivers on the 2nd shift for our Waukegan distribution 
center. Must be able to operate reach/stand-uptorklift - a must 
Excellent compensation /benefit package. 

Apply in Person 

DECOREL, INC 

444 E. Coiirtland, Mundelein, IL 60060 
M-F8-WAM. E.O.E. • 



yHIIIIIIUIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIg 

| Village of Round Lake | 

Sis seeking an employee' for the Public Works= 
== Department Qualifications include Class C drivers=j 
=license and High School graduate. Good starting = 
= salary and excellent benefits. Applications must be= 
Sreceived no later than October 28, 1994.= 
= Applications are available at the = 

| Willage Hall | 

i 442 N. Mai Lake Road 

= Bound Lake, Dllnola = 



SI 



&mm 

KING 



NOW 

HIRING 

FULL& 

PART TIME 

MOTHERS HOURS AVAILABLE 

Premium pay offered, 
paid vacations, flexible hours. 

Call 708-395-8806 



ODURn^RDa 

«»fcimolt 
Deerfleld 

•Desk Clerk -FT 

Competitive pay, 
excellent working 
environment. . 

Best Benefits In The Business! 

Pletse nop by to nil out 
an application. 

800 Lake Cook Rd. 
Deerfleld, IL 

(708) 940-8222 

EOBM/F/V/D 



) 



QUALITY 
ASSURANCE TECH. 

Custom plastic Injection mokfer Is 
aoeldng a t qualillod first arfdofirv 
process Inspector for our molting 
facility In Dos Plalnos, IL TW* posi- 
tion roo> 3+ yrt, exp. in mechani- 
cal Inspection & complex print 
reading w/an emphasis on tayoul 
Inspection. Familiarity w/plastlo 
Injection molting & cosmetics am • 
definite plus. Applicant must be a 
take charge individual who can 
communicate effectively with ong> 
neerlng 4 manufacturing groups. 
PTA offers comp. wages & bens. 
Please msfl or fax resume w/sal. 
hist & rets, to: PTA CORPORA- 
TION, 17S Christian St, Oxford. 
CT 06479, Aim: Ralph Cheney. 
Fax 203-888-1757. 



pHKTt r ACTIVIIY^ 

X SERVICE I 

^Hastings Lake YMGii 
\ lake Villa, IL 3 

^♦Full and Part Time Positions 2 
k *No Late Nights or Holiday 2 
^•Pleasant Environment . 3 
k»Year-round Employment 
B«Uniforms& Meals Furnished ! 

S •Benefits v S 

_»$5lQ$l0perhour J 

2 (708)356-4001 J 

K EOEM/F- 'J 



ASSISTANT 

If you arc enthusiastic, 
motivated, and enjoy the 
elderly, then we have the 
job. for. you. Join our 
Activity Department' team 
and look forward to a 
rewarding career In long - 
term care. 

Call Jerri 

M-F 9-5 

(708)438-8275 

|p E0B' J 



Sp_ 



ong 



LEASING AGENT 

120 unit complex in Vernon Hills seeking experi- 
enced leasing agent. Knowledge of Sect. 8 a plus. 
Candidate should possess strong marketings skills, 
be computer literate. Send resume to: 

Pebbleshire Phase I 



Sir- 



695 Westmoreland Suite 105 
Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



— "*. 
^ SH1PPINQRE«EI*WCJBA«K BRIVErI 

•Ifox Lake Manufacturing Co. is looking for a.stockfc 
^ room worker/back up driver with CDL license. . ., ^ 
S Duties include checking, counting or weighing incom-W 
king material against purchase orders and moving—. 
J material into production area. ^j 

■fcpull benefits, medical, dental, paid vacation and 401 K.k 
k Apply in person to: 

3 Actown Elect rocoil 

" 2414 Highview St 

\"t Spring Grove, IL 

I 815-675-6641 



! 



@ 



Saks Fifth Avenue, 
The Clearinghouse 



is looking for friendly energetic people to fill the following 
' entry-level full-time and part-time positions: 

•CASHIERS 

•SALES ASSOCIATES 

•LOSS PREVENTION DETECTIVE 

•CUSTOMER SERVICE SUPERVISOR 

Our positions include day, night and weekend hours, we 

require flexibility when scheduling. Please apply in person at 

the store located in the Gumee Mills Mall, suite 42 1 (right 

across from Waccamaw). Our phone number is 

(708) 662-0988. We are an E/O/E, M/F. 



BANK OF 
NORTHERN ILLINOIS, N.A. 

Waukegan • Gurnee • Libertyvilte • Lake Bluff 

WE HAVE THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE AND DETAIL-MINDED 

INDIVIDUALS WITH EXCELLENT WORK HISTORY: 

TELLER 

UBERTYVILLE and WAUKEGAN 

Teller or very heavy cash handling experience 

having balanced own cash drawer. 

PERSONAL BANKER 

LAKE BLUFF and WAUKEGAN 
2+ years personal banking experience with 
some lending or trust experience preferred. 

MORTGAGE LOAN PROCESSOR 



BUFFALO GROVE 
3+ years experience in all phases of , 
mortgage including FHA and VA. 

MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATORS 



; ALL LOCATIONS 
2+ years solid track record of successful origination. 

We offer an excellent salary and benefit package. 
Please call 708-623-3800 for Interview appointment 

EOETMF 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 



■ ■ ■ ■ 



: Teacher &: 
■Assistant Teacher- 

■ needed for daycare in ■ 
J ♦Lake Zurich 

■ Pre-School Teacher ■ 

•Barrington ' 
I (708) 438-1945 1 



HOMEMAKERS, 

TRAINEES, STUDENTS 

4 OTHERS 

Do you enjoy helping the dis- 
abled Senior Citizens, etc? 
No experience required. Free 
training program! General 
homemaklng skills ere 
required along with a caring 
attitude. Trainees will work 
with our clients In their local 
area. We off en Great Pay, 
Bonuses & Pay Raises. You 
must have a car with Insur- 
ance. Please call for an 
Immediate interview. .'■ 
NATIONAL 
HOME SYSTEMS 
Lefre County cmU THclm 
708-336-2885 



GRAPHIC 
DESIGNER 

Dynamic and fast- 
paced opportunity with 
the world's largest inde- 
pendent picture frame 
manufacturer. Work in 
all graphics areas 
including packaging, 
displays and promo- 
tional literature for 
mass market. Quark 
proficiency essential, 
conventional produc- 
tion skills a plus. 1-2 
years experience pre- 
ferred. Send resume 
and salary requirements 
in confidence to: 

Jim Scheyer 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland St. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

EOE 



; Receptionist/ j ; 
! Accounting !! 

| Inlander-Stdndler Paper Co., aj ] 
i leading Midwest paper distribu- 1 ' 
j tor is seeking a qualified reap- j | 
i torus? for its corporate office. 1 1 
[ Responsibilities will Indude a j 
i variety of general office functions 
| such as answering/directing 
! incoming calls, opening mall i ! 
i and light accounting duties. The j [ 
J successful applicant will have! i 
i ' good communication and orga- j 
! j nizao'onal skills and he able to 
1 1 perform a variety of duties. 

1 1 please mail/fax resume, with i 

1 | salary requirements or apply In | 

i person betKen 9 am and 4 pm to: i 

i lnlander-Steindler 
! Paper Co. 

850 Forest Edge Drive 
j j Vernon Hills, Illinois j 
60061-3168 ' 

Irftt: (708) 913-9522 | 
PHONE: (708) 913-9500 



SECURITY 
OFFICERS 

• Upscale corporate location 

full time/part time, all shifts 
'Health & Vacation benefits 
•No experience necessary 

START AT J6.70/H8. 
INCREASES UPTO$7.73/HR. 

LONG GROVE AREA 
NEAR RE 83 & RT. 22 

To arrange Interview, call 

THE MSMSt CORP 

(708) 620-8223 

Won thru Fri, 9am-4pm 




240 


i CfdldCare 



240 



Child Care 



"HONEY BEE'S". Day Cart 

provides quality chid care. Lo- 
cated in Ltndenhuml. Degreed 
In Eany Childhood Education. 
FT/PT. Substitute temp. Rea- 
sonable. Call Melissa (708) 
356-3953. 

AFTER SCHOOL SITTER 
NEEDED, 3pm-Spm (or 2- 
glrts, In my Gumee home, i 
Must have own car. (708) 
244-1115. ; 

CHILD CARE NEEDED In 
my Qraystake home or yours. 
Monday-Friday, flexble hours. 
Non-smoker. (708) 223-8427. 

DAY CARE PROVIDER 
NEEDED 6:45am-5pm, Mu- 
ndelein, Ubertyvtle, Vernon 
HUi area. CMdrsn are 8mos. 
and 3-1/2yra. (708) 818-3569 
leave message. 

GRAYSLAKE. College 

graduate and mother of 2 wl 
provide loving care for your 
preschooler In my home pa. 
(708) 548-6808. 

GURNEE HOME DAY- 
CARE has an opening for 1- 
Infant and 2-toddlers (24- 
months). Happy environment, 
lots of activities and TLC. 
(708) 360-0844. "' 

INFANT CARE NEEDED In 
■ my Ingle a Ma home. Monday- 
Friday, 9am-6pm. Responsi- 
ble aduN preferred. (708) 
587-0055. ' 

LOVING MOTHER OF 1 

would like to watch your 
chUd/chldren, Monday-Frday, 
full time in my new Country 
Walk, Round Lake Beach 
home. Lota of toys and TLC. 
References Avalable. (70S) 
356-7055. 

LOVING MOTHER would 
like to watch your chfld/chtld- 
ren, Monday-Friday, fulHlme. 
Lots of toys and kids videos. 
(70S) 740-0786 Carrie. 

MOM WILL BABYSIT IN 
MY ROUND LAKE BEACH 
HOME, meals and snacks 
provided. 5:00am-6 :00pm, 
Monday-Friday, S75Meek, be- 
fore & after school care avail- 
able. Elis School District, Rot- 
Ins & Cedar Lake Road (706) 

740-0306. 



MOM'S-MISS YOUR 

KIDS? WORK AT HOME! 
Complete list of over 250 com- 
panies, For more Information 
send SASE and $1 to: Home- 
work, Inc., P.O. Box 535, ls- 
. land Lake, 111. 60042. 

Mofher In Llncotnwood 
Knolls Subdivision has 2- 
fufl time openings In her home. 
Have references and b CPR 
C0Tl«ed. (708) 873-1549. 

MOTHER OF 1 wffl care for 
your chHd hi my home. Infants 
welcome. Lots of love and fun. 
PenbrookA3urnee area, call 
Carta (708) 623-8724. 

MOTHER OF ONE has 2- 
tuM time opening s In my Parte 
Cfty home. Please cat Andrea 
anytime. (708)263-5271. 

MOTHER OF ONE wfl care 
for your chHd In my Round 
Lake Beach home. Futl or part- 
time. Al hours and ages avai- 
abte. (706) 546-3202. . 

NEED A RELIABLE SIT- 
TER FOR YOUR 
CHILD/CHILDREN? Mother 
of 2, home al day, reasonable 
rates. All ages. (708) 
973-1566. ^^ 

ONE-ON-ONE NEW BORN 
CARE) Lindenhurst mom wfll 
provide loving and experi- 
enced new bom care In her 
home for your child only. Ref- 
erences available. (706) 
356-0667. 



250 



School/Instrucflrja 



ACTING IS A BUSINESS! 
Want to know how to gel Into 
»? Working actors wM teach 
you how to get started. Al 
seminars are in Lake County, 
Call lor location and cost. 
(708)436-1966. 

CERTIFIED MATH/CHEM- 
ISTRY TEACHER. Tutoring 
for 7-12 grades. Available 
evenings and weekends. 
(706) 265-^0457. 

PIANO LESSONS, 12yrs. 
experience. References avail- 
able. All ages. Lake Vila area. 
(708) 356-9155. 



A«re»idE 



t '. ■*-:».• JvM»>!v;*>*-«v» X 



301 


i Antiques 



310 



Bazurs&nfts 



Grayslake 

Antiques 

& 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois 120 &U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. • 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 

OCTOBER 9 

Admission ^.00 



COME ONE COME ALL!) 
WOOD CRAFT SHOW! 
ONE DAY ONLY! HAND- 
MADE FURNI- 
TURE/KNICK- 
KNACKS/CHRISTMAS 
DECORATIONS. SATUR- 
DAY 10/15, 9am-5pm. 
1150 CEDAR CREEK DR., 
LAKE ZURICH. (NEAR 
QUENTIN A RT. 22 
CEDAR CREEK SUBDIVI- 
SfON). ' 

PEPPERMINT PATTIES 

Sin ANNUAL CRAFT AND 
BAKE SALE. 2246 Ottawa 
Rd. (block and a half North off 
Sunset), Waukegan, October 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9am-5pm. Flor- 
als, Hand made baskets. 
Much More. 



320 



Electroeics 
Computers 



304 


Appliances 



APPLIANCES. Amana Re- 
frigerator, with Ice maker, 
white $200. Tappan electric 
range, while $50. (414) 
862-6484. 

G.E. . REFRIGERATOR 

AND STOVE, Nke new $600. 
Table and chairs $25, gas 
grill, $75. (706) 623-8724. ■ 

KENMORE ELECTRIC 

DRYER, perfect condition. 
$125. (708) 356-5364 after 
1:30pm. 

REFRIGERATOR-FREEZ- 
ER, 3-door with ice mak- 
er, very clean, works 
great, $300. (708) 
872-1494. 

WHITE LIKE NEW EYE 
LEVEL RANGE with burners 
$200.(706)740-6001. 



COMPUTER SHOW AND 

SALE. October 9lh., 10am-. 
3pm. Holiday Inn, 6161 W. 
Grand Ave, Gumee. Save up 
to 60% on new/used hard- 
ware, software, books, CD's, 
parts, supplies, accessories 
and shareware. For more In- 
formatlon call (219) 931-3761 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



4-FAMILY GARAGE 

SALE, all baby equipment, all 
clothes, big mens clothes, and 
more. October 8ih, 9am-3pm,' 
2381 Sunrise Dr., Round Lake 
Beach (Country Walk Subdivi- 
sion). 

COME ONE COME ALU! 
WOOD CRAFT SHOWI 
ONE DAY ONLYI HAND- 
MADE FURNI- 
TURE/KNICK- 
KNACKS/CHRISTMAS 
DECORATIONS. SATUR- 
DAY 10715, 9am-5pm. 
11 SO CEDAR CREEK DR., 
LAKE ZURICH. (NEAR 
QUENTIN A RT. 22 
CEDAR CREEK SUBDIVI- 
SION). 



■Zl 



*Jc*rr " ' ••- " ' «»fcJi«a*« 




CLASSIFIED UkElANd Ncwspapcrs OcTobw 7, 1994 







OARAGE SALE. QUALITY 
chtdren'a clothing, alzea 0-6, 
baby oqulpmonl, mnlomtty, 
household Items, stereo cabi- 
net, more. Saturday 10/8, 
oam-3pm, 140 W. Church, 
Wauconda (Rt 176 to Church), 

GARAGE SALE. Saturday 
10/9, -9am-3pm, 14980 King 
Dr., Green Oaks/Ltoertyvllfo. 
Beautiful clothes, shoes, kitch- 
en Items, crafts, odds/ends. 
Something tor everyone. 

GREAT BARGAINS, 
MANY Items under $3. Glass- 
ware, jewelry, baskets, wall 
decor, curtains, carpet pieces. 
New kitchen counter 70ln. x. 
65ln.. Jeans men and worn- 
ens, clothing, shoes, stereo 
equipment, books, and miscel- 
laneous. 3488 Dorchester, 
Gurnee (2-blocks behind Wet- 
tons), Friday & Saturday, 10/7 
& 10/8, 8am- 5pm. ' 

HUGE GARAGE SALE, 

household, clothes, toys, mis- 
cellaneous. Saturday 10/9 and 
Sunday 10/9, 9am-5pm, 344 
N. Wlndrtdge, Round Lake 
Park.(by Murphy School). 



HUGE MOVING , SALE. 

Quality Items. October 6th, 
7th, A 8th, 9am- 5pm, 918 
Sprlnghaven, LbertyvMe, (But- 
te rflekJ to Lake to Sprlngha- 
ven). Honda Spree, hMI, mens 
suede jacket, lawn mower, 
womens clothes, sheets, an- 
tiques and much more. (708) 
680-8722. 

TOYS-TOYS-TOYS. The 

F.O.L.K.S. (Famine* of Lin- 
d«nhurit Kids) Group. Par- 
ent Group tor the Lrndenhurst 
Early Childhood Center, will be 
holding a used toy salo this 
Saturday, October 8th, 9am-? 
The sale will be held In the 
parking lot at 309. Granada 
Brvd, Just south of Grand Ave. 
near Eagle. Tons of gentry 
used toys at great prices. 
Baked goods tool) TOYS- 
TOYS-TOYS. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there Is stHI 

things thai Just did not go 

Call us at LAKELAND News- 
paper* and run R under the 
"FREE or Giveaways* classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO. . CHARGE! (708) 

223-8161, ext. 140. 



ST 



FAIX RUMMAGE SALE 



"a 



UNITED PROTESTANT CHURCH 
54 S. Whitney, Graylake 

• October 14th: 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm 

• October 15th: 9:00 am - 12 noon 

is a 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



344 


Jewelry 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 

Lovesoat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream. $550. LEATHER 
sofa and loveseat, $950. Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST SELL! 
(708)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
b*droom a*l $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom set $1,000. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELL! 
(708)548-1045. 

BEATIFUL WALNUT Dl- 
NINGROOM SET, table 
55x37, extends to 90x37, 
stained and heat proof sur- 
face, 6-chalrs, all In excellent 
- condition, $850*est. (708) 
438-8789. 

BRAND NEW, brown, 
peach, and beige, sofa and 2- 
large wing chairs. Asking 
$700. Call after 5pm. (708) 
395-7130. 

BUNK BED-TWIN TOP, 

FULL BOTTOM, white steel 
with mattresses, 3-l/2yrs. old, 
asking $275, (706) 360-9812. 

CONOVER GRAND PIA- 
NO, Irvingroom set with end ta- 
bles, queen size waterbed, In- 
cludes both dressers with mir- 
ror and night stand. All negotf- 
able. (708) 662-1510. 

COUCH, LOVESEAT AND 
CHAIR, beige with country 
pattern, good condition, $200. 
(708) 973-0768. ' 

END TABLES AND COF- 
FEE TABLES $85. Lamps 
$30/ea. Hanging Tiffany 
lampSSO. Mens 26ln. 10- 
speed, like new, $90. (708) 
566-2821. 

JACUZZI-VITA SPA, 6- 
seat, used less than lyr. Will 
deliver within reason. 
$3,700/nrm. (708) 548-6621 
Grayslake. . 

KING SIZE WATERBED 

Unn semt-waveless mattress 
with center support. Head 
board with shelves and minor, 
6-drawer base. $400. (708' 
285-r1799. 

KITCHEN SET 4-PIECE, 1- 
' ' leaf, oval shape, 48lnjt41ln. 
Asking $75. Wntngroom set, 5- 
ptoce, 601 n.x40 In., Include a 
leaf. Good condrllon, asking 
$150. On* TRS 80 compute* 
with daks, and manual. Ask- 
Ing $75. (708) 566-4735. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 

size, never used, ratal, $500- 
1 $1,100. Sacrtfloe: $135- 
$295. (706) 913-8985. 

MUST SELL!! Furniture In- 
cludes couch and loveseat, 
dressers, mattresses. (708) 
249-0874. 



LEFT ME AT THE ALTAR. 

Must sell engagement ring, 
$3,200/bost. (414) 882-9463 
after 4pm. 



348 


Lawn/Garden 



INSTALLED CEDAR MAIL 
BOX AND POST, with plant- 
er base. Wooden sunburst 
door mats. Custom work. 

(815) 385-6938. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



CANNON CAMERA AND 
RECORDER, 8mm video. 
Only used once. On sale 
$800. Craftsman snowblower 
12 in. 8-26, only used once. 
$800. Hutch wUh dlnlngroom 
table, expands lo seat 8, $300. 
Professional card table, seats 
6, $150. (708)362-3547. 

DESIGNER SILK SHAN- 
TUNG WEDDING GOWN, 

cathedral train, never worn, 
never altered, size 8. Paid 
$2,000, asking Sl.OOO/besL 
(708) 680-6816-evenlngs, or 
(708) 465-1666 ext 101-days. 

DJ EQUIPMENT^ ' mrxer 
board and stack, wtth tree 
lights on stand. $800 down 
and take over payments o( 
$127/montn. (815) 875-8434 
ask for BPI. 

ELECTRIC LIFT CHAIR. 
Cinnamon color, 4yra. old. 
Paid $1,300, asking $600, Big 
professional desk, metal, 5- 
drawer, very good condition 
with chair. Asking $200. Over 
the tub plastic bench, $50. 
(708) 249-1869. 

ENCYCLOPEDIA SET 

1994. Major brand, box uno- 
pened. Original $1,200, must 
sejl $295. (708) 860-0585. 

WANT MORE PRIVACY?? 
Do It With TREES! No fence 
or permits necessary wtth our 
beautiful thick Blue Scotch 
Pines. We guarantee, deliv- 
er and plant for FREE wtth 
orders of 10 or/more frees. 
4lt.-5«. $65/each; 5ft.-«ft. 
$85Mach; 6ft.-7tt. 

$i20/each. Larger trees also 
available. Nursery Grown. 
Thousand* to ctioo** from. 
(615) 338-3348. 



WEDOING DRESS, size 10 
wtth room to take In or 1st out. 
BeautVul whle long sleeved 
dress. Sequins and pearls on 
bodee, sleeves and on de- 
tailed train. Scalloped neckline 
and back. Look special on 
your wedding day. In the store 
thto dress would be $1,200, 
Asking only $500. Call after 
5pm or leave maaaagi. (708) 
973-0149. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



EXTENSIVE FALL WAR- 
DROBE of mens and ladles 
clothing. Includes. formal wear 
and furs. Must sefl Immeclate* 
ty. (708) 831-2428, 

HOT TUB. 7-SEAS, port- 
able, just plug In, reclining 1- 
slde, 2-captaln seats other 
side. 7-fots. blower, light, wrap 
around red cedar. Can be 
used Inside or outside, custom 
cover. $1,600, (414) 
697-1929. 

MERCURY 1972 SNOW- 
MOBILE, $350. Queen wa- 
terbed, $100. Table and 4- 
Chalrs. $20. (708) 223-7841. 

MOVING SALE. MUST 
SELLII Leaving state. 388 SX 
computer. Zoom video cam- 
era, furniture, alr'condlrfoners, 
pictures, clothing. (708) 
358-7770. 

PLUSH CARPETING 

10ft Jt1 2ft. and padding $800: 
10fLx12tt. low pie carpeting, 
$200/best. (708) 263-9918. 

Unfinished redwood labia 
top* and bases. One price 
takes all. S30fM»al. (70S) 
578-9419. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS. Now Commorcial- 

Hame Units. From 5199.00/ 
Lamps- Lotions- Accessories. 
Monthly payments low as 
$18.00. Call Today FREE 
NEW Color Catalog. 1-800- 

462-9197. 

- 

YAMAHA 1989 MOTOR- 
CYCLE; $100. 1978 Kawasa- 
ki; $100. IBM Computer; $100. 
Commodore Computer, $100. 

(708) 7a5-0644. 

RAPID WEIGHT LOSS. 
-SPECIALIZING IN DIFFICULT 
CASES/ KNOWN NATION- 
WIDE FOR GREAT RES ULTS. 
•GUARANTEED 'INCREASES 
METABOLISM 'BOOSTS 

ENERGY 'STOPS HUNGER 
CALL UNITED PHARMACEU- 
TICAL. NOW SAVE. 20%. 1- 
800-733-3288. 




DOG BOARDING- 
Depehdable ADULTS win 
care for your DOG or Puppy, 
In our home, . Fenced yard 
and loving care for your PET, 
while you vacation, or leave 
on weekend irlps. Have 
Many Excellent Referenc- 
es. (708) 966-6319, 
Florence, or leave message 
and date you anticipate 
boarding. 

AQHA 7yr. OLD CHEST- 
NUT GELDING 15HH, very 
smooth gaRs, good for frails. 
Has potential to show. $1,000. 
(414) 674-6309. ' 

BABY GERBILS FOR 

SALE, call (708) 338-3702. 

CUSTOM DOG PEN 

IGfljortjrOfl. Chain Ink green 
plastic laminated, moveable, 
lyr. old. $800/best. (70S) 
548-2982 after 7:30pm. 

DOBERMAN PUPPY, 3- 

1/2/m6nths, red, mate, tall, 
shots and wormed. Parents on 
premises. $150, (708) 
823-3414. ' 

LABRADOR RETRIEVER 
PUPPIES AKC, OFA excel- 
lent. Yellow's and black's. 
Champion bloodline. Dew 
claws removed, bred for tem- 
perament and beauty. $275- 
$375. (708), 872-6931. 

PUPPIES, Shlh-Tzu, AKC 
registered. 2-males, black and 
white, had shots. (708) 
872-0235. 

SHAREBOARDER WANT- 
ED. Syr. old Thoroughbred 
Gelding, hunter/jumper type. 
Stabled In Wauconda. In- 
door/outdoor ring. No begin- 
ners please!! Call Kelly 
(708)854-2266 Leave Mes- 
sage. 



HwmWmn 



SPAS& 
HOTTUBS 

Factory Direct Outlet. 

Always the low price. 

All colors, sizes 

6 styles! 

Woodland Pier I 

(4T4) 534-5264 



358 



Musical Instruments 



DRUM SET 9-PIECE pearl 
wtth cymbals and hardware. 
(414) 697-9147 caB for details. 

GOYA classic guitar wtlh 
case, handmade, no plywood, 
30+ years old, $400. (708) 
546-6803. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



•PUPPIES.' Labrador 

pups, black/Ian mix, 8-weeka 
otd$75/ea. Seagal Mbi pups, 
8-weeks old, $75/ea. (414) 
654-7923. 

2-IGUANA-S (1) 3ft. long, (1) 
2ft. long, cage, hot rock, water 
dish. $300/best. (708) 
578-9418. 

AKC REGISTERED SHE- 
TLAND SHEEP DOGS, 6- 

weeks old, 4-males. $250ea. 
(414) 551-0257. 



S30 


Firewood 



S54 


i Mcrrfa^Slorage 



S93 



Trees/Fianfs 




Firewood LTD 



23 years In business 
• Mixed hardwoods $65.00 F.C 

• • Oak $70.00 F.C. • 

• Cherry • Birch • Hickory 180.00 F.C, 

Discount on 2 or more. 

Credit Cards Accepted 

(708) 878-0111 



MOVING??. CALL BOB The 

Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
safes; restaurant equipment; 
Light - machinery. Lift gate 
van and smal crane trucks. 
PACK RAT Errterprlae*. 
1)662-1956. 




S87 



Storage 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

1 2 yr. old Seasoned Hardwood. 

Oak, Maple, Ash, Cherry. 

S59.00 per face Cord. 

(1/3 of full Cord) 

Free Stacking & Delivery, 

"Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn" 

(708) 546-3613 



OFF SEASON BOAT 
STORAGE, 4-mlnules west 
of Chaln-O-Lakes State Park 
entrance. $60/rnonlh Inside, 
$25/mon!h outside. (815) 
675-2244. 



WICK'S 
TOPSOIL 

4 YDS. - $65.00 

6 YDS. - $75.00 

8 YDS. - $85.00 

14 YDS. - $115.00 

Local Delivery 
Out of Ana Xtra Del. Chg. 

(70S) 367-6566 
(815)344-7928 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land dealing • 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Itee 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 



S99 



Mscdhnerjos 
Services 



KARAOKE PARTIES. Com- 
plete mobie system. Includes 
operator/singer, large selec- 
tion of songs, 2yrs. experi- 
ence. Competetlve pricing. 
Call for details. (708) 
223-6382. 

PERMANENT COSMETICS. 
Brow, eye and Lip color. 

Beautiful Forever!. Electroly- 
sis By Sherry. 18 years ex- 
perience-certified. Wauke- 
gan, Lake VIII*, Lake Bluff. 
(708)244-1640. 




364 



Restaurant 
Equipment 



WE DO IT ALL!! PERSON- 
ALIZED CLEANING. 'Rea- 
sonable rates. *Quafty work. 
'Fully Insured and bonded. 
Tree estimates. *Senlor citi- 
zen discount. ■Weekly/bl- 
weekfy. *CommerclalAeslden- 
tlal. CaD us today. Sunrise 
Servlc*9.(708) 587-5323. 



LAWN MOWING 

Affordable, afllcltilt *> thorough 

Enjoy your weekends 

while I take care, of 

your lawn. Ask for 

. Logan or leave 

message at 

(708) 546-6746 - Round Lake area 




ATTENTION RESTAU- 

RANT OWNERS! Stainless 
steel steam table, 5-wells, 
electric, on wheels, wtth cut- 
ting board. NSF approved. 
$350. (708) 223-7451 . 



S42 


landscaping 



S42 


landscaping 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



Slot Machine* WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- Of Part*. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machines, Paying 
CASHI Call (70a)>eS-2742. 

WANTED! DON'T GIVE ft 
■way. Sell It. Clothing and' 
Crafts to sel. In Consignment 
Shop, will Pick-up. (708) 
526-1285. 



FaiLis an excellent time to Sod! 

Sod is available until ground freezes. 

Fresh Sod Daily • Wholesale & Retail 

Pick-up or Delivery ' 



DeBuck's Sod Farm 

of Wisconsin, Inc. 

N6127 Co. Hwy P., Delavan, Wl 53115 

(414) 728-5424 

If you want the DcBeit, order DeBucka! 




Lakeland Newspapers 

Classified 

(708)223-8161 



rtwtrf 



nXtSeital 



Bit/ 



PETS IN NEED 

Needs Your Help! 

We have until November 1 to liquidate 

the animals we have, or they will be 

destroyed! 

Here is a sample of some of 

the animals we have available for adoption: . 

Long and short haired cats and kittens, some 

declawed, Siamese cat, 

Shepherd mix, Springer Spaniel, Dobe-Lab, Boxer mix 

Weimaraner, long haired Dachsund, 

and many other small, medium and large dogs. 

Adopt from a shelter 

& receive your 

•pay/neuter card. 

Bo a responsible pet owner! 

(815)PAT-1462 
Pets In Need 







What's New 
On the Market 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAYI 

The Aeeiei Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WEIL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT...VOLUNTEER 




Ws don't destroy homeleee animals! They live their 
■ lull lives uncaged II not adopted. We spay end 

neuter, conduct e dynamic pet vteltttan/Vierspy 



program for the eiderty, provide education programs 

tor young people and offer a special "pet retirement" 

" THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP! 



program. 



Name ___ 

Address __ " 

City, ST 

Zip Code ■ ; 

Pleaee mall to: Aaalal Animal Foundation 
^ P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (015)495-9411 



Individual 

Membership $15 

Family Membership 

$20 

Donation * 



AFFORDABLE 

TOWNHOMES ON 

SALE NOW!! HURRY!! 

Minutes to Abbott; Baxter and 

Lakehurst. 1 and 2 bedroom 

units starting at 543,900. 

Romantic fireplace, deck, pool, 

sauna, appliances, cathedral 

ceiling. Much cheaper than n?nl 

• country club living • superb 

convenient location) 

Ask 4 Brendn or Gary 

Cornerstone Realty 

872-8998 




OPEN . HOUSE-GURNEE 
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 
12PM-4PM, 3442 FLORIDA 
AVE (NORTH ON QREENBAY 
RD, WEST ON FLORIDA). 3- 
BEDROOM RANCH, 1-1/2 
BATHS. LARGE LOT, 2-CAR 
GARAGE. DECK AND FLORI- 
DA ROOM i FULL BASEMENT* 
PARTIALLY FINISHDED. BY 
OWNER. (708) 662-2715. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, 
October 9th, I2pm*5pm. 317 
W. Plnevfew, Round Late. Tri- 
te ve I, 3-bedrooms (optional 
4th), farrsryroom, l-i/2baths, 
2-tlreplacea, Irvingroom, dl- 
nlngroom, ~ kitchen. 
$109.9O0/be»t. (708) 740- 
7433. 




FOR SALE BY OWNER. 
OPEN HOUSE, SATUR- 
DAY AND SUNDAY. 1pm- 
5pm, 2407 Deerpam Dr., Ll> 
denhurat. 3-bedroom ranch, 1- 
bath. Spacious wak-out deck. 
All neutral colon. Newer cen- 
tral air and heat. Newly remo- 
deled Mtchen and bath. Low 
taxes. Close to school and 
■hopping.:- $120,900.(700) 
356-1624. 



WAUCONDA 

28995 N. WADE 

OPEN HOUSE 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9TO 
1:00 pm -4:00 pm 

Beautiful sprawling hillside 
split on 1.1 wooded acre. 
Approximately 3,000 sq. ft. 
of dramatic living space. 3 
bedrooms, 3 full baths, 2 
marble fireplaces, oak 
kitchen, brick terrace and 
much more. All recently 
redecorated. S22 1,000 

Cindy 

Re/Max Suburban 

(708) 577-9797 



OcTobcK 7, 1994 LaIccM Newspapers CLASSIFIED' 





A 4-tMdroom, 2-1/2 bath 
Wllctwood Houm, . Large 
deck overlooking (he lake. 
Free pro-quafrfyfng tor mort- 
gage. $155,000. (708) 
549-9400. 

BARRtNGTON- Norifiwttt 
Hwy. 3-bedroom, 2-bath, on 
1/3acra. Appliances, central 
air, 2,5car garage. Energy efft- 
dent. Rustic cedar shakes. 
Just reduced: 1 1 80 ) 000 NOW 
$179 ,900. Contract, sate or 
rent/option possfeto. (70S) 
526-3306. . 

BRICK RANCH ON 11 acr- 
es, 4yra. old, great for ani- 
mals. No Realtors. (708) 
395-1312. - 

WAUCONDA, NEW 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3-car garage, wafc- 
out basement. (700) 
367-1122 days. 

LAKEVIEW WOODLANDS 

Gorgeous, 5-bedroom, brick, . 
2-story. Formal dlnlngroom, 
sunroom, 3-car garage, wfth 
high doors. Situated among 
gorgeous oak trees' on a pri- 
vate pond. Prestegktus area 
near Wauconda. Price re- 
duced to $299,000. ERA J. S. 
JAMES (700) 301-5555 Char- 
lotte Brady-Agent. 



FOX LAKE- LARGE Deluxe 
Cedar/Brick 2-story wfth Eng- 
lish basement on 1-acre+ 4-. 
bedroom, 2.5bath, Jacuzzi, 
fireplace, 3-car garage. TOO 
MANY UPGRADES TO LISTI 
Ready to move-In. Contract 
Possble. Financing available, 
1370,000. NOW $269,900. 
DEAL DIRECT With 
BUILDER and SAVE. (708) 
526-8306. 

GURNEE-PRESTIQKXJS 
PRAIRIE OAKS, 2600sq.fi., 
4-bedrooms, 2.5-balhs, 2-car 
attached garage, fireplace, 
large kitchen wfth appliances, 
first floor laundry, new carpet- 
ing. Mature landscaping, 
backs up to park. Must See!) 
By Owner, $197,000. (708) 

662-2622. 



LINDENHURST 3-4 bed- 
room ranch, 1-balh, new floor- 
ing throughout, private patio, 
lot wfth fruit trees. Close to 
shopping. $i 18,900. (815) 
303-9484. 



Mchenry- raised ranch. 

3-bedroom. Finished lower 
level, deck, energy efficient, 
2-car garage.. Many up- 
grades! River rights. Avail- 
able August 1st. Contract 
Possible. 1111,000, 

$127,900.(708)526-8306. - 



KENOSHA, South Side, 

7807- 23rd Ave. 2-bedroom, 
brick ranch. Large rooms, fin- 
ished basement, central air. 
Move-In condition Great 
neighborhood. Great Schools. 
(414) 657-4323. 



WAUCONDA-NEW CON- 
STRUCTION! 4-bedroom, 3- 
bafhs, 2*s(ory contemporary. 
Wafc-out basement, fireplace, 
central at, 2-decks, 50x150 
lot, 2BO0+sq.tt. Lake rights. 
$178,000. (708) 487-9295. 



You" CAN own your own 
home! No downpayment on 
Mile* material*, , attractive 
con it met ion financing. Call 
Miles Homoa today, 1-800- 
343-2884 ext, 1. 



CRYSTAL LAKE Schools. 
DEAL DIRECT WITH BUILD- 
ER! 4-bedfoom, 2-story, 2.5- 
baths, deck, energy effldort. 
River rights on wooded lot 
DRY basement has potential. 
1 1 1 lOOQ $179,900. (708) 
528-8308. 




(UMOC 



VAN 

The 1672 square foot Van Is a medium sized home that is perfect for a city lot. Ideal for those 
with school age children or empty neslers whose kids come home (or extended visits, the Van truly 
makes the family the cornerstone of this design. The attractive brick and wood front, Including ellher 
tile of shake roof, adds to the curb appeal o! this eye-catching home. 

Think food when entering the Van. The U-shaped kitchen, with built-in appliances, pantry and eat- 
ing bar Is to the left ol the entry. Casual meals can be served directly Into the adjacent nook, radi- 
antly lit from the front windows and overhead skylights. On more formal occasions, or Just (or a 
change of pace, dinner can be served In the vaulted dining room. 

The living room, also with a vaulted celling, flows into the dining area to create a great roomfeffect 
This provides plenty of space tor family and friends to gather lor conversation, watching your (avorlte 
television show or playing the latest board game. A glowing fireplace keeps everyone toasty anc 
able to enjoy the fun on cofd winter evenings. 

A good-sized master suite, located in the back left corner, Is Ideally situated for parents of young 
children. Featuring a walk-in closet, private bathroom and separate vanity, it is placed with a mod- 
est bedroom, each with ample closet space, on either side. This allows parents to maintain their prl 
vacy, while sill! being able to keep tabs on nearby children. For retired folks, one of the spare bed 
rooms can be utilized as a sewing room, music room, home oHice or what have you. 

The hallway between the bedrooms has a full, skylit bathroom and a generous utility room with 
access to the two-car garage. Groceries can be easily brought Into the house regardless of the 
weather. 

For a study kit of the VAN (403-08), send $9.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 2307-LP60, 
Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books featur 
Ing Landmark's most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark. 






rr-r 



^{i$ 



?Sf^'W.J 



fi.*u-lt 



:&mm 



tJ,J 



who 

want 

to save 

NOW!! 



Compara ihasa standard feature*: 

• 12" of R38 ceiling Insulation 

• 2x8 exterior walla R-20 standard 

■ Ceilings and Interior walls are gypsum board 

■ Maintenance free vinyl siding, standard 

• Cedar or other tidings, optional 



Build your new home 

with us this winter 

and get 

3 FREE APPLIANCES 

or take your choice of 

appliances at 50% OFFI 

Save up to $3,0001 This 

is a limited time offer. 

Delivery restrictions 

app ly 



•Gas forced ak hen 

• Paachtraa Insutatad metal dad antianca door 

•T>»fTTalwQodwwjo«wioirTmirtararioitT» 
•flerior dad wrappirji 






Welcome 
Home 

TO OVER 90.000 
FAMILIES 



P rk» dots not Indite pern to, survey and srtgl- 
rwering lot daaring saner and aatar or aapic 
and mil. culvers, driveways, watt, ttrxfecap- 
ing or f kandno (These and otfw at* irrprote- 
manfs avi labia. Lower fawk on BJ-ttvs* and 
TrtlavBSnotftnafttd). 



COUNTY LINE BUILDERS 

216 Janet Drive 
Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



300 N. Milwaukee Ave. Ste. A 
Lake Villa 

708-265-0230 



LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market Information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 



CALL FOR TODAYS BEST RATES 

& FINANCIAL UPDATES ...9am, noon, 5pm 



-15 yr Mortgage Rates 



30 yr Interest Rates 

I on 3 pelnti 




Consumers save SI.OOO'% 



754lmtnutm 




It Yr Junto 




WIE 



TYPE 



ptartE 



MOWN LOCK 



CAPS 



AAA Home Finance 

8,875 30yrFa ' O/ncne' 

B.S- iSyrFix Omona' 

5.75 lyrARM Omens* 



312-866-1AAA 
5% 45 days 
'5% . '45 days 
10% 60days 

'»^a«*p*t0ti«|*c>9r»emi,0p«t«^l»»#*^ 
A 36 1 9 W.Devon Ave. Chicago 60659 



American Home Finance 

9 30yrFot 0/270 5% 

3.625 3mo.ARM 0070 10% 

5.125 7 yr Balloon' 0070 10% 

Apa/t/nwrl Ndgs, Seam pt Mpprovsl Man you buy. 
A A 830 N. Notlhweit ){ wy Palatine 60067 



708-705-1940 

60 days 
60 days 
GO days *7/23 



Associated Financial services 

9 30yrFn* 0/295 5% 

6.125 lyrARM 0295 5% 

8.25 Tyr Balloon* 0/295 5% 



708-291 -6580 

•CttliJiriotauWK-ln* 

30 days 

30 day i *7/23 



100% flnandngfl mo, 1 1 yr toe h mIMCorio* 95% LTVftnd mto*. nil. 
A 555 Skoklc Blvd. Northbrook 60062 



BancNet 708-310-0180 

8.875 SOytFb 0/275 5% GOdayi 

3.6 lyrARM* t/275 10% 60dayi ♦COFI 

7.875 6/1 yr ARM 0/276 10% Mdayi 

74rwrpiMptmttJira.10o^cW^«»ll.onB««:h*Mt. 

650 E. HlgRlra Rd..Ste*1)S..5cliaumbum 60173' 



IMTE 



TYPE 



PISfEE 



%0CWN LOCK 



cws 



Block & CO. 

5.875 lyrARM' 0/CaJI 5% 

8.875 MyrFix' Q/Call 5% 

ZEflO POINTS, ZERO COSTS, 

NO APPR, NO TITLE, NO BANK FEES. 

A A 254 Market Square Ci. Lake Forest 600 i 5 



708-295-5554 

60+ days *PurerUReft 



60+ days 'Purctv/flafi 



cdk Mortgage 

8 7 yr Balloon 

7.S Syr Balloon 

7.25- 3/1 yr AHM 



512-849-4000/708-869-7100 

0/295 10% 60 days 

0/295 10% 60days 

0/295 10% 60 days 



AA 980 N. Michigan, Chicago 6061 1 



central Federal savings 

7.25 2yr/6mo.ARM 0/750 10% 

6.5 lyr/6mo.AHM 0/750 (0% 

Fhi y«r fhsd eymnl rata *d|'jd ad uml-tnnutDy. 
Loini «l*o available RalM wll »ary, 
3 1601 W. Belmont Ave. Chicago 60657 



312-528-0200 
60 days 
60 days 



Clayton Root Mortgage Funding 312-281-8550 

3.625 3 mo. ABM* .25080+ 15% 60 days +COFI 

6 lyrARM 0/260+ 10% 60dayi 

7.375 3/1 yr ARM 0/280* 10% COdiyi 

Slngl* Purify, Condos, 2-4 Unl a Imwtor Loam • C Mifomitoo 4 Jumbo. 

A 1323 W. Wolfram Chicago 60657 



HATE 



TYPE 



PTSffEE 



MOWN LOCK 



CAPS 



Columbia National Bank 

9 30yrFoc 0/290 

6 lyrARM 0/290 

7.875 S/lyrAHM 0/290 

Suburban (708) 1774418. 

£b 5250 N. t larlem Ave. Chicago 60656 



312-775-7500 

5% 45 days 
10% 45 days 
10% 45 days 



Fleet Mortgage Corp. 

8.675 OOyrFoc 0/300 5% 

9 SOyrFHA 0000 3% 

7.625 3yrARM. 0/300 5% 
Alt (bout our Jumbo Mm. 



512-580-0500 

45 days 
60 days 
60 days 



8750 W. BryoMawrSte. 460 Chicago 6063 1 



Liberty Bank for savings 

9.125 SOyrFot 0/345 5% 

8.5 ISyrFa 0/345 10% 

6 lyrARM 0/345 10% 

Jumbo • wo pt leana tvallabk Ptaatt call for rati*. 
W711I W. Foster Ave. Chicago 60656 



312-792-1031 

60 days 
60 days 
60 days 



Midwest one Mortgage Services 

8.375 7yrBaJlooiH 0/300 10% 

8 3/3 yr ARM 0/300 10% 

6.625 lyrARM 0/300 '10% 



708-450-5000 

60 days +7/23 
90 days 
60 days 



Uti than parttet cridlt, w MM you loo! St habk EtpaRoL 
fh 501 W. North Ave. Melrow Parte 60160 



RATE 



TYPE 



PTSTIE 



%OOWN LOCK 



CAPS 



North Shore Mortgage 708-446-7472 

7.375 3/1 yr ARM* 0/295 10% 60days +CorllAirbg 

8 5/1yrARM+ 0/295 10% 60 days tCarfiJumbo 

8.375 7/lyrARM+ 0/295 10% 60days +CorilJunto 

WinrMlki: 708-446-7472, Evinslofi: 708475-1300, Uncolfl Pull 312-9154115. 
AA 576 Lincoln Ave. Winnetka 60093 



NVR Mortgage 

9.125 SOyrFot 0/295 5% 

7.875 7yrBa»bon+ 0«S 10% 60 days 

5.75 lyrARM 0/295 10% 60 days 

No doe taint, own* oeeupdd, 2nd homn, I tmmlor prepMdM, 
AA 60 Revere Dr.. Stc-330. Nortlibrook 60062 



708-205*1313 

60 days 

+7/23 



Consumers or lenders, 
call Robin at 708-834-7555 



LEGEND: Illinois Resldenlial Morlgogo Lican-se r^9 
Bank rS Savings & Loan tSliA; Mortgage Banker xA. 
Mortgage Broker . Rates subject to change without notice, 
Survey Date: 9/30/94 Information independently compiled by 
Mortgage Market Information Services, not affiliated with any 
financial institution or real estate group, and Is believed to be 
accurate but not warranted. O Copyright 1967, 1908, 1089. 
1090. 1091. 1092. 1093. 1994. 

LENDERS CALL ROBIN FOR INFO 708-834-7555 



=B 



-^J.^nu». lni .-k.. 



-»««*»•♦. V — 




■ » i iii* milt ,<m *^. « .^ » »■■ 




3 CLASSIFIED UkrlANcI Newspapers Octo(>» 7, 1994 




500 



Homes For Sale 



504 



Ilomcs For Rent 



JOHNSBURG NEARLY 1 
ACRE ON A CUL-DE-SAC. 
3 bedroom Ranch with full 
basement, 2.5 car garage, up- 
dated kitchen and bath, Johns- 
burg Schools, private beauti- 
fully landscaped backyard, 
near Chaln-o-lakes access 
and Metre. $124,900 (708) 
497-9083 Appointment. 

JOHNSBURG/LAKE 
DAWNWOOD, 5-bedroom, 
3-bath, 2-story home, sitting 
on beautiful wooded lot with 
pond, private setting, whirlpool 
master suite, country kitchen, 
approximately 3,0G0sq.Tt, plus 
lull finished walk-out base- 
ment. Priced well below mar- 
ket. $219,000. (815) 
344-9335. 

MCHENRY-THIS WILL GO 

FASTII Lovely new 4-bed- 
room, 3-fuB baths, spit level 
home on wooded lot accross 
from beautiful Morraine MIHs 
Stale Park. Quality construc- 
tion, cathedral cellngs, lire- 
place, appliances. Main- 
tenance free exterior, 2.5-car 
finished garage. Completed 
lawn and drive. Plus many 
more extras. $152,500 CALL 
NOW. Financing available. 
Contact: Schafer Builders, Inc. 
(615)459-1333 Of 1-800-546- 
1339. 

H Ingleside^ 

I Brand New ^ 
1 Custom Home k 

■ On spacious cul-de-sacK 
KloL Neutral decor with J 
Sail the extras including:! 
•3bdrLR,DR,FR ( Eat-in | 
IkKitchen, C/A, 2 car j 

Sgarage&MORE! 5 

MOVEINREADYim 
$169,000 I 

{(708) 550-9709* 



LAKE VILLA HOUSE 4-bed- 

rooms, Saso/mortlh. Call after 
6pm. (815) 363-9039. 

WAUCONDA-WALK TO 
EVERYTHING. 1-bedroom 
1-bath mobile home, central 
air, deck, washer/dryer. 
$545/monlh -tsecurity. Avail- 
able Immediately. Located In 
Adult community. (70S) 
526-5000. 

INGLESIDE- 2 BED- 

ROOM home, nice yard, 
basement, fireplace. Newer 
carpeting and bathroom. $620 
per month plus utilities. Avall- 
• able Oct. 1. Call Rafc)h, days; 
(708)390-8050, ext. 667. or 
evenlngs,(708)546-5809. 

LAKE CATHERINE 

HOUSE nestled among the 
oaks. Prime location, 2-bed- 
rooms, 1.5-balhs, carpeted, 
sky-lfghts, deck, flrepace. 
Beautifully landscaped, lawn 
care provided. Boat sljp. For 
non-partying adult or couple. 
References. $750frnonth. 
Available October 15lh or No- 
vember 1st. (708) 395-6342 
days, or (708) 395-5530 
evenings. 

LAKE VILLA DUPLEX 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2-baths, with 
garage. $825Anonth. Can after 
6pm. (815) 363-9039. 

■ Grayslake 

■ School District ■ 

■9 room, 4 bedroom" 
■farm house for rent. All" 
■appliances included, ■ 
■water Included, utlli-" 
■ties are not. Available" 
"Nov. 1st or sooner. " 
m $U00.00/month. 
m (706) 234-4635 ■ 



504 



Homes For Rent 



FOR RENT. (1) 2-bed- 

room, rental. Appliances. 
Adults. No pets, references re- 
quired. McHenry, on the 
Chain. (815) 344-3944. 

2 BEDROOM COTTAGE 
on Petite Lake. $550 plus utIK 
lies and security deposit. (708) 
395-5045 



McHenry 

Huge bay window for 
river view! 2 b/r, 1 ba, 
Ig living room. Bsmnt 
& gar. 2 yr+ lease. 
$745/mo. + sec. dep. 

Land Mgmt 

815-678-4334 



1. Waukegan Townhouse In quiet neighborhood 
near SL Therese Hosp. Stove, fridge, and central AC, lull 
basement w/laundry hook-up. Ready to move Into. $600/mo 

Cat Russ, Judy or Nancy at (7(B) 2234800 firm 9AM -7PM. 

2s Zlon apartment In quiet neighborhood near Lewis 
Ave. and Forest Preserve. 2 bedroom deluxe unit with 
stove, 'fridge, dishwasher, AC, coin laundry. Ready to move 
Into. 9600/mo. 
CaS Ribs, Judy or Nancy at (706) 2234800 from 9AM- 7PM. 

3. Round Lake Park 6 room ranch, 1.5 baths, all 
new carpet, stove and 'fridge, full basement w/laundry hook- 
up. Available soon. No pets. S800/mo. 

Cat Russ, Judy or Nancy at (706)223-4800 from 9AM -7PM. 



C^Hjn/ 



Russ Gwatney 



AU ml etfite *J«rtan§ to U* oemftfti k mbjeri Id toe Fedenl f$it 
»fou*jV|AdwricfeautoUJlk$>llfli(Jw»l^ 

afcriaiikn btwd oo net, color, rd%Son, is, htaUcso, toadui Habit or 
rtifaul otfata, or u intention to mike uy iuda pnfanai, Vaiuifaaiordii- 

oimfaaltoc. Id (he ulc, nniii or In*adn| d haiioj. 

to tMlofl, too ttflato Hunan U&t Ad pnaibii OtCfinJAtfon bued on 
•jt, martr* mmtd mm, or unfavorable diichtf|e lilubod tothlliaai vOl 

rtrtlmowir^TirayiioyiAertki^fotttd*^ 

tani in henby tofonod ton d Mttap •oVcrted tit wntithte on to equal 

opnortunfe bub. 

1» oMpUfl ef Aufnfeatan, al toi Chfan? ant Pair UomtofAlEnoi toO 
heatil^WHJ^OrW 

^^ EauttHouokw 
m I OtpartinWti 




504 



Homes For Rent 



GRAYSLAKE 3-BED- 

ROOM HOUSE. In country. 
$825/month, plus security de- 
posit. Non-smoker, no pets. 
Available 11/1/94. (708) 
223-0729. 



508 


Homes Wanted 



FORMER RESIDENTS OF 
LAKE ZURICH. AREA RE- 
TURNING HOME. Need 1-2 
bedroom house, garage, 
$600-5660. References avail- 
able. Have two loveable labs. 
December 1, 1994. (800) 817- 
5277. E-Mail or Fax. 

STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. We Buy 
Houaai. Wo Loin Money. 
All Cain or Term*. Fast 
Sotllomorrt. Scott: (708) 
945-8235. 



514 



Coodo/Town Homes 



GURNEE 2-BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH townhouse, fireplace, 
vaulted celling, new carpet, 
air. Golf, swimming etc. 
$87,000. (708) 367-6535. 

HIDDEN GLEN TOWN-' 
HOME, 3-bedrooms, all new 
carpet and appliances. 
$750/monlh, plU3 security de- 
posit. (708) 568-5754 after 
4pm. 

WAUCONDA 2-BED- 

ROOM, 2-BATH, condo for 
rent, on Bangs Lake. Seven 
month rental. $725/month, 
heat and air Included. (708) 
424-0566 or (708) 487-6731. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



BEACH PARK-LAKE VIEW 
MOBILE HOME #90. 2-bed- 

room. 1.5 -baths, air, central 
heat, celling tan, sttlngroom, 
ktchen, targe closets, GE-re- 
frigeralor, . Magic Chef 
oven/broiler, - stove, mi- 
crowave, dishwasher, wash- 
er/dryer, bull In stereo, Tandy 
computer, plus printer, carpet- 
ing throughout, blinds. 
drapes, furniture and unities, 
shed. $20,000. Call before 
noon (708) 244-3735. 

KENOSHA 1992 FRIEND- 
SHIP-ASPEN 16x72. Central 
air, deck, shed, all appliances. 
Many extras. Financing avail- 
able. $32,500. (414) 
942-9881. 

MOBILE HOME 1993 OAK- 
WOOD, 14x80, 3-bedroom, 
2-baths. All applancea Includ- 
ed, washer/dryer. $22,000. 
(706)724-6601. 

MOBILE HOME FOR SALE. 
1989, 16f|j(70fl., 2-bedroom, 
2-balh, al applancea, centra] 
air, storage shed, shingled 
roof, enclosed porch, comer 
lot MUST SEE TO APPRECI- 
ATE. $44,900. CALL (708)546- 
8828. 

MOBILE HOMES- SIN- 
GLES and Doubles. 2-3 bed- 
rooms. Lake County and Ke- 
nosha County. Bank bans and 
appraisals. 5% Down on Any 
New Home Financed. (708) 
838-1965. ,. 

MODULARS • DOUBLEWIDES 
" SINQLEWIDES • TWO 
STORY MODULAR ON DIS- 
PLAY! FOUNDATIONS • 
BASEMENTS • GARAGES • 
WELLS • SEPTICS.WE DO IT 
ALL Jl FREE STATEWIDE 
DELIVERY/SET. RILEY 

MANUFACTURED HOMES 1. 
800-798-1641 




520 



Apartments For Ren 



3 ESU 



APARTMENTS AND 

HOMES FOR RENT- In Ihe 
Kenosha area. For Informa- 
tion on available rentals, 
phone Rental Information 
Services. (414)652-0609. 

FOX LAKE VERY large 2- 
bedroom, 2-balh, lakefront 
balcony, $660/rnonth. (708) 
973-2005. 

FOX LAKE 1-bedroom bHev- 
el. $540/month plus deposit, 
all utilities. No pets. (312) 
660-6792 beeper. 

HAINESVILLE- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS, new 6/unll 
building, carpeting, and laun- 
dry facilities, $625/month 
+ security. Taking applica- 
tions now for immediate oc- 
cupancy. No pets. Cal (708) 
546-1474. 

KENOSHA 2-bedroom apart- 
ment, $45G/month, plus uni- 
ties. Clean and private park- 
Ing. (414) 694-5133. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake 
VlHa. $545 and $680/month. 
Heat water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 

LARGE 1-BEDROOM, 
ZION, Free heat, water, gas. 
Coin laundry, air, parking, ca- 
ble. $475/monlh. (708) 
587-7217. 

LARGE STUDIO APART- 
MENT IN FOX LAKE. Air. car- 
peting, pool, ten nb. boat sip, 
aoces to chajn-o-lakes. Avail- 
able. Immediately. (708) 
336-4733 ' . 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 

3-1/2 miles west of CLC on 
Washington St. 2/bedrooms, 
carpeted, laundry factty. No 
pets. No wateibeds. Lease. 
$560/month, gas/heat/ water 
Included. (708) 328-6874. 

SPRING GROVE. SMALL 
2-bedroom air conditioned 
apartment., second floor. No 
Pels. $525/month plus securi- 
ty deposM. Includes heat, wa- 
ter, sewer, stove, refrigerator 
and ample parking. (615) 
675-2860. Leave Message. 

UNION GROVE, Wl. 2-bed- 
room apartments. FREE heal. 
New carpet. Celng Fan. Mini 
blinds. Close lo schools. No 
pets. From $490Anonth. (414) 
878-4809. 

WAUCONDA- ONE BED- 
ROOM Apartment, newfy 
decorated, hrlng room, ktch- 
en. Carpeted, yard, stove, re- 
frigerator, heat and hot water 
Included. $5i5/month, lease 
and security. No pets. Avail- 
able Immediately. (708)433- 
0891. - 

WAUKEGAN 1-bedroom du- 
plex, stove/refrigerator, heat 
and water are provided. Se- 
curity deposit and references. 
Mature person preferred. 
Close to Abbott lab. and Baxt- 
er. (708) 336-8936. . . 

WAUKEGAN- 2 BEDROOM, 
cottages, Victorian setting, 
off street parking, Available 
now. $650-$750/month. 
(70S) 336-0144. 

ZION, 1-BEDROOM FUR- 
NISHED. Prefer Non- 
Smoker. $430/month > pluase- 
curty deposl. (708) 746-8881. 

ZION-EAST SIDE. 2-bed- 
room. close to towTvtrain. New 
carpet/paint +. Military wel- 
come. Section 8 nol available. 
No Pets. $595/monlh. (708) 
831-5388. 



WEDNESDAY 10 A.M. 

Is the deadline for 

classified ads! 
(708) 223-8161 



Apartments 
For Rent 



A- Ingleslde -A- 

J **300.°° t 

■A Security Deposit A 

* on -a* 

* One &Tno Bedrooms* 

J 'Spacious 7 

£ 'Private Balconies 7 

^ 'Short term leases avail, ^ 

J Lakeview J 
J Apartments J 

* (708)587-9277 J 

<A* 'waffled applicants, iyr tease A" 



tmmmmttmmxmm 



I STATIONSIDE J 
VILLAGE 

| 5215 11TH AVENUE 
KENOSHA, Wl 

Luxurious Living ', 

Apartments & Townhouscs 

Z Bedrooms - 2 Baths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available 

Elevators 

No Pets 

Call (414) 656-1010 

litii n t t i 



WESTWIND 

VILLAGE 
APART.VIEOTS 

2200 Lewis Are., Zlon 
RENTING FROM $395 

Appliances - Custom Blinds 

On-site Miroger 

No Pets 

(708) 746-1420 

(708) 731-1804 

or Bear Property 

Management 
(414)697-9616 



•Microwave Ovens 

•Dishwashers 

•Washers & Dryers 

•Vaulted Ceilings 

•Patios or Balconies 

•Convenient Location 

(708) 356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

On Route 132 (Q rand Ave.) 

just east ol Route 03 al Die 

south side ol Deep Lake 

Pnhmkmttf 
*f^± tuugtdty 

\£j Uawgumn 

tmelfPtrtmn 







Antioch's 

finest 2 bedroom 

apartments, 

t bath or 1 1/2 baihs. 

Balcony or paiio. 

Extra storage. 

No Pets. % 

Ask about senior 

citizen incentives 

Military clause. 

RenlWrnuac. 

(708)838-0655 

Anita 
4 Terrace d 

!liij.ji,irl 



520 



Apartmcots 
For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



■^ 



WAUKEGAN 

One bedroom, heat 

Included. New carpet & 

paint, quiet building, no 

pels. $450/mo.Onemo. 

security deposit required 

(708) 939-0970 j 



<^ 



Check this 

Section Each. 

Week!! 



MUNDELE1N 

Spacious, lovdy 1 & 2 
bedroom apartments. 

Secure building. 
'Manager on premises. 

Laundry facilities. 
Available immediately. 
^Minutes lo shopping. 
CALL 

S(708) 566-2700^ 




• 



[Water's Edge Apartments! 

October 1 Bedroom Special 

1 month FREE Rent 

•FREE gas heat, cooking & water 
•Spaciously designed apartments 
•Patio or balcony available 

290 S. Rte. 59 - Fox Lake ^. 

(708)587-6888 t=t 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



530 



Rooms For Kent 



LAKE VILLA. NEW HOME 
CONSTRUCTION. Garage 
space Included. Male/Female. 
Non-smoter. $400/month, al 
ulllrles excluding telephone. 
(708) 26S-07B5. 

ROOMMATE WANTED. 

$425/month, Includes ulilties. 
Preferrabty employed. First 
months rent and half security 
required. Ask for Tony. (708) 
587-1701 after 4pm. 



WAUCONDA FURNISHED 

ROOM, klchen privileges; In 
lake side home. S70A*. (706) 
526-7891. 



Business Property 
For Sale 




Jl Rooms For Rent 



ROOM FOH RENT. Wlnth- 
rop Harbor, use ot klchen priv- 
ileges. References required. 
$400/rr»nth, plus $400 depos- 
1.(708)746^4550. 

ROUND LAKE Beach -laun- 
dry and kHchen facfllfes In- 
cluded 585/Week. available 
now, references required 
(708) 740-3309. 



534 



BHBOBHaOHraOHHHBrl 

I CAR LOT] 

Brick Bldg.on" *| 
g Rt 12, Richmond. | 
g I Bay, office, garage [■ 
g & storage. Excellent jj 
g visibility. Alternate S 

E use OK. $695/mo. I 

n 
n 



ID 



jg Land Namnt g 

E 815-678-4771 S 

D rj 

naHBDaajBOHHOHHyii 



We've Got Your 
New Home! 

Check the Real 

Estate Section of 

the Classifieds 



#¥£i||3 




Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 323-8161 




. *■ Mp* ■«•* pi i es-aw<a»iiB*^ tt ««s «fr *rM**» 



■f^fwnwiri^w 



V-— --u*/-£^Si 



OcrobER 7, 1 994 UkElANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 






Cars for Stfe 



WW; 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



GURNEE-LIQHT INDUS- 
TRIAL, 3,300sq.tt.,. at $4tt. 
Call Property Management 
Plua tT08) 244^6155. 

WILDWOOD AREA, AIR 

conditioned, office lor lease 
I.OOOsq.fl., newly decorated, 
available Seplamber 15, Call 
loday. f708) 223-8681. 

I Downtown main street V 



Professional/Medical 
Up to 1200 S.F. plus 
Large lobby, storage 

(708)566-2252 



t 

i 

r 

i 

i 

v 



560 



Vacant tot/Acreage 



McHENRY COUNTY, 

GIANT OAKS A HOWE 

RD., 2-172-8CTO3. 165X636. 
55^000^(7081960-0978. 

NATIONAL LISTING SERVICE 
• AMERICAN UNO LIQUIDA- 
TORS Lots, homesites, and 
acreage. For Sale By Owners 
across the country. Call for 
FREE lists. Buyers: 1-800- 
480-009.0 ' Sellers - 1- 
18001364-6612 



• ACRES NMHE 



•Zoned R-6 Hultj-Fimit)' 

•Maximum of- 168 Units 

•Close to Shopping, 
Transportation and 
Great lakes Nival Base 

Ralph 
DcPasqiMto 

Grubb & Ellis 




GnibtkDiia (708) 390-8050 

I X«tt: 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



NAPLES, FLORIDA 

Spend Christmas In A Tropical 
Paradise Overlooking The Gulf 01 
Mextaol New 4bdrm, 4blh home, 
den, w/2 screened porcnes. Slop 
out on the beautiful white sands ol 
Bortlta Beach. tS ml, south of FL 
Myers/avail November, December 
& April. $5,000 per mo. 

813-643-3100/813-643-2988 




Out Of Area 

Property 



NORTH CAROLINA 

WILMINGTON AREA 

Specializing in coastal proper- 
ties & Landfall. Investment & 
Retirement. Call Emetine Keith, 
INTRA COASTAL REALTY, 1 
800-533-1 840 for color 
brochure, further Info. & details. 



EASTERN IOWA 

Jackson Co. 254 ao., 14S tillable 
rec. farm, attractive Mississippi 
view on long ridge So. ot 
Bellevue. 503 «c. hilltop farm 
w/CRP, 64Q0K. 2B0 ac. hilltop 
(arm. Iffi tillable. S296K. Mclnryre 
Realtors. Call Martin Menders, 
319-773-2403 or 3l£5S&-1600. 
Other props, also avail. 



WISCONSIN 

5b r, Gbth, 2 story greek revival 
completely renovated bed & 
breakfast with bam. Located In 
central Wisconsin. $290,000 
Call Bettle Smith, REALTY 
WORLD SHAMBEAU & LYONS, 
715-258-9565 for details. . 



OJL - Newton County 

Kentucky Style Horse Farm. 27 
stall bam, 27.5 acs. cross fenced. 
2 story home w/rTnlshed bsmt 
ONE OF A HINDI Near swimming 
4 tennis. $396,000. Call Jessie 
Smith. 404-4834772 or 404-483 
3304, PAR REALTY, INC., or Gene 
Smith, 404-483-3931. 



OR-RURAL PORTLAND 

By Owner. 3800. s.f. cus- 
tom home, 6.4 ac, 3 story 
4br. 4bth, 2 fplcs, htd 
pool, 3600 s.f., workshop, 
$309,500. Call 503-661 
4286 for Info. & details. 



568 



Oat Of Area 
Property 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

EAST CENTRAL FARMLAND 

867 acs. excel, com, soybean, 
wheatland. 348.5 ac com base, 
65 ac. wheat base, 14x60 mobile 
homo. Excel, wildlife habitat, good 
fail hunting. Possibly could irrigate 
650 acs. S650K. By Owner. Eves. 

' 605-693-4094 



WA. POULSBO 

Classic "69 Corvette (both tops) + 
18 yr. old newly remod. 3500 s.l. 
futn'd home on 3 pvt ac. Overlooks 
Hood Canal. Extensive landscape, 
fruit trees, garden, 2 dot garages, 
yd & garden equip. 1/2 hr. ferry to 
Seattle, S365K. Owner, 206-697- 
6926 for Info. & details. 



FLA. JUPITER HILLS 

Golf Course Properties 
Available, Homesites & cus- 
tom homes, new & resale. 
Please call the sales office 
at -Jupiter Hills Village 
Realty, Inc. 

407-746-1000 



MO. • Cettte farm. 681 +/- acs. 
Pasture, hay, timber. Will run 150 +/- 
units. Cross fenced, 3br rock farm 
house, exc, cond, S332K. Also; 
2000 sq. ft brick home overlooking 
40 ac lake on 275 secluded acs. ad|. 
to 13,000 ac State Park. CENTU- 
RY 21 SOUTH CENTRAL REALTY. 
Call Wanda Parks. 1-800-737-6121 
tor details. 



•ARKANSAS OZARKS 

CA style custom home on six 
beautiful acres ol White River 
frontage. Private dock, seduded, 
gated. One-of-a-kind quality 
property, S289K. Free Video. 
CENTURY 21 HOWARD'S 
REALTY, 1 -800649-2096. 



SOUTHEAST 

MISSOURI 

Corp^mfiv. Retreat 370 ac, 100 mi, 
So. ot St Louis. 225 In pasture, rest 
in marketable timber. Good for farm 
or recreation. 1 1/4 ml. river 
frontage. State land connecting 
9000 ac. Good for hunting & fishing. 
S375K. By Owner. 314-495-2250. 



IA..- Relocation/Retreat 

6.6 beautiful acs. w/woeds & 
nature trails, smalt cozy home, 
nicely landscaped, gazebo, 
great foe. , 3 ml. Cedar Rapids, 
$300 K. By Owner. 

Call 319-362-4640 
for Info & details 



WILDERNESS CREEK FRONT- 
AGE, $19,900; WATERS- 
MEET LAKE, boat to Eagle 
River, only $27,900; HUNT- 
ING ACREAGE, borders Nat") 
forest. $9,700; SCATTERING 
RICE LAKE, get on the quiet 
side of the chain! $57,900. 
NEWLY CONSTRUCTED 

MODEL HOME, private lake, 
hurry, the last one sold in 2 
days, $77,450. FOUR SES- 
ONS REALTY MINOCQUA 1- 
800-648-6933. 

FREE COLOR BROCHURE OF 
LAKE PROPERTY BARGAINS 
IN TENNESSEE! Wooded. 
Beautiful views. Paved roads 
w/utilities. Price from $7,500. 
Excellent financing. Call In- 
dian. Shadows Today. 800- ' 
239-8323, ext. 11 86. 

FINAL CLOSEOUTl Save 
thousands on Lake Berkley, 
KY bargains, 1.5 acres from 
$7,900. Nicely -wooded 
w/lake access, near state 
park. On country rd w/utils & 
protectiove covenants. Lake- 
front also available. Perfect 
for vacation retirement. Excel- 
lent financing. • Limited f 
remain, call now 1-800-858- 
1323, ext 1891. Woodland 
Acres. 8:30-8:30. 7 days. 




704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1986 FOXFIRE 40FT. 
TRAVEL TRAILER. 

SLEEPS-7, FULLY CON- 
TAINED. EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. MANY EX- 
TRAS. $7,90O/BEST. 
(706) 397-6678. 

DODGE 1876 CLASS C 
MOTOR HOME, 24ft. fully 
self-contained, 87k miles, 
overhauled at 65k miles. Eve- 
rything in good working condl- 
Uon. S6.500. (414) 694-3971. 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



720 



Sporti Equipment 



END OF SEASON- BAR- 
GAIN. 22fl. Layton travel, trail- 
er. Excellent condition. $5,800. 
(708) 395-7997. 



708 



SaomttMca/KWs 



SNOWMOBILE, 1093 Arc- 
tic Cat EXT-580Z.wtlh ex- 
tras, $3,700/best. (708) 
973-0314. 

SNOWMOBILE, PON- 

TOON. AND JET SKI 
TRAILERS BY TRITON. 

Check my prices. Dan's Surf & 
Turf.T-800-646-2744. 



MOUNTAIN BIKE 10-speed, 
fairly new, all new parts. $100. 
(414) 551-9497 ask torTla. 

SKATEBOARD 1/2 pip*. 

4R. high x 8ft. wide x 25ft. long, 
llko now condition, $3S0rt>est. 
Adam (708) 949-7432. 




804 


CarsforSale 



710 



BoalrMotort/Etc. 



PONTOONS, BASS 
& FISHING BOATS 

Complete 6 final 
tot" clearance 6' 

liquidation- New 6 used. 
No reasonable offer 

refined. Save hundreds, 
even thousands) 

Wooduhd Pier I 

(414)534-5264 



19U FOUR WINNS, 160 
Freedom, 130 I/O, traler. Ga- 
rage kept. $5,700*08*. (708) 
587-7488 

SUNFISH SAILBOAT, ex- 
cellent condition, like new, 
$975. (708) 223-1395. 

WINTER STORAGE PAID! 

27ft.7ln. Concorde Express 
Cruiser. Sleeps-6, galley, hot 
water, twin 318*, haJer-radto, 
depth Under, sum log. Must 
oett due to Illness. 12,0O0Vbest. 
(312) 478-5200. 



1978 Z-28, 454 nitrous, au- 
tomatic, Candy Maroon, black 
Interior, Posl. - $5,000/be3t. 
(708) 546-1918. 

AUDI 1988 QUATRO 90 

SERIES, 5-cyllnder, AWD, 
ABS, leather, power package. 
Classic luxury In mint conoV 
lion. $12,000. (708) 223-4023 

afterepm. 

BERETTA 1994 Z 28. 

Power windows and locks. 
Transferable extended war- 
ranty and manufacturer. Pur- 
sul Keyless Car Alarm, V6. 
19,000 mles. Asking $15,500. 
(708) 263-5389, Monday-Frl- 
day 6prh-9:30pm. Saturday- 
Sunday anytime. 

BMW 1987 325I convert- 
ible, Apple Red, Tan Interior. 
Kenwood stereo. MM oondF 
lion. Must sell. $14,000/hegotr- 
able. (708) 295-7591, 

BUICK 1984 CENTURY 
LIMITED, V-6, runs good. 
$9506est. (414) 654-0930. 

BUICK 1965 REGAL. White 
with Burgundy Interior. Runs. 
Greatl $l,000A>est. Call after 
4:30pm or leave message. 
(708)973-0149. . 



CHEVY 1992 CAVALIER, 

22,000 miles, 2-door, au- 
tomatic, air,' 5-speed, excel- 
lent condition. $7,500, (708) 
336-9257. after 4:30pm. 

CHRYSLER 1984 LASER 
TURBO. Damaged rear 
quarter, 75,000 miles, stan- 
dard shift, noeds work. $850. 
(414) 654-7882. . 

CHRYSLER 1988 LaBAR- 
ON CONVERTIBLE, 4-cylln- 
der Turbo, 79,000 miles. 
$8,300Jbost. (708) 526-7751. 

DODGE 1984 OMNt, 4- 
door hatchback. Very reliable 
and good running condition, 
$600. (708) 740-4240 even- 
ings only. 

FIREBIRD 1991, t-tops, 
loaded, excellent condition, 
$9,S00A>eBt. (414) 862-6518. 

FORD 1970 MUSTANG 
GRANDE, 302, 2- V engine, 
restoration nearly complete. 
Call for detals, after 5pm Mon- . 
Frl. Weekends anytime. (815) 
344-1574 Wayne 

CHEVY 1986 CAMARO. 

Excellent condition. $2,300. 
(708) 497-4889-Tom. - 

CHEVY 1967 STATION 
WAGON, 8-passenger, air, 
power steering, anvTm, clean 
car. $3,500/best. (70S) 
336-2599. ; . 

CHEVY 1968 CAMARO, T- 

tops, New; motor, exhaust, 
and battery. $2,700/best. 
(708) 023-8739. 

BUICK 1988 LeSABRE, 

full power, 4-door, . am/fm 
cassele. high miles, marroon, 
$3,500A)est. (708) 623-5181. 

CHEVROLET 1980 MALI- 
BU, 4-door, V8, automatic, air, 
$650. (414) 843-2864. 



MGTD GAZELLE 1930 rep- 
lica kfl car, brand new atll In 
crate, $4.500. (414) 643-3953. 

MUSTANG 1986, Excellent 
condition. Low miles. Extra, 
extra clean, $3,000. (708) 
487-4880-Tom. 

NISSAN 1887 2O0SX-XE, 

4-cytlnder, 5-speed, .power 
sleerlng, power brakes, ak, tit 
cruiser, anvlm, High highway 
miles. $1,600/best. (708) 
587-1693. _^^^ 

NISSAN STANZA 1968. 

New: battery, tires, exhaust 
and alternator. Dependable, 
120,000 miles. Needs dutch 
$500mego1lable. (708) 497- 
3903. 

OLDSMOBILE 1983 CUT- 
LASS BROUGHAM. Clean 

inside and out, new molor. 
Asking $4,000A>eBt. (414) 
551-7341. 

PONTIAC 1690 SUNBIRO. 

Air, cruise, til, aluminum rims. 
good condttfon, $4,000. (414) 
654-1563 after 5pm. 

CHEVY 1984 CAVALIER, 

automatic, power steering and 
brakes, am/fm stereo, tilt 
wheel, 4-cyltnder, 2-door. 
Looks great, runs great. 
$89&best. (708) 549-0901. 

OMNI GLH TURBO 1965, 

good condition, 120k, lots of 
new parts, rebuilt trans, spd 
shsTter, have receipts for eve- 
rything! FASTI 5.0 EATERI 
$2,000*681 (708) 018-8162 
after,4PM. . 



PONTIAC 1976 BONNE- 
VILLE. Full power, new Ikes, 
California car. $2,500. (706) 
855-9722 alter 5pm. 

PLYMOUTH 1997 HORI- 
ZON. Good condition. Best 
Offer. (708) 872-0453. - 




RIVIERA 1965, $2,000. 

Call after 4pm. (706) 
746-1430. ' 

TOYOTA 1963 TERCEL 
WAGON, hatchback, ALL 
WHEEL DRIVE, good condi- 
tion, power steering/brakes, 
velour Interior, $1,500. (706) 
395-2345 ask for Mike. 



TOYOTA 198S CELICA 

GT. Hatchback, red, sun- 
roof, automatic, 08k, excellent 
condition. Ain/lm cassette, 
power windows, locks, steer- 
ing, cruise, lltt. S3,000/best. 
(708) 336-9111. Leave mes- 
sage. 



*U.C. Us First* 

WHATEVER 
ITT/IKES! 

More$$for 
your trade, etc. 

OLDSMOBILES 

HYUNDAI'S 



1«iTMUDGllnRMCE 
ftflMKIW 

Demo Progmm I Edge Cm 
* 85 Used Cars in Stock* 

Marquardt 



<Xf- 



»'!■ 



On RL 41 it 

Washington St., East exit 

Gumee, IL 

* (708) 249-1 300* 



JON BOATS, DUCK 

SKIFFS, PADDLE 
BOATS & CANOES 

Factory Outlet 
\ Hnal fall clearance 
5 liquidation. 
Save Hundreds! 

Wooduhd Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



MERCURY & FORCE 
01TTB0ARDS 

Complete 6 final fall 

clearance 6 liquidation 

No reasonable offer 

refused. All sizes. 

Rush - save hundreds 

b even thousands) 

Wooduhd Pier I 

(414) 534-5264 



1974 MARLIN, 168., 140hp 
VO. roier traler. Many extras. 
MUST SELL! (706) 215-7506 
Kevin. 



Sears 7hp. outboard 
motor, shallow water 
drive. Like Newt Only 
$400. Call Now, this 
will go quick! I 

(708)2684246 

after 5:30 p.m. 

MfnrCondiiton 

Accessories included 



718 



Travel/Vacation 



SeaChase Free Funday on the 
Gulf of .Mexico. Four nights 
for the price ot three; through 
December 31. Furnished 
luxury beachfront condos. 
Call 1-800-623-2409. Orange 
Beach, Alabama. 
GOT A CAMPGROUND MEM- 
BERSHIP OR TIMESHARE? 
WE'LL TAKE IT. AMERICA'S 
MOST SUCCESSFUL RESORT 
RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. 
CALL RESORT SALES IN- 
FORMATION TOLL FREE 
HOTLINE 1-800-423-5967. 




IT'S JUST 

POSSIBLE 
YOUYE 

READ THIS 
PAPER 

BEFORE. 



Because this 

newspaper 
uses recycled newsprint whenever 
it can. 

Recycled newsprint is just one 
of many useful products made 
from old newspapers. Recycling 
keeps the newspaper you're read- 
ing from the landfi I. And it helps 
us all to save money. 

So, after you read, 
recycle. 

And we'll do 
our part. We'll 
use it again. 




«1 




CLASSIFIED UI<eIan<I Newspapers Octoder 7, 1994 



Transportation 



804 



Cars for Sale 



814 



Service & Puts 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



844 



Motorcycles 



844 



Motorcycles 



804 



Cars For Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



] 



FORD 1BB2 THUNDER- 
BIRD, 250 straight 6. Many 
new parts. $900. (708) 223- 
B622. 

FORD TAURUS, 19BB- 4 
cylinder, 118,000 mltos, runs 
good, most options. $3,300 or 
best . (706)272-3337. 

HONDA 1990 ACCORD 
EX, 4-rJoor, air, power wind- 
ows and locks, am/lm cas- 
sette, power sun-root, 46k 
miles. One Owner, $10,000. 
(708) 223-6487. 



LEXUS SC300, 

1992.BLACK w/Jvory leather, 
sun root, CD, tuHy loaded. 14k 
miles. Excellent Condition. 
$29,500(708) 548-1340. 

MERCURY 1977 COU- 
GAR, runs excellent, new 
paint, new brakes. $975*ost. 
(708) 330-5468. 

MERCURY 1987 SABLE 
WAGON, am/tm cassette, all 
power, air conditioning, now 
brakes, 115k highway miles, 
good condition, $2,950.(708) 
223-5873. 



TOYOTA 1986 COROLLA, 

4-door, automatic, power 
steering and brakes, air condi- 
tioning. Immaculate, $3,980, 
(708) 244-5488 ask tor Don- 
nls. 

TOYOTA 1988 TERCEL, 1- 
owner, power steering and 
brakes, automatic, air, am/lm 
storeo cassotto, 2-door. Very 
good condition. $2,850Aest. 
(708) 6C9-B794 

THIUMPH 1980 TR7, 
49,000 original miles. 
$3,000/tlrm. (708) 356-1037 
ask for Kim. 



CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE Mustang, Camera, 
Nova, Chevelle, Cutlass, 
Mopars, Pontlac, Chevrolet, 
morel TRUNK PANS, FLOOR 
PANS, DOORS, FENDERS, 
BUMPERS. New arid Califor- 
nia Rust Free. MARK'S 
PLATING & SUPPLY 217-824- 
6184 



824 


, Vans 



CHEVY 1988 SUBURBAN 
4x4, good for work or tow, 
20,000 miles on newer en- 
glne. $2.800. (708) 356-6545. 

GMC JIMMY SLE 1992, 

fully loaded. Asking $18,250 or 
best offer (414) 854-0559 
(414)654-8312. 

JEEP COMANCHE 1990, 
4x4, custom wheels, top, 
amflm CD, $7,900. (708) 
546-8018 




Trucks/Trailers 



814 



Service & Puts 



•*, 




CHRYSLER 360 eflglne, 
1974 model, rebuilt, $500. 
( 708) 680-4504 after 4pm. 

MOTOR, 4-CYLINDER, 

2.3, complete, from 1988 
Ford Tompo. Guaranteed to 
run. $450. Will deliver. (414) 

643-3658. 



DODGE RAM CONVER- 
SION VAN 1992, VB, 

wheelchair accessible, au- 
tomatic wheelchair Ml for 1 
person to handle alone 
$25,250/bost (414) 654-0559 
(414)654-8312. 



PLYMOUTH 19B6 VOYAG- 
ER, lots of miles, but I stIH look 
good and donl drink or smoke 
oil. Hearth and a younsterl 
(708) 356-5712. , 



FORD 1978 TRUCK, 350 
engine, wtlh crew cab, body 
and engine good condition. 
$2,6O07best. (414) 843-2509. 

GMC 1994 SIERRRA 2500 
pick-up 4x4, 2-tone paint, 
loaded, with Unl-Mount West- 
em snowplow, never used, 
20,000 highway miles, garage 
kept. Mush sol due to health, 
$22,0001)081. (815) 344-5185 
after 6pm. 



HONDA 1994 CBR-600, 

exeellont condition, under 
2,000 miles, $6,000/best. 
(708)356-9591. 

MOTORCYCLE 1992 SU- 
ZUKI DR350, like new condi- 
tion, loW trifles. Purchased 
new In 1993. $2,500. (414) 
843-4173. 

MOTORCYCLE 1994 Mag- 
na, V4, 7500C, lots of chrome, 
lemon yehow. Must sell due to 
financial problems. WRI make 
deal. Sacrlllce for $6,000. 
(708) 546-5420 Scott. 

YAMAHA 1987 MOPED, 

250 original miles, $550*est. 
i70B) 548-4928. 




! WEDNESDAY 10 A.M. < 

Is the deadline for 

classified ads! 

(708) 223-8161 



MINT CONDITION 

1979, 850 CS Dresser 

Suzuki Motorcycle 

Includes all accessories 

helmets, storage cover 

and morel 

Only 25,000 original miles 

A Must See! 
Only $1,500 

Call (708) 265-0246 
after 5:30 p.m. ■ 





4 
Howe Studio 

Award-winning photographer ready 

to capture your special moments for 

Wedding, Portrait Glamour & Portfolios. 

Call (70S) 360-9209 
far an appointment 

GURNEE 



North Point 

A POWER EQUIPMENT 

j\ 8il 'Sheridan Road A Winthrop Harbor, IL 60096 

ry (708)872-1204 

Lawn & Garden Equipment Sales, Service & Rentals 
Commercial & Residential Equipment 
A Tuneups ; A Repairs A Overhauls 

A Accessories A Parts Sharpening 

Pick up &free delivery available 




Protect Now 

Before Winter 

Weather 

Damage! 



IW*-* 



" II 



\ 



!*=??•' 



WE SEAL DRIVEWAYS 



...and small parking Sots 

•Seal Coating •Patchwork -Crack Filling 

Protect and Preserve • Reasonable rates. Call for a FREE estimate 

(708) 740-4051 or (708) 356-1011- 

AMERICAN SBALCOATING BY GEORGE 



L 



W*A* SOD FARM 

Wisconsin Grown & Inspected 

#1 Kentucky Bluegrass Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forklift Delivered 

Phoott (114)195-2725 
FAX: (114)195-7481 



SCHNEIDER III 
BUILDERS 

Addition *Kt & Baths rtmodtltd 

>Gvipi •Dormtn 

'Hmdyman Strvkcs •Free Deiigm 
•Custom Bui Dtdu and Gaitbo 
FREE Estimates 
CaU Toby at 

I (13 8) 540-411 ■ 



jf%Sh Duraclean 

Rated best by 
Independent tests 




Get It DONE before winter! 
CaU 

The Contractors Network 

Hundreds of Contractors checked-out 
and ready to work for you! 

FINDERSsm 

(708) 548-3463 

Referrals are FREE! 



.E&A 

I HOME IMPROVEMENT | 

Kitchens • Baths •Decks 
Room Additions ; 

NO JOB TOO SMALL 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 526-3976 



Carpet & 
Furniture 
Cleaning 
CALL 
TODAY! 




/"" BUYING 

1 Aluminum Cans 

♦COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
'LEAD 'ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708)587-0788 

-or- 

1000 Rand Rd(Rt. 12), Unit 212 

Wauconda, IL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Fri. 

9 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Closed 12-12:30 



DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

MerionlExteriots • ffiEE ESTIMATES 

Insured Quality Work 
References - Top Line Material 

WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call 
(708) 566-1002 



FREE SERVICE 



CONTRACTOR REFERRALS FOR ANY CONSTRUCTION NEED: 



. Additions 

• Basements 

• Bathrooms 

• Decks 
Electrical 



• Healing/Air 

• KHchens 

• Landscape 

• Painting 
Plumbing 



• Remodels 

• Roofing 

• Siding 

• Windows 

• And More., 



Call Homeowner'* Rofoml Service, Inc. tor Quality Contractors you can Count Onl 

|Wl Contractor* re fe r re d ere.- 

BAdaquateJy Licensed; 61 Insured; B Reputable; : : 
^Referenced; Established for Fh» Yeers 



Homrovt tiers Kctcridl Ni>r\iu\ Inc. 
LHOO-Ub-RIMR 1 -800-467 3 J J7 





SEAMLESS ALUMINUM GUTTERS, 
ALUMINUM SIDING, TRIM, SOFFIT, FASCIA 



im ii ii ii iiniii i m ii m i mm 



HOME 



SENIORS CITIZENS 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH 

INSURED 22 COLORS FREE ESTIMATES 

FAMILY OWNED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE LOCAL REFERENCES 
JOHN GEBERT LEAVE MESSAGE AT (7 08)587-8772 



HOME TYPIST LOOKING 
FOR ADDITIONAL WORK 

MASS MAILINGS : 

Have a letter thai needs to be 

sent to everyone? i have the 

| computer set-up. 2 day turnaround 

depending on volume. Have 

additional requests, just askl 



CALL BRENDA AT 

414-248-1589 




•Driveways 

•Resurfacing 
•Repairs 
•Parking Lobs 
•Seal Coating 



Residential Specialists 
Bonded and insured 

FREE ESTIMATES 
I (I08) *4*-#858 
; (815)144-8410 

imimniniMimnmmm 






SWING VOVM FAINTING 

AND DBCOMATING NEEDS. 

Complete Inurior/Eitario* 

Abo Munli/QiaUBi Wodt 

Qiialiiy Wok -Needy Done 

FREE Estimates 

AgordabU Prica 

Have the jo© done nam" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24Hr.M*uaf 



4 4 * * 4 4 44 44 4444444444444 

1 LAWNWORKS I 

* IT'S THAT TIME OF YEAR - FALL CLEANUP 4 



4 Retainer Walls • Boulder 'Timber • Flagstone 

4 • Fall Planting 4tt3fl&» *Walkways or Patios 

Your choice of <$E£Muk Brick or Flagstone 
shrubs or trees "" 



4 
4 
4 




4 NO JOB TOO SMALL 

444 44444 444 44 4444 4 4444 4 



•Reasonable Rates 
Call Dennis Adams 

708-546-3231 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



r * 



OcToben 7, 1994 LfthlANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 





READINGS BY LISA 



She has the power to help people of all 
walks. Donl fall to see this gtfiod lady. She 
will tell past, present and fulure without you 
even uttering a word. She does not talk to 
please, but tells the truth. One visit wUI 
convince you that she Is a superior reader. 

She gives advice on all facts of life, 
love, marriage, etc., and also reunites 
the separated. She will succeed where 
others have lalled. 

Special!. $40 readings are now $10. 
Call now for appointment. 
. 706-616-7864 




T & C METAL CO. 

We racyclo aluminum cant! 



We alto buy 
•Copper •Brau 
•Aluminum Siding 
•Auto Radiators 

Buy ore of non-fer;<xis metals. 
Industrial accounts welcome, 



•Insulated Wire 
■•lead •Stainless 
•Batteries -Zinc 
• Catalytic Converters 

370 Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake, IL 



615-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 3-1 



1 Block S. of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 




FLOORS U WALK ON, inc. 



'Carpet* • Hardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen * Balfaroon Bemodellng 

R-Ummttml A Cojmmrtiml liuudtmtim 

ALL WORK GVARANlEiD 

Estimates 
3562500 
{708)310-5220 




Helmut Mayer 

Roofing all types and repairs. 

Skylights resealed and leaks fixed. 

Interiors Exterior Painting, Staining, 

and Varnishing. Gutters cleaned and 

repaired. Pressure washing. Tuck Pointing 

Insured Free Estimates 

(708) 526-6789 



A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 



CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC. 

LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS ft CONTRACTORS 
Strewg Lakt CounU/Sotu 1960 
•Computer Design .•Seeding 
•Flagstone Patios 'Sodding 
•Stone Walls •Ranting 

•Texture Gardens 'Grading 

(708)746-8953 



A 

A 

A 

A 

aV 

A." 

A' 

A 

A- 

A. 



A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 






Ma id in a m irk a 



CLEANING SERVICE 

String molt eftht war and far itbutbtfor aver 23 yean. 

Daily-Weekly-Bi-WeeUy and Monthly rate Available 

'. FreeEsrJrniet • Gift Certificates Available 

We DO Windows • Trained, Bonded, Insured 

and English Speaking Staff 

Phone (70S) 546-2588 • Fax (708) 546-2601 

1427 Cedar lake Rotd 

Rouad Lake Bach, IL 60973 



Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Round Like Park 



Ram Rental 




AURSEN & 
LACKMAN% 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 

you Can j^ Free Estimates 

***<*£» (708) 838-5300 





***************** 

* HAIR CUTS by * 

* FREDDIE'S II * 

J "Your Neighborhood * 

Barber Shop" J 

J Comer of Washington J 

7 & Lewis, Waakegao J 

v 8:30am- 5:00pm Tuss.-Frlday. J" 

* 8:30am • 3:00pm Saturday * 

* (708)249-2264 * 

* •Fied Hlousek J 

jl Proprietor jl. 

<& 5 minutes from Great America * 
***************** 




BEEPERS 




Salts A Service 

MOTOROLA 
BRAVO 



J':S: ';••■ Free Deflyery 

• AJ Connect Cneroes 

• One Month Aaibne • Morel oeff 

Action Beeper Corp. 
54O"9tw0 

(SOO)47e-Ttte RMriUk* 



4 

4 

4 

4 
"4 

4 
v,< 

•4 



•CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS 
'CARACE SUBS 
•EXPOSED AGGREGATE PATIOS 
•WOOD DECKS 



y, 



GURNEE QUALITY 
CONST. CO., INC 

'LOCALLYOWNED AND OPERATED* 
(708)621*2965 
(708) 7604481 



■*> 



■gMmmpm 



Caps, Shirts, Jackets, and other 

Holiday Business Gift Items. 

Order Early and Save! 



NOW! 



Porcelain Coffee Mugs as Low as $1.19 Each 

with your Advertising Imprint. 

Call Now and Save! 

ITEMS and IDEAS (708)438-7488 

oenn 



LANDSCAPING SPECIALIST 

RESEED, PLANT TREES & 

SHRUBS FOR A 

BEAUTIFUL SPRING 

(wood decks & brick patios, tool 

BUDGET 
LANDSCAPING 

PATIOS & 

DESIGNER 

DECKS 

(708) 838.2101 




I let U^lto typing, I 
lnvcfrt«y, Boetteeptofr Etc. | 

FULL OR PART TIME 

May we meet wHh you 

and talk oyer your needs? 

We think we con bo of assistance 

The Business Puce 

Virginia Johnson 

P.O. Box 27, Round Lake, IL 600734027 

(708) 546-4510 



Fine 
Homes 




FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr.old Seasoned Hardwood. 

Oak, Maple, Ash, Cherry. 

$59.00 per face Cord. 

(1/3 of full Cord) 

.Free Stacking & Delivery. 

"Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn " 

(708) 546-3613 

■BBBaaaaBaaaaaBBaaaaaai 



***************** 

$• lull's KwmSwur; 
*Stoia«i Special ** 

J Any size boat trailer -or- * 
jl 2 snowmobiles on trailer £ 
* '2S.OO asew — .ailla * 



$ (708| 5S7-9100 J 
* IOW RATES! + 

* $12.00 per ft. 20' or under * 

* $13.00 per ft. 21' or over * 

* Cars, RVs, etc. * 
***************** 



1 Bale or 1,000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north State Line RcL 

East of Hwy. 45 on County Trunk CJ 

MORTON BROS. 

• Bristol, Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon. - Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 . 

emmmsttmmmm»mmmmimmmmmm 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



by 

Paul Zasadil 



•New Homes 
•Additions . 



Renovations 
Carpentry 

(708)566-4724 



a 
a 
a 




TUpperware 



(8 



a 
a 
a 



g-NEW FALL CATALOQ-g 

LOTS OF NEW ITEMS 



a 

B 



a 
a 



Call to request a catalog, g 



place an order or 
date a party, 



a 
a 



a 

a 
a 

a Please call Phaedra Weiler a 

g (708) 662-2878 g 

■aaBBaaaaaaaBBBBaaaaaBa 



ft 
* 



<$&«(!&;»(£&«([&«($&«<££•©([ 



PSYCHIC CARD READING 

ByLeetfarris 

Card*, Palms, Character Readings, 

Advice on All Problem* of Life Such As Love, Marriage, 

Business, Etc. Specializing in Reuniting Loved Ones, 

Removing Stumbling Blocks 

708/202-OS31 

ALSO AVAILABLE FOR PARTIES 



a 
ft 

ft 



$*at$*at<£at»$*a>5*9$*a$a 



S 



CALL WOlt ABIWEWNAL $MMViCE9 OWWEMMB 
WE THE PEOPLE BtlSINESS CENTER 
^- ■■ (708) 548-1300 f 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FORREPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33281 N. Highway 45 

Wlldwood, IL 80030 

(708| 223-8891 




GtStL Service 

Carkniky • EiicmcM 

PUIMBIN6 
All phases of home 
remodeling & repair 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 537-0937 





MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too Small. I'll Do It AH. 

•Remodeling 

Kitchens, Bathrooms & Rec Rooms 
•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

(Ml Types) 

•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work Ifiry Will Bm 

Pill Iff IMAflf,€AU 

(414)SS!-M3t 



'• 






( #'*r.r*-« ■ *h». *• 



. „.„..» 



~»» 




CLASSIFIED UkclANd Newspapers OctoI>eii 7, 1994 



Pet Parade 




Warning! Bloat could be fatal to your dog 



Bloat otherwise known as gastric 
dilation and gastric torsion, Is a very 
serious problem. It occurs mainly In 
large, deep chested breeds, but any 
dog can be victimized by this 
problem. 

Bloat Is characterized by an 
enlarged abdomen. The stomach fills 
with air, gas, food and gastric 
secretions which cause painful 
distention. Bloat occurs when the 
distended and bloated stomach 
begins to rotate or twist, closing off all 
openings to the stomach; The 
contents of the stomach then have 
nowhere to go which causes further 



enlargement. 

As the dilation Increases, breathing 
becomes more rapid, the dog Is 
writhing In pain. Is trying to vomit and 
cant, and cannot find a comfortable 
position. The critical factor Is time. You 
must get your dog to a veterinarian 
quickly as you have about 20 to 30 
minutes to save the life of your 
companion. This Is serious business, a 
real medical emergency requiring 
Immediate veterinary care, possibly 
surgery to untwist the stomach. 

Prevention Is always better than - a 
cure. You should always look for: a 
distended abdomen, retching dry 



heaves, drooling, depression or any 
sign of abdominal discomfort. 

•Feed your larger dogs two or 
three smaller meals each day rather 
than one large meal. 

•Avoid vigorous exercise for two 
hours after meals. 

•Umlt water consumption following 



meals to moderate amounts. Do not 
allow excessive drinking of water. 
Larger animals take In a lot of air with 
water. 

editor's note: Copy submitted 
Cathie Sabln K B. C. Dog Training. 




RM Pets 



Puppies & Kittens 

AKC & Mixed Breeds 



m FOUR PAWS 

•+? TRAINING CENTER 
"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

All training methods are not alike. Coma visit us during classes and observe a dif- 
ferent approach to dog training. Our methods utilize food, enthusiasm and praisa, 
and exercises are broken down Into pieces both dogs and owners can manage. We 
have classes (or puppies and older dogs, and (or all levels ol obedtenco competi- 
tion (raining. For more information please give us a call, 

COURSE 

General Obedience : 



SCHEDULE NEXT TERM STARTS 



•Puppy Kindergarten 
•Basic Obedience 1 - 
•Basic Obedience It- 



Thu. 6:30 PM 
Thu. 7:30 PM 
ThU. 8:30 PM 



October 8 
October 6 
October G 



Competition Classes: 
Novice (CD Title) • Ved. 7:30 PM or Thu. 9 AM October 5 or October 6 



•Open (CDX Title) ■ 
•Utility (UD title) - 



Wed. 8:30 PM or Thu. 10 AM October 5 or October 6 
Wed 6:30 PM October 5 



•Classes In dog agility now available- 
20970 White Road * Antloch, IL 60002 • (708) 838-0523 



Help Curb Pet Overpopulation 
Problems. 



Spay 



fh4mmat m 

or Neuter 



Now!! 



Contact: 
Animal Protection 

P.O. Box 106 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708) 740-3977 




Vi/sl.i Chihuahua Lhasa Apso rprri.-r Mm 

Vorkio Groat Pekinese Lhasa Apso P"kinqi7sr> M>x 

Pekingoso Black Chihuahua ftali.Tr> Miniature G»ov'H>'ind 

Dalrnation Labrador Mm Keoshond 

niioctesian Ridgobnck 
* COMING FOR CHRISTMAS WEEK » 
Himalayan Kiltons 

2416 Washington - Waukegan 
(Kitty-comer from St. Thcrcsc Hospital) 

(708) 249-5444 



CANINE CLIPPERS We no* carry 

250 Center Street FrOfflffl-Ddg Food 

Grayslake, IL 60030 It's Flti Suson- 

(708) 223-5444 fin Y»„r Suppll.j Now! 

* IN STORE SPECIALS * 
Come in and look around 




Baby Parakeet Special 

*9.99 







■ 










Vf 



BC DOG TRAINING 

GROOMING & PET SUPPLY 

872 Tower Rd. 
Mundelein 708-566-1960 

OCTOBER EVENTS 

& Saturday October 8th 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm 

Park Shore Fun Match 

^Saturday October 15th 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 

Schipperke Specialty Show 

& Tuesday October 18th 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm 

Illini Doberman Meeting & 
Fun Raiser - Photo Clinic 

& Sunday October 23rd 9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

B.C. Dog Training Open House 

(Detail on Opposite Side) 

^Monday October 31st 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm 

Doggy Halloween Party! 



OPEN HOUSE 

SUNDAY OCTOBER 23RD 

9:00 am - 5:00 pm 

* RAFFLES 





Prizesfor 




• BEST DOG COSTUME 

• BEST HUMAN COSTUME 

• BEST DOG & HUMAN 
COSTUME THEME 



TUESDAY OCTOBER 11TH 
SATURDAY OCTOBER 22ND 
THURSDAY OCTOBER 27TH 




Win ^JFJREE% Obedience Classes, 

Agility Classes, Flyball Classes, 
Daycare Sessions 

6 OBEDIENCE RUN-THRU'S 

Novice, Open, Utility - FREE 
Judged by. an AKC Judge 

m ENTERTAINMENT 

Agility DentOS - You can also try your dog 

Ffyball DentOS - You can also try your dog 

Alex Rot ft acker - Demos by a Police K-9 
W- 00 * m Unit & the Amazing Olive Oil 

DOG FOOD MANUFACTURER REPS - 
FREE SAMPLES & GREAT DEALS! 

VETERINARIANS - 
T6 ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS 

Your Pets Are Welcome To Socialite*. 
Bring Your Friends! 



OcTobe* 7, 1994 LAkclAwl Newspapers CLASSIFIED 





Apple Tart 

Pastry; 

1 cup whole wheat flour 
6 Tbls. margarine or butter 

legg 

1/4 cup honey 

2 Tbls. milk 

Filling: 

1 Tbl. bread crumbs 

3/4 pound (2 medium-sized) cooking apples 

1/4 cup ralilns 

1/3 cup honey 

cinnamon 




Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Sift the flour Into a 
bowl and finely cut in the butter using a pastry cutter. 
Beat the egg slightly, put a little aside for the top of the 
tart, and add the rest, with 1/4 cup of honey, to the flour. 
Stir in enough milk to make a damp dough. Mix to a 
ball and leave to stand for 30 minutes. Gut the pastry 
ball in half, and roll out one half to form a pie crust 
Place in a pie pan and bake for IS minutes and bake for 
15 minutes at 400 degrees. 

Layer the bottom of the baked pastry shell with 
bread crumbs; then peel, core, and slice the apples into 
the baked pastry shell. Add the raisins and pour 1/3 cup 
of honey on top. 

Roll out the other piece of pastry, dampen the edge 



of the lower pastry, and cover it with the top layer; press 
on the rim to seal, trim neatly, paint the top with he 
reserved egg, and sprinkle with a little cinnamon. Bake 
for 30 to 40 minutes at 400 degrees. This is tasty served . 
either hot or cold. 

Too many tomatoes 

Have too many tomatoes? Wash and core them, cut 
out any bad spots. Do not skin, you will lose too many 
nutrients. Blend well with a pinch of salt. . 

Microwave In a glass covered dish 5 minutes per 
quart. Cool . Place tomato sauce in a zip lock bag to 
freeze or pour in ice cube trays to freeze. (3 cubes equal 
1 medium tomato. Use all winter long for chili sauce, 
soups, spaghetti, stews, etc. Enjoy! 








FALL VEGETABLES & APPLES 

NOW READY 

All your fall decorating needs, 
Indian Corn, Gords, Pumpkins, Etc. 

HARDY GARDEN MUMS IN FULL BLOOM 
FRESH APPLE CIDER 

RICHARD STILE'S VEGETABLE FARM 

11717 Sheridan Road, Kenosha (1 mile N. of State line) 
OPEN Daily 9-6, (414) 694-5256 

BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND CAMERAS 
TO SEE OUR HALLOWEEN DISPLAY 

OPENING OCT. 8TH 







Ziegler's 

Orchard 



PICKING SEASON DAYS & HOURS 

Sat. & Sun. 9-5, Open Columbus 
ALL VARIETIES RJLPE FOR PICKING! 

R£D/(K)LD£N DELICIOUS, BA^ 




Ready-picked apples & pears, apple (708) 546- 1 228 

pastries, cider, honey, jellies, jams, spices, our FAMOUS STRUDEL 
squashes, perennials, colorful mums, pumpkins, Give the BEST, 
gourds and Indian corn. Unlike the Rest 

Mb are located on Bacon W Just south of Hw* J 20, 4 mites Wea<f<ka^v2nteVksttfHaineaffle 



1 






Largest annual event at McHenry County fairgrounds set 



The Mental Health 
Resource League for 
McHenry County will be 
sponsoring the ninth 



annual Fall Dlddley craft 
show on Oct. 8 from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 9 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 



Antiques Collectables o" Furniture 

From 1860 to 1960 

MANY BARGAINS 

DEALER SPACE AVAILABLE 

Zion Antique Mall 

2754 Sheridan Rd. 

. Downtown Zion 

Open Daily 10-5; Sunday 1-5 

(Closed Mondays) 

(708> 731-2060 



the McHenry County 
Fairgrounds, Rte. 46 and 
Country Club Road, 
Woodstock. ■ 

Craft show enthusiasts 
will find over 300 booths 
displaying a wide variety 
of hand-crafted goods, 
Including folk, art and 
woodcarvlng, dried 
florals and pottery, 
painted clothing and 
fabric applique, Jewelry 
and fine art. Food 
concessions and bake 
sales, carnival rides, 
painted faces and 
pumpkins and a quilt 
raffle are also featured. 



Admission Is $3 for 
adults, $1 for youths ages 
5 to. 17 and no charge for 
children under 5 years 
old. Parking at the 
fairgrounds Is free and 
free parking with shuttle 
service Is available from 
Marian Central High 
School, located one mile 
east of Rtes. 47 and 120. 

The all-volunteer 
league strives to maintain 
a high quality of 
excellence In Its Juried 
shows. Fair Dlddley In 
May and Fall Dlddley In 
October. New members 
are always welcome. 



Dues are $5 per year, with metal health 

Proceeds benefit services. Volunteers from 

McHenry County the agencies participate 

agencies- concerned . at both shows. 




Antiques offered at fairgrounds 



Sunday, Oct. 9 at the 
Lake County Fairgrounds, 
Rtes. 45 and 120, 
Grayslake will be host to 
hundreds of exhibitors 
from several states selling 
their collections from the 
past. 

From the largest Items 
to the smallest, this 



established and well 
recognized show Is for 
both the serious and 
casual collector. 

Viewing hours are 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Adult 
admission Is $3. For more 
Information call 223-1433 
or 356-7499. 



DUFFY'S ATTIC 



J'lW"' 



Antiques & Collectibles 

Anything from Custard 

Glass to Cannon Balls 

Buy & Sell 



CLOCK REPAIR 



Estates 'Purchased 
22 Center Street, Grayslake 

(708)223-7454 

Tues.-Sat. 10:00 a,m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Sun. 12:00 noon - 4:00 p.m. 



-WANTED TO BUY- 

Oltl (,mis, i'oifrfi'i Horns, Swords, 

[\or Soiu'i'iiirs and lichtlctl Items. 

Also (locks, ioys, Pockvi Walchi's 

<tn<l I >cffrcssion (ihtss 




Grant High School 
6th Annual 



CRAFT SHOW 



Saturday, October loth 

9:00 AM thrd 4:00 pm 

# FREE ADMISSION 

285 E. GRAND AVE. 
FOX LAKE, IE 

{for more information (708) 587-9561 



I 



Grayslake 

Antiques 

& 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
OCTOBER 9 

Admission *3.00 



Grayslake 



c>4rts 
Crafts 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, IL 

Illinois 120 & US 45 
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

OCTOBER 22 & 23 

ADMISSION $2.00 

Lake County Promotions 

P.O. Box 461 

Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

708/223-1433 or 

708/356-7499 



j»jrswa 



Tzz^zzsam 



»■■ n — m .»***....■* 



■ . ■ - i m ■'" 



3^eiUa.iu n _> i 




1 CLASSIFIED UkelANd Ntwsp/vpERs OcTob» 7, 1994 




Women's Club host benefit art and craft show 



The Barrlngton St.. Anne Women's 
Club Is sponsoring their 12th annual 
"Visions of Sugar Plums" arts and crafts 
show Oct. 14 and 15. The 1994 show will 
be the largest ever, with more than 70 
artist exhibitors from '. Illinois and the 
surrounding Midwest. Shopping hours 
have been extended to Include 
Friday evening to accommodate 
busy schedules. 

Fiber art, American doll furniture, 
patch quilted jackets and dresses, 
American doll clothes, dried florals, 
antique Santas, blrdhouses, herb 
vinegars, baskets, woodcrafts, 
handpalnted clothing and runners 
amongst others. 

Seasonal Items for sale this year 
Include Halloween, Thanksgiving, and 
of course Christmas decorations. Also 
featured are Items that range from 



hand-crafted painted chairs and 
cabinets to small accessories of 
personalized hair bows. Something for 
the entire family. 

For the shop-tlll-you-drop crowd, 
the gourmet coffee and dessert bar, 
Cafe Jacques will be a blessing. 
Choose from a variety of flavored 
coffees and toppings all served In a 
cozy cafe setting. (All graciously 
donated by the Home Economist In 
Barrlngton). 

The Sugar Plum raffle Is bound to 
have another successful year as great 
fund-raising activity of the arts and 
crafts show. Seventy Items will be 
donated by the exhibitors and raffled 
off on Saturday. The Women's Club Is 
busy putting the last minute touches on 
a mlnl-qullt being donated for the 
raffle. The Christmas wall, hanging Is 



beautifully and depicts folly ole St. Nick 
gilding high In the starlight sky. Below 
Santa, lay ' sleeping village of patch 
quilt houses. This certainly will be a. 
treasure for the lucky winner. 

A luncheon featuring South of the 
Border taco salad, pizza, and 
homemade chill with all the fixln's will 
be available both days from 1 1 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. The lower level will also house 

the famous St. Anne Women's Club 
bake sale. More than 300 Items are. for 
sale, to enjoy on-the-spot or take 
home as gifts.' 

Again, the Women's Club sponsors 
a Kid's Korner.wlth balloons, face 
painting, and Halloween treat bags 
for all those special ghosts and 
goblins. 

Visions of Sugar Plumbs will be 
open Friday, Oct. 14 9:30 a.m. to 7 



p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 15 from 9:30 
a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Committee coordinators Include: 
Kim Platenlk, chairman; Anne Maxwell, 
quilt and set-up; Jan Wolowlckl, 
admissions; Debbie Calpln, bake sale; 
Janet Asher, luncheon; Kathy Clganek, 
raffle; Debbie Kantarskl, pubHclty; 
Nancy Daluga, Women's Club Kid's 
Korner; Tess Lehr, Suzanne Hyde, and 
Kathy Casey, Cafe Jacques; Marilyn 
Ortlnau, president; Mlndy Franzen, 
treasurer. 

This Is the primary fundraiser for the 
St. Anne Women's Club enabling the 
organization tosupport parish ministries" 
and other community services In the 
Barrlngton area. 

Volunteers are * needed on all 
committees. Contact St. Anne Church 
at 382-5300 for more information. 






I 



W 



Cr 



lAul T<Vi innii'il ^ 




Rural Woodstock 7th Annual 

Antiques * Arts & Crafts - Pumpkins 

October 14, 15 and 16 • 9-6 p.m. 

RainorSbhie jfa. 
Autumn Drive 'W 
on Garden Valley Rd. 20 min. West of Crystal Lake 
Take RL 176 West to N. Union RcUum North .^" 

£> Door prizes from Woodstock Optra House & Pub on the Square ^KF 

INFORMATION (815) 568-8823 

&***'$ — Afrt? 



Oct 



* 





SAFARI TRADING 
GIFT & THRIFT 

• High Quality Used Clothing 

• Useable Furniture & Household Goods 

• Antiques A Collectibles 

• Handmade International Gifts 

Horns: Mon.-Fri. 10:00-5:00 
Saturday 10:00 4:00 . . 

329 Seymour (Hawley Commons) 
Mundeleln 



949-5066 



JD 



FALL DIDDLEV 



OVER 300 CRAFTERS 

Saturday October 8 - I0 AM to 5 PM 
Sunday October 9 - 10 AM to 4 PH 
McHenry County Fairgrounds 
Route 45 4V Country Club Road 
Woodstock 



A 




FREE FAIRGROUND PARNHG 
FREE SHUTTli FROM HARIAN CENTRAL HS 
One mile East of Route 47 on Route 1 20 







• mmwmwm * 



ti.it 



VV V V < ^\/jf 



m * •> 



ADrlrSStON: , 
Adults S3;Youths 5-17 $1 
Children under 5 free 



W 



Sponsored by the Volunteer! of 
THE MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCE LEAGUE FOR HcHEKRV COUNTY 






Over 100 Crofters... 

Qtcfou'af* ami 

tfotdAwat 

Qiginalt 

mw 

HOLIDAY 

HOURS 

<w> ' Mon & wed ioam - 8pm 136 Center St. 

** Tues.-TTiurs.-Fri. 10am -6pm Gmyslake, IL 60030*-* 

*l SCUTS (708) 548-2203* 

tie '+- 1±» a# * **!**,* et' *>>* et**e '«#' '* sw « *v " 

iM 9. >k * • &&* *■ <w *■ &*M* M K M §sv 




and \^ 
9hamkguwg- i>/> 

any @atiaj ^ 



*s*J 




inamosa 



Pln/ifi 



WE BUY & RESTORE ANTIQUES 

Ono Item Or Entire Estate 



Specializing in Fumriure.„Formal To Country...Coins 
Depression Glass, Toys, Dels, Primitive Accessories , Collectibles 

5 Minutes West of Gurnee Milts Mall Tuesday ■ ^^ 

10am-Spm:" 

Closed Monday 

Just West of Rt. 45 on Rt. 132 • 10056 W. Grand Ave 



356-0832 



■EEEEEBEEEEEEEBEEEEEEEEEEEEBBB 

I CRAFTERS WANTED i 




E 
E 
E 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



The Country Sampler Store, 

an affiliate of Country Sampler, 

the nation's leading finished craft magazine, 

has limited booth space available 

for the upcoming Christmas season. 

Stores are located In high profiler 

high traffic shopping centers in the 

Chicago suburbs. Ask for the ' 

Crafter Services Rep at any of our stores; 



Naperville 
Arlington Hts 
Lake Zurich 



(708) 357-9161 
(708)253-9094 
(708) 726-2606 



B 

B 
B 

B 
B 
B 
B 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



Call Now! Space is limited B 

■EEEEEEBBEBEEEEBEEBBEBBEEEBEBB 





The Shops 
on Scranton 

Come See How We've Grown 

Antiques, Art & Accessories 

New Arrivals Daily 

A Big City Shop in a Small Town 

37 E. Scranton Ave. 

Lake Bluff 

(708)735-0001 

Mon.-Frl. 11-6 ; | 

pff ' sot. io-4 jg§ 



WAKi.nousr: 



October 1st thru Qgtcber 31st 
PICK • A • PUMPKIN SALE 

SAVE 1©% 13% GR 15% 
©FF PARTICIPATING ITEMS 

'some restrictions may apply 



Ol I* \l V\ I \kl \ II t V M \ 
\OIU II Ol KOI I INS Kl> 

(>S DIVllR Nl VI I 

2 S. I ..la- Si., (.uvsl.ilu' 

ll.miv M-S..I HJ-S 

Stiii. U)-^ - 2,ul Sun. 10-^^0 

(70S) 22 ^- l >=o4 



1 IS 1 ( H \1 I I > ON K I I . S.1 
St >t I II Ol t ,K \NI> \N I 

^S 1)1 u IK Mill 

^7011 \. Ui. S^, |.,| vl . \j| 
Uimiis: \I-S.u )() ^ 



(70S) 2(»S-<)()^() 



tfl 



OcTobe* 7, 1994 LaIceIanc) Newspapers SPORTS/LEISURE. 




Antioch, Lake Zurich win on final-second field goals 



Stevenson 35, 
North Chicago 10 
Stevenson running backs bull- 
dozed their .to. victory as the 
Patriots won their fourth consec- 
utive conference game. Fullback 
Shea Ncwcomb rushed for 111 
yards, while Rob Uszka rushed 
for another 112 yards. 

Libertyville 28, Machesney 
Park-Harlem 12 
With Steve Witcraft still healing 
from a rib injury, senior running 
back Chris Kcphart stepped in 
the rushing role as scored two 
touchdowns on 07 yards of rush- 
ing. The Wildcats remain the 
sole leaders atop of the North 
Suburban Conference with a 5-1 



record overall and 4-1 in the 

NSC. 

Warren 34, Mundclein 14 
Zach Florlo rushed for two 
touchdowns and Ryan Kclver 
passed for one and ran for one as 
quarterback. Warren stays in the 
playoff hunt at 4-2, 3-2 North 
Suburban Conference. 

Antioch 22, Lake Forest 20 
Antioch field goal kicker Kurt 
Ilintz provided the heroics as 
kicked a 35-yd. field goal with 40 
seconds left. Running back Brad 
Rubash led in rushing with 109 
yards, while Dave Smith scored 
twice on the ground for the 
Sequoits. Antioch imprioved its 



record to 3-2, 3-3. 

Marian Central 42, 
Round Lake 6 
It was too much Jason Liska for 
Marian as he rushed for 155 yards 
and a touchdown. Todd McCoy 
scored two touchdowns rushing. 
Tim Buchannon scored Round 
Lake's touchdown. 

Grant 12, Grayslake 7 

Dave Stone's 1 -yard TD run was 
the difference, capping a 16-ptay 
drive. Dave Jakstas, quarterback, 
scored Grant's other TD. Jarcl 
Tompkins ran for Grayslake's 
lone score. The win was the first 
for Grant, 1-5, 1-1, while the 
Rams fall to 2-4, 1-1. 



Waucorida 19, Johnsburg 16 

OT 
Justin Thlel scored 3 TD's, the 
last from a yard out In overtime 
to give Wauconda its first win. 
Johnsburg remains winless at 0- 
6. ' 

Hampshire 12, 
Richmond-Burton 7 
Lucas Dehmiow * scored 
Richmond's touchdown. But 
it was not enough as 
Hampshire scored twice In 
the second half and stopped 
the Rockets from two yards 
out to end the game. 

Marist 29, Carmel 22 
Carmel gained touchdowns 



from Ruben Rivera, two on 71 
yards and a 42-yard pass and 
Nick Ycager tossed a 5 yard pass 
to Mike Graham, but it was not 
enough as Marist rallied for an 
East Suburban Conference win. 
Carmel slips to 2-4, 1-3, 

Lake Zurich 35, 
Crystal Lake South 32 
Pat Devlto nailed a 31 -yard 
field goal against the windto 
win it for the undefeated Bears.. 
Running back Mike Stumpp 
continued his rushing and 
receiving brilliance with 315 
all-purpose yards, Lake Zurich 
faces off against undefeated 
McHenry Friday in a Fox Valley 
Conference showdown. 





Newspapers 




THIS 

- 

Classic 

CLC spikers capture 
& classic; aiih to tiuild 
R\GEC29 




BqbLove'to 
R\GEC29 






at CLC 



.(V, 

- 

0. 




■ ■ 




Stevenson linksters take 
crown PAGE CM 



■': 

. 
■ 



Bear booters take 10th 
RAGEC31 S 

',-• -■-Cj-.-f :" '.>■ ■-" ' ■'. ■ ,. :■-■■■ i',-^'-. -"-" :&£#'£ 

■•■: >■'"''.■.:,.;. V:"."--- ■ »' : ----- - " « '•■ ■ *^-i v^-*: ; x'*.A>*m4( 

r ''■■ '.'■■'' ' .• ' ' . ': y - «. . ". '■ . ■■ « ii'Ffl'.'? ■ vV 

CLG's Gummihgs 
to play at Erskine 

Erskine College in Due 
West, S.C., has signed six 

. .- baseball players, including 
former ': Lancer Heath 
Cu m mirigs from; the College 
of Lake County. 

Fourth-year Head Coach 

"I Bob O'Hoppe said this could 
be one of the best recruiting 
classes he has put together at 
Erskine. The Flying Fleet fin- 
ished 17-24 last season: : { 

"This kid has a lot of 
heart," O'Hoppe said of 
Cummings. ^We look for him 
to contribute a lot He's a 
good all-around player who 
could help us at shortstop 

;i; ; this;se^6n,''^:;^^ 

Cummings hit .331 last ; 
year with two doubles, sut 
triples, six homers and ^39 

f-. RBIs, He was an \_ AU% 

J^ogference; -selection, .-.- was ,. 
namedlltO; ; the -.1 All-State i'l 

$W^m i IVsquacji^anci played 

$ in the Illinois Junior Cpllegev 

1( .~All : Stargame, 



Griffin seeks pair of "picks' for complete Vikes 



Opposing Lake County 
Vikings quarterbacks, take note. 

Gary Griffi n is hot done yet. 
The Vikings free safety gained 
two more interceptions, one in 
each half, to bring his team-lead- 
ing total to 10. 

"My goal is to get 12," Griffin 
said. ._ 

The two latest picks give him 
six for the last two games and 
came. in a game in which the 
semi-pro football Vikings were 
totally outmatched by Racine, 36- 
6. 

"He has a nose for the foot- 
ball. We use him for punt returns, 
too," Vikes Coach Kurt 
Kampcndahl said earlier. 

His second interception was 
in the Lake County end zone, 
.breaking up another possible 
Racine score. 

Griffin also notched a first 
down against the mighty Racine 
defense on. a fourth-down play. 
That was significant because the 
home team only gained 9 yards 
on this wind-blown, chilly night 
at Round Lake High. 

"Returning punts is my fa- 
vorite thiijg to do," Griffin said. ■ 

Griffin keyed a defensive- 
minded game with those- four 
picks to a 15-0 romp over the 
Falcons. 

Griffin was in training camp 
with the New Orleans Saints be-, 
fore being cut. 

"I would like to get back to the 



pros. I plan on giving semi-pro 
baU one more year," he said. 

He was a defensive standout 
at Concordia University. 

The Vikings slipped to 4-3 
with the loss and Racine kept its 
march to another national cham- 
pionship game going at 6-0. 

It was 22-0 at* halftime as 
Frank Registcrer directed Racine 
to a 5-yard TD run by Kevin Elli- 
son, a TD run for 8 yards and a 
30-yard pass completion. The 
first score came seven minutes 
into the game and it was downhill 
from there as far as any Vikes 
upset hopes. 

Gordon Bittncr directed the 
second-half attack. Frank Lcntos 
scored from 17 yards out and 
Bittncr took it in himself for a 36- 
lead. 

"Last time (45-0 loss) it was all 
negative. This time I saw some 
positives," Coach Kampendahl 
said. "We are operating our 
offense better and moving the 
ball." 

Chris Hare and Todd Brown 
shared quarterback duties for the 
Vikings, and either one could be 
the starter when the Vikings play 
the Falcons at Round Lake High 
at 6 p.m. Oct 8. 

"The guy who does not start 
docs not appreciate it because 
they are both competitors, but 
neither one is that outstanding 
that he is our No. 1 guy. We will 
evaluate that," Kampendahl said. 





?»H«f 



A Viking running back makes his way down the field.— Photo by 
Bill Carey 

CLC netters garner crown 



The Vikings Reggie Lawrence struggles to hang on after receiving 
the ball.— Photo by Bill Carey 



There was no stopping the 
College of Lake County's women's 
tennis team at the Skyway 
Conference tourney as the Lancers 
won the meet by 10 points. 

"I thought it was a good effort. 
1 am very proud of this team," 
CLC Coach Dick Watson said. 

The Lancers met their biggest 
challenge at the College of DuPage 
Tuesday. The match served as a 
dress rehearsal for the regional 
tournament at COD Oct 7 and 8. 
"COD is the prohibitive favorite 
They arc very deep. We could be the 
top two teams and qualify for 
nationals, but it all depends on the 
draw," Watson said. 

CLC did not lose a match in 
chalking up 22 points, 10 better 
than second-place Waubonsec. 
McHenry was third with 6 points. 

CLC will bring some impres- 
sive records into the season's fi- 
nal week. First singles player Irina 
Dobin is 22-0 at singles and dou- 
bles; Lisa Ree is 19-4 and Becki 



Ziolek is 25-3, 15-1 in singles. 

"Natalie Rompalla, Liza Lopez 
and Ziolek have all improved 
considerably, but this past week I 
have been impressed with the 
play of Lopez," Watson said. 

"Lopez is doing some real 
thinking out there and using 
some strategy and so is Ziolek. 
Ziolek is playing with more pa- 
tience," the coach commented. 

Dobin swept her opponents 
without surrendering a game at 
Sugar Grove. CLC downed North 
Park 6-3 for a 13-1 dual meet record. 

Dobin was challenged at first 
singles and lost games for one of 
the few times this season. She won 
6-3, 6-3. Ziolek won 6-3, 6-2 in a 
good match. Rompella won twice 
in singles, 6-0, 6-0 at No. 5 and 6-2, 
6-1 at No. 6. Whatever transpires 
the final week, Watson knows his 
team has accomplished much. 

"I have enjoyed working with 
this group of young people," he 
said. 



l»«WWwt , VW'** : * ,v - ; '-—»"- 




SPORTS/LEISURE UIceIancI Newspapers October 7, 1 994 






.1 



Duchane overcomes hurdles, obtains NIU starter position 



STEVE PETERSON '" 

Staff Reporter 

Mike Duchane had one of the 
first duties as Northern Illinois 
battled Eastern Illinois Saturday 
night tn a non-conference foot- 
ball game in DcKatb. 

It was his job to provide some 
of the prc-gamc inspiration as 
captain. He was out there catting 
the flip of the coin for kickoff, 
then helping to get the Huskies 
revved up for what turned out to 
be an easy 49-17 win over Eastern 
Illinois, 

Duchane Is an example to all 
young football players. Me plays 
and starts Division I-A football 
despite a diabetes. condition. 

"I am a diabetic and it limits 
my practice time so far, but not 
game time," Duchane said. 

Duchane learned of his con- 
dition during his sophomore year 
at Grayslakc High. Me did not let 
it stop him then, as he went on to 
have a fine. senior season as the 
Rams made the playoffs. 

The play of Duchane and C. I. 
Rose at the defensive ends 
helped stop the E1U offense and 
take pressure off the home 
team's offense. 

"I am really pleased with the 
play of Rose at left defensive end. 
Duchane is a good player who 
could be better but he is limited 
in practice because of his med- 
ical concerns," NIU Coach 
Charlie Sadler said. 

Duchane carefully watches 
his sugar intake. He was forth- 



coming about the condition. 

The Huskies' (1-3) defense 
could be overlooked in a game 
which featured 602 yards in of- 
fense and the 10th longest I'D in 
school history. It changed the 
team's morale heading into a Big 
West test at home against 
Nevada at 1 p.m. Oct. 1. 

M Thc win was a big boost. If 
we can win the rest of our con- 
ference games, we can be guar- 
anteed the champ. All the con- 
tenders have one loss," Duchane 
said. 

Duchane registered 29 tack- 
les last year and 40 the year be- 
fore that. He lists among his best 
games a contest against Army In 
1992 and Illinois this year. 

"I thought positively about 
the Illinois game right up until 
the end," he said. 

Duchane, 6-foot, 3 inches, 
245 pounds, gained the No. 1 
spot at defensive end after 
spring drills. He earned a letter 
in 1992aftcrspcndingayearasa 
red-shirt and a back-up line- 
backer. He was a linebacker for 
the Rams. 

"The biggest change is playing 
all over the country before thou- 
sands of people instead of just in 
Lake County," Duchane said. 

He has also had to experience 
lightning delays. NIU had one for 
45 minutes at Southwest 
Louisiana and a 28-minutc ver- 
sion Saturday. 

"We worked diligently on 
keeping them pumped and 




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ready, but you can only have a 
pep talk so long. We arc the only 
team to have experience In light- 
ning delays," Sadler quipped. 

Duchane pressured the EIU 
quarterback on the game's first 
play. A defensive stand with NIU 
ahead 7-3 turned the game 
clearly in the home team's favor, 
as it would score the next 35 
points. 

NIU played five quarter- 
backs in the game, but it was 
Aaron Gilbert, who directed the 
show. He threw a 31 -yard TD 
pass to Ralph Strickland in a 
174-yard night. The ground 
game emerged from the shad- 



ows of LaShon Johnson as 
Charles Tallcy scored two touch- 
downs and had 141 yards and 
Brian Grimes had 121 yards and 
a touchdown. 

"He gained a lot of confi- 
dence/' Sadler said of Gilbert 

Duchane had a rough night 
in the tackles department, but 
always has memories of days of 
the green and white. 

"I remember every game, es- 
pecially the Round Lake game In 
1909," he said. 

Duchanc's debut came in a 
loss to Illinois in 1992. He had 
seven hits and a "hurry". 

Duchane, who played in 209 



snaps in eight 
games last 
year, knows in 
eight weeks, 
unless the 
Huskies make 
the Las Vegas 
Bowl, football 
will be over. 

"I would 
like to work 




Mike Duchane 



Abbott 



for 
Laboratories," he said. 

The engineering technologies 
major is as thrilled as any former 
Ram about his cx-tcam's return 
to die winning column. "I keep in 
touch a lot with basketball Coach 
(Greg) Groth," he said. 



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OcTob»7, 1994 




Papers SPORTS/LEISURE 




Passing 

The East Suburban Catholic 
Conference football race being 
what it ls f there is little time to 
feel bad about a loss. 

So CarmcL High's squad must 
bounce back from a heartbreak- 
ing 29-22 loss to Marist to face a 
powerful Jolict Catholic team at 
home Oct. 7. 

"It is a hard schedule, and you 
can't feci sorry for yourself. So 
far, we have had a good week of 
practice," Carmcl Coach Mike 
Fitzgibhons said. 

Last week's loss dropped the 
Corsairs to 2-4 overall, 1-3 ESCC 
and all but out of playoff con- 
tention. 




The Corsairs will go with Nick 
Ye age r as starting quarterback in 
the 8 p.m. game against Jolict 
Catholic. 

"Yeagcr played well at QB. He 
is a gamer. It (the quarterback 
Job) is still open, but for now we 
will go with Yeagcr," Fitzglbbons 
said. 

Yeagcr passed for 171 yards 
against a tough Redskin defense 
in Chicago. Mike Graham was his 
favorite. A 20-yard pass play set 
up Carmel's first score, a 5-yard 
TD pass. 

Ruben Rivera scored two 
touchdowns, one on a 42-yard 
pass for a 22-21 lead with just 



■under nine minutes left. He ear- 
lier scored on a 71 yard scamper. 

The late lead did not last. 
With 3:26 left, Jimmy Blackmorc 
.scored the go-ahead Redskin 
touchdown. 

"That was one of the hardest 
losses ever," Fitzglbbons said.. 

The defense was once again 
keyed by Pat Kraft. The line- 
backer had 12 tackles. "He is our 
best defensive player," 
Fitzglbbons stated. 

As for Jolict, the team is in 
second place at 5-1, 4-0. "They 
arc a great team and you cannot 
make mistakes," Fitzglbbons 
said. 



CLC spikers capture own 'classic' 



Jolict, Blackhawk and South 
Suburban' may have been doing 
the talking Saturday, but the 
Lancers preferred to let their tal- 
ent speak volumes. 

CLC's volleyball team gained 
three wins to win its classic tour- 
nament In Grayslakc in what is 
the highlight for the 1994 season. 

"This puts us back on track. 
The other teams were doing 
some talking, but we went out 
and played our game. We are 
hoping it can be that way for the 
rest of the. season," CLC Coach 
Sue Garcia said. 

The Lancers downed Jolict 15- 
4, 15-7; South Suburban, 15-6, 15- 
11 and Blackhawk, 7-15, 15-2, 15-8. 



"We played well and consls- . 
tent," Garcia, whose team stands 
at 13-19, said. "After the first 
game loss to Blackhawk, I asked 
the team if they thought they 
were a better team than us. The 
players said 'no'," Garcia com- 
mented. 

And how. After Lisa 
Bochenck served for a point, 
Taryn Hartman served for 8 
straight and Nicole Bonfanti 6 
straight. 

Bonfanti finished the tourney 
with 37 for 1 38 serving with 25 
points and 5 aces; Bochenck was 
35-for-39 with 22 points and 6 
aces; and Hartman was 31-for-38 
with 22 points and 4 aces. 



Hartman led the net play with 
37-for-46 with 18 kills and 
Natalie Ward was 40-for-45 with 
17 kills. Stacey Harrison was 38- 
for-43 with 13 kills. 

Setting those kills tip was 
Bochenek. She was 130-for-139 
with 37 assists. 

"We use a 5-1 offense and she 
is the 1. She Is doing a majority of 
our setting and doing very well. 
She has improved since the begin- 
ning of the year," Garcia said. 

CLC lost to Kishwaukcc 15-8, 
15t10 and 15-5 In non-confer- 
ence play last week. "We Just did 
not play well," Garcia admitted. 

CLC is at Oak'ton in Skyway 
Conference action Oct 11. 



Former Bull Bob Love at CLC banquet 



. Bob Love,, a member of .the 
Chicago Bulls from 1968 to 1976 
and a three-time NBA All -Star 
team member, will be the guest 

^speaker at the College of Lake 
County's seventh annual Keith 

'Ryan Scholarship Fund and 
Sports banquet Oct. 20 at the 
Midlanc Country Club in 
Wadsworth. . 

Proceeds from this benefit 
event will help to raise funds for a 
$1,000 scholarship established at. 



CLC in memory of Keith Ryan, a 
Lake County sportscaster who 
died of cancer in 1989. 

The banquet will begin with a 
cash bar at 6 p.m., followed by a 
dinner at 7 p.m. The evening will 
feature a keynote address by Bob 
Love; presentation of the 1994 
Keith Ryan scholarship award to 
Jason Micure, a Waukcgan resi- 
dent and a CLC student; induc- 
tion of local sports celebrities 
into the Waukcgan Sports Hall of 



Fame, sponsored by the 
Waukcgan Lions Tciub; raffle 
drawings; and a silent auction. 

This year's Hall of Fame 
inductees arc Joel Hall, Martin 
Silovich, Ralph Tekampe, Jerome 
Whitehead and the late Leonard 
Machak. 

The banquet is open to the 
general public Donation is $25. 
For tickets and information, call 
the CLC Foundation office at 
223-6601, cxt. 2400. 




Lef s go Devils! 

Warren Township High School cheerleaders demonstrate their routine during Homecoming pep 
rally Members Include: Jay Abrenica, Beth Dodge, Michelle Vick. Jessica Bodden, Connie 
Breeder, Andrea Watkins, Yarl Rosa, Tiffany Weir. Nlkkl Johnson, Melissa Hyson. Kim 7Jeger, 
Sophia Petropoulos. Annie Glbbs and Jennifer House. Blue Devils gave fans plenty to cheer 
about In 34-1 4 win over Mundeleln. . 





Carmel's Nick Yeager Is on the run seeking more yards. Yeager 
will be the starting quarterback when the Corsairs when Carmel 
hosts powerful Jollet Catholic at • p.m. Oct 7 In Mundeleln. — 
Photo by Bill Carey 

CLC runners host invite 



College of Lake County's 
mens and womens cross country 
teams will be able to judge how 
they have progressed against 
league teams and top regional 
foes Saturday. 

The Lancers host their own 
invitational and' Waubonsce, 
South Suburban and Moraine 
Valiey_ will all be there. Action 
gets underway in Grayslakc with 
an open meet at 9 a.m. 

"It has been a tremendous 

improvement for the men's 

"team. Their. times arc down four 



to five minutes," Coach Karen 
Graham said. 

Jeff Baumann of Palatine has 
been the leader of the mens run- 
ners with the next four Brian 
Laird, Rick Quigley, Rob Rung 
and Rob Harmon. 

The women have run as a pack, 
the coach said, with Toni Weldon, 
Rcnee Tessmann and Jennifer 
Carlson taking turns as leader. 

The Lancers were second at 
the Milwaukee Area Technical 
College run to Waubonsee last 
week, 50-47. 




Mountain biking 

Northern Illinois Off Road Series In Spring Grove offers month- 
ly mountain bike races through 3.6 miles of woods, hills and 
open space. Various classes Include men's and women's for 
beginner, sport and expert. Participants can win trophies 
and cash prizes. The next race Is Oct. 23. For more Informa- 
tion, call Kriz May at 336-4424 qfer 6 p.m.— Photo by Bill 
Carey 



" ..^i-p**-*' 



t r^T.— ■ _; »■ —_*»** . . - ' 



. . ■ zi.*;;-3t2E2X£l 



;^^^??'Tr^i^ , *U l .i3r»^T-,-.7...jr ,k -»™.- 




B SPORTS/LEISURE UIccIancI NewspApEfts OcTobtr* 7, 1994 



Baseball and other sports offered at new Slammers 



What baseball strike? 

The grand old pastime will be 
back In center stage in Waukegan 
Sunday as Slammer Sports 
Center plans an open house. 

"The concept started 10 years 
ago In Indiana and we wanted to 
open a training camp location in 
Chicagoland. We rented a facility 
last year, but this allows us to do 
daily activities," Tom Habcrkorn, 
founder of TEAM Sports 
International, said. 

TEAM stands for Teamwork, 



Effort, Attitude and Motivation 
its concept will be shown at the 
open house from 12 to 5 p.m. 
Oct. 9 at Slammer Sports 
Center, 351 Oakwood Ave. In 
Waukegan. 

Daily activities will Include 
batting cage rental, baseball and 
Softball hitting leagues, field 
rental for baseball, softball and 
golf, wifflc ball leagues, private 
parties and more. Baseball and 
softball training camps will be 
conducted by TEAM Sports 



Baseball School on various 
weekends from December 
through April. Specialty week- 
end training camps included 
hitting, pitching, catcher, 
inflcldcr and parent-child 
camps, 

.."The hitting leagues .arc 
designed for high school age and 
above," Habcrkorn said. 

Videotapes are taken by the 
sky-cam system, allowing evalua- 
tion of many angles. 

Baseball instructors include 



Jaime Garcia of the Chicago 
White Sox and Jurt H&slcr, also of 
the Sox. Phil Carppcllcrl, former 
Midwest scout director of the 
Now York Mcts, and coach of the 
USA 13-14 year-old Pan Am 
Games team, directs the baseball 
efforts. 

"We have a set curriculum so 
everything Is taught the same at 
all levels. Sometimes a player can 
get confused with theories and 
terminology, but fundamental 
baseball is the same. 



The parent-child camps dates 
arc: pitching, ages 10-16, Jan. 27- 
29; catching, ages 10-16, Jan. 27- 
29; inflcldcr, ages 10-16, Jan. 27- 
29 and hitting, ages 9-16, Feb. 17- 
19. They will be located at 
Waukegan, Providence, Rhode 
Island and Toronto sites. 

. "The camps help players get 
ready for the season and help 
teach parents how to coach," 
Ilambcrkom said. 

For more information, call 
655-3344. 



Wilmot Speedway announces 4lst season point winners 



The 41st season at 
"Wisconsin's Clay Center of 
Speed" came to a close without 
an- engine being fired. 
Unseasonably cold weather on 
Saturday, Oct. 1, forced Toft Auto 
Racing officials to cancel the 
Annual Night of. Championships 
for the second week in a row. 

The season ending night wilt 
not be rescheduled as the final 
checkered flag fell on the season 
long Budwciser Racing Scries. 

1994 Wilmot Champions arc 
Muskego, Wis.'s Dick Colburn in 
the sprints. Kenosha', Wis.'s 
Dennis Spitz came from behind 
to take his first modified title. 
John Poehlcr of Libertyvillc 
chalked up the sportsman 
crown. 

Lorraine Miles made Wilmot 
history by being the first female 
to ever win a season chamionship 
by taking the street stock crown. 

Steve Moulis of Fox Lake, in 
second season, won the mini- 
spring championship despite not 
having won a feature. 

Mini-modified defending 
champion Roy Morrison of 
Antioch repeats. 

Toft Auto Racing officials will 
announce at a later date the sta- 
tus of the 23rd annual Collis A. 



Pearson Memorial Modified 
Race, along with the Bcinc 
Excavating Sprint and J&L Oil 
Modified Shootouts. 

The Annual Toft Auto Racing 
Night of Champions Banquet will 
be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at 
Maravclla's Banquet Center in 
Fox Lake. Tickets, at $16 each for 
the sit-down prime rib dinner, 
must be purchased in advance. 
Deadline is Oct. 29. 

For tickets, send a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope with a 
cheke or money order to Toft 
Auto Racing, Inc., P.O. Box 786, 
Antioch 60002. For information 
phone the track office at 
(414)862-2458. 

Wilmot Speedway's 1995 April 
season opener is to be 
announced. 

Toft Auto Racing's 

Wilmot Speedway 

1994 Budwelser 

Racing Series 

Official Point Standings 

(Final 1994) 

Sprints 
1. Dick Colburn (9)-l,180; 2. Allen 
Winker (10w)-l,L70; 3. Dennis Spitz 
(41)-1,149; 4. Todd Daun (19)-1,101; 
5. Dave Bliss (39)-l,053; 6. Gary Zobel 
(Z93J-97G; 7. Tim Cox (40)-9S0; 8. Tim 



Amnion (D-B40; 9. Kurt Davis (6K)- 
821;10.KrlsSpllz(4K)-802. 

Blcnc Excavating Sprint Dash 
1. Dick Colburn {9)-GG; 2. Dennis 
Spitz(41)-48; 3. Allen Winker (lOwJ- 
42; 4. Todd Daun (19)-40; 5. Tim 
Ainmon (1J-26; 6. Tim Cox (40J-24; 7. 
Kurt Davis (6K)-20;7. (tied) Dave Bliss 
(39J-20; 9. Mike Frost (44J-18; 10. Gary 
Zobcl(Z93)-16. 

Modified* 
1. Dennis Spitz (41H.3G7; 2. 
Jimmy Ultcch, Jr. (12M.345; 3. Gary 
Dye (4)-l,239; 4. Todd Hepfner (28)- 
1,043; 5. Lenny Ostrowskl, Jr. (83)- 
1.021; 6. Tim Cox {40J-949; 7. Craig 
Lager (18)-937{ 8. Fred Zack (92J-886; 
9, Larry Vandervcrc (14)-830; 10. Jerry 
Doles (55) -8 13. 

J&L OH Modified Dash 
1. Jimmy Utlcch, Jr. (12)-90; 2. 
Dennis Spitz (4D-70; 3. Fred Zack 
(92)-60; 4. Lenny Oslrowski, Jr. (83)- 
44; 5. Tim Cox (40)-24; 6. Gary Dye 
(4) -22; 7. Todd IIcplYicr (28)- 10; 8. 
Allen Winker (10w)-8; 8. Jerry Doles 
(55J-B; 10. Keith Qlsen (30)-G; 10. 
(tied) Joe Palmisano (16)-6. 

MfnI-sprlnts 
1. Sieve Moulis (1MJ-754; 2. Scott 
Slppcl (5s)-736; 3. Sieve Rcltlel, Jr. 
(4R)-576; 4. Mall Roebuck (10J-569; 5. 
Romy Baum ( 4)-530; 6. Tony Dlcso 
(78)-528; 7. Kai McNuliy (l4)-440; 8. 
Doug Addison (15) -444; 9. Patrick 



CLC Lancers prepare for 'must' wins 



Revenge and keeping the 
Skyway Conference title hopes 
alive will be on the agenda as 
College of Lake County's mens 
soccer team battles Oakton at 4 
p.m. Oct. 7. 

The Lancers are 2-2 in the 
conference race heading into this 
week and had lost to the Red 
Raiders 2-0 in the league opener 
in Dcs Plaincs. 

"It is really important to win 
conference, so our primary goal 
is to win against Waubonscc and 
Oakton," Coach Dave Beck said. 
"We can still win conference, but 
wc need some help." 

The Lancers, 7-6 overall, host- 
ed the nation's top team, College 
ofDuPage, Oct. 6. 



The Lancers lost a hard- 
fought 2-1 decision at home Sat- 
urday to another ranked team, 
Lewis and Clark. The match was 
decided on a penalty kick in the 
final five minutes. - 

"It was a tough loss against 
one of the top 10 teams. Wc did a 
good job for a 1-1 tic," Beck said. 

Jason Brooks scored the CLC 
goal, with an assist from Dave 
Potcrck. Brooks, a freshman for- 
ward, became the goal leader 
with six. 

"He contributes a lot more 
than goals. It is his maturity as a 
leader on the field with tactics 
and strategics. Wc have five 
freshmen forwards. It is such an 
adjustment from high school 



because they arc going up against 
players that arc much stronger. I 
ask the freshmen forwards to 
work to get to the next level," 
Beck said. 

Last week's highlight was a 3- 
2 win over Triton. Jeff Haug 
scored the match winner, in the 
first of two overtimes. 

"It was on a pass down the left 
sideline. He took a shot from 15 
yards out from his left foot. It was 
not an easy shot," Beck de- 
scribed. 

CLC lost to Elgin 3-0 in Sky- 
way action. 

CLC Is at McHcnry Oct 11 in 
Crystal Lake. CLC hosts the Elgin 
Spartans Oct 13 in a 4 p.m. match 
in the regular season finale. 



Bears booters net 10th win of season 



After being denied a chance 
for first place in the Fox Valley 
Conference, Lake Zurich High's 
boys soccer team did the next 
best thing. 

The Bears took their frustra- 
tions out on Woodstock with a 6- 
win Tuesday. The win improved 
the Bears to 10-4-3 overall, 7-3 
NSC. 

Matt Lange and John Kozlel 
scored a pair of goals each and 
Jeff McKcnna and Chris Bocci 
added goals. Goalie Greg Zaffkc 
registered his 9th shutout. 

"We came out and took con- 
trol. They had played Cary-Grove 



and Jacobs tough, but we took the 
game away from them/' Coach 
Scott Stcib said. 

The Bears fell to league leader 
Cary 3-0 last week. "We arc 
changing our emphasis to the 
state tournament. The best wc 
can do in conference is be co- 
champs/' Steib said. 

While the offense was click- 
ing, a solid wall of defense con- 
sisting of Rob Neff, brothers Ken 
and Nick Pope, Vice Lavcrick and 
Tim Szczcpanlak limited the Blue 
Streaks shots. 

The Bears were going for a 
lock of second .place against 



Jacobs before away matches at 
Crystal Lake South Oct. 10 and 
McHcnry Oct 11. 

Lake Zurich will be at the 
Mundclein sectional complex 
Oct. 21. 

"We hope to be seeded in the 
top five," Stcib said. 



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NWSC golf teams Battle at conference 



It was a rough day on the golf 
course for Northwest Suburban 
Conference teams competing at 
thcWaukcgan regional. * 

Johnsburg had a 356 to lead 
the group at Bonnie Brook Golf 
Course. 

Grant had the second best of 
the NWSC bunch with a 360 
score, far from the Final Four 
score of 336 which advanced ;■ 
teams to this week's sectional. 

The Bulldogs were led by Rob 
Weber with a 42-42 84, just a cou- 
ple of strokes off the top 15 which 
qualified individuals for the sec- 
tional in Northbrook. Dave 
Martin had a 41-45 86, Chris 
Iverscn a 95 and Mike Junge a 
101. 

The toughest break of the day 
went to Grant's Ben Dcgner, 

Dcgner, a sophomore , nailed 
a hole-in-one, believed to be the 
only one of the day, at the third 
hole. But a misunderstanding on 
scoring later cost him a disquali- 



fication. He got to keep the holc- 
In-one, though. . 

"It was on the third hole, 149 
yards with a lake in front. I was 
real happy/' Dcgner said. 

"I've never had aholc-in-onc. 
As a first-year coach, you think 
.the older kids will provide leader- 
ship, but Ben has consistently 
been our No. 3 golfer," Grant 
. Coach Mike Boyan said of the' 
sophomore. 

Grayslake had a 37.1 led by 
Nathan Nyland's 86. Nyland was 
in the last foursome before he 
learned he was four strokes off 
qualifying. Kelly Shoulders had 
an 98, Ryan Johnson a 93, Brian 
Fischer and Don Abramo 95s and 
Jason White 108. 

Round Lake suffered a last-' 
place finish with a 390. David 
Rhcberg and Clayton Davis had 
91s, Geoff Lauritzmen had a 98 to 
break 100. 

' Boyan has high hopes for 
future years at Grant "This is a 



young team which hopefully will 
get better," he' said. "They 
learned a lot about golf." 

The Rams tied for second In 
the NWSC final standings. 

"We started out slow and we 
were very Inexperienced/' Rams 
Coach Troy Harper said. "Nyland 
was our only player back from 
last year." 

Sophs Shoulders, Jason 
White and Jason Szymonlk will 
be back along with junior 
Abaromo. 

Harper had some words of 
. advice for his 1995 team. 

"You can't just put the clubs 
away and. show up for tryouts 
next fall. You have to put some 
time in spring and summer tour- 
naments/' he said. 

Stevenson won the regional 
with 319 strokes, led by a 76 from 
Rob MarinL Also qualifying as a 
.team for Tuesday's sectional in 
Northbrook. were Libertyvillc, 
Lake Forest and Warren. 



SHS linksters make claim to crown 



By the narrowest of margins, 
there is a hew King of regional 

golf' 

With two seniors, a junior, and : 
three sophomores, the Stevenson 
boys golf team won the Class AA 
regional Tuesday with. a score of 
319 strokes, one better than sec- 
ond-place Libertyyille.. 

Rob Marini had a sizzling 76 
and Marc Harris a 79 to lead the 
way. Marini won medalist honors 
■ for the. tourney held at Bonnie 
Brook Golf Course. 
' Also making the trip to the 
sectional at Sportsman's Golf 
"Course in' Northbrook Tuesday 
were Lake Forest and Warren. At 
stake, along with top 15 individ- 
ual qualifiers, will be spots at the 
state golf meet Oct 14 at Illinois 
'State University. 

Warren scored a 336 and won 
the trip based on fifth score, 
denying Lake Zurich a bid. 
Carmel came close as well with a 
337. 

The defending champion 
Wildcats were led by a 77 from 
Dave Commcrford and a 79 from 
Alex Wraight Kevin Dunwoodie 
had an 81, Brian White an 83. 

"My chip shots were going 
well and my driving was'good," 
Marc Harris, a sophomore, said 
of his round. 

Harris, younger brother of 



senior Scott Harris, had a driver 
repaired, after shooting in the 
mid-80s before the regional. 

The score was the low round 
for a few minutes at the 
Waukegan course, until Marini 
.showed up with the 76. 

"1 just wanted to break 80. 1 
had a lot of pars and two 
birdies/' Marini said. 

"All season long, Rob had 
■' been a surprise. He had been one 
or two holes* away from being a 
dominate golfer. Today, in the 
biggest match of the year, he 
proved he could do it," Steven-. 
; son Coach Fred Cremer said. 

Marini, of Buffalo Grove, had 
been averaging 41-42 for nine 
holes. 

"It seems someone always 
picks up the slack and helps one 
. another," Cremer said. 

Speaking of which, is there 
any rivalry amongst the Harris 
family. 

"I help him with my drives 
and he helps me with my 
putting," Scott Harris said. 

• In fact, the Harris golfing duo 
has played PGA caliber courses in 
Arizona and Florida. 

The Wildcats, although not 
thrilled about losing the regional 
title, still kept the tradition of 
making the sectional round. The 
LHS squad has made it 13 of 14 



years. 

"I had a good short game," 
LHS leader Commerford said. 

"I am very pleased with our 
team's effort/' LHS Coach John 
Estcp said. 

Although just missing out 
qualifying as a team, the Bears 
did have two qualify for sectional 
- Michael Keetqr with an 82 and 
Dan Schuh with an 83. 

. Carmel Coach Jim Nolan was 
not pleased with a 337 score. 
Ryan Duncan had ah 83 and 
Tyler Wesley, a soph champ last 
year an 84. Only Duncan quali- 
fied for sectional. 

"I was hoping for a top four 
finish," Nolan said. 

The Corsairs were hoping for 
a strong regional after a second- 
place ESCC tourney finish. 

Mundelein finished with a 
358, but Coach Rick Foss believes 
it is something to build on. Se- 
nior Chris Happ led the way with 
an 87 along with Dave Nellans. 
Breaking 90 was also Jeff Kincs. 

"We improved our score from 
the conference meet. Our goal 
was to get six scores under 90. 

"Happ has done a nice job. 
He had some trouble with his 
back part of the year. He is the 
only senior, and the rest need to 
get seasoned in tournaments this 
summer," Foss stated.. 



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Panthers coaching staff 



Round Lake High's football coaching staff b ready to guide the Panthers to conference title bid. 
First row from left: John Jobst Howard Conkllng, Kevin Dempsey, Doug Bamshawand tTalner Tate 
Martens. Second row: Dave channel, Ron Clark, Doug Moss, Joe Belcher and Rob Rommel. 



cTobct 7, 1994 UltElANd Newspapers SPORTS/LEISURE 






A good lead 

Stevenson tight end Ryan Consdorf caught tour passes for 
107 yards in a 28-0 shutout over Warren. SHS downed North 
Chicago 35-18 to climb up the NSC ladder. The Patriots host 
Antloch Friday night for their Homecoming game.— Photo by 
Mil Carey 



Grant's Benson sets mark 



Ryan Benson set a course 
record as the Grant High boys 
cross country team won its first 
dual meet. 

Benson's 16: 12 was 12 second 
better than the Round Lake 
course record. Grant downed the 
Northwest Suburban Conference 
rivals 18-37. 

Grant finished one-two-threc 
in the boys race. Chuck Rosworth 
had a 16:28 for second, Ryan 
Kcssldr 16:59 for third. Steve Fries 
had a 17:26 for fifth and Kerry 



Gonzalez a 18:40 for 7th. 

Grant's girls team fell to 
Round Lake 29-26 in a close 
meet 

Leslie Stark was third in 
14:11; Pam Koval was fourth in 
14:19;. Sara Skala fifth in 14:39; 
Terr! Gonzalez 8th in 16: 
14; Stacy Scllc 11th in 16:50 and 
Tara Kaspari 12th in 16:51. 

Both teams arc at the Lake 
County meet hosted by Highland 
Park Oct. 10 and the NWSC meet 
hosted by Marian Central Oct. 13. 



'Cat kickers shutout Warren 



Libcrtyvillc High's soccer 
team scored once in both halves 
as the Wildcats shutout Warren 
2-0 Tuesday in Gurncc. 

Libertyville received goals 
from Chris Mitchell off an assist 
from Craig Soling. Neil Mahoncy 
scored in the second half off an 
assist from Neill Waters. 
..- "We did a prettty good job. 
We took away their forwards and 
won a lot of 50-50 balls," Liber- 
tyvUle Coach Andy Bitta said. 

Goalie Cliirs Cichclli, a senior, 
recorded the shutout "He did a 
real nice job," Bitta said. "He 
made about eight or nine good 



saves. 

The win improved Liber- 
tyville to 8-5-1 overall, 3-1 NSC. It 
was the Wildcats second straight 
after losing 1-0 to Stevenson last 
week. LHS downed Round Lake 
6-2 Saturday. 

"We knew we would be a 
young and inexperienced team, 
but we arc getting better and bet- 
ter," Bitta said. " 

Libcrtyvillc faced Mundelein 
Oct. 6 and is at Lake Forest Oct. 
11. 

Warren, 1-0 losers to Carmel 
on Monday, is at Fcnton Oct. 11 
and Antioch Oct. 13. 



Chiefs offering baseball camps 



Lake County Chiefs baseball 
will be hosting another in its sc- 
ries of fall baseball camps Oct. 9 
in Dccrfield. 

Camps will feature instruc- 
tion, drills and a game. Camps for 



10-13 year olds will be held at 
Clavcy Field in Dccrfield. 

The final camp, will be Oct 
16. 

For more information, call Art 
Mansavagc at 945-9606. 



Duchane nears 20 tackles for NIU 



Mike Duchane is closing in on 
the 20 total tackle mark. 

Duchane has 9 solo and 10 
assists after five games at defen- 
sive end. Duchane, a senior, is a 
Grayslake grad. 



The Huskies lost a 35-31 heart- 
breaker to Nevada last week. 

NIU, 1-4 overall, 0-3 Big West, 
hosts New Mexico State in the 
Homecoming game at 1 p.m. Oct 
8inDeKalb. 



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